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MINNECHAUG J dlCOtt 





Little Things Make The 
Difference 

STUDENT LIFE 4 




Never Say Never 
SPORTS . . . 32 





W1LBRAHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Easier Said Than Done 
ACADEMICS 144 




il 



Together As One 
GROUPS 168 




It All Starts Here 
COMMUNITY 192 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/falcon1989minn 




omejhmqs 

/lever 

Change^ 





Wow! Looks like these three 
bathing beauties are relaxing 
on the beach in Florida. Actual- 
ly, Linda Herbert. Karen Zahr. 
and Kim Wyzik are waiting to 
get moving on the Key Club 
float at the Peach Festival. 



1INNECHAUG REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 

621 MAIN STREET 

WILBRAHAM, MA 01095 



STUDENT ENROLLMENT 975 
413-596-9011 









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Quick! Take a look around. 
How close your eyes. What did you see? Not much, right? 
Mow open them. Is anything different? Mot likely. 

Except for the world's constant rotation, nothing has changed. 
We're in homeroom at 7:35 every morning and home by 2:15. 

For five days a week, 376 minutes a day, our routine is the same. 
Even if we're sick and miss a day, the process of making up missed 
work is always the same. It takes us two weeks just to make up for one 
lost day. 

Variety on the weekends? Who's kidding whom? Face it, Wilbraham 
and Hampden aren't exactly overflowing with things to do, and that 
fact will never change. 

However, 1989 was different. We faced life with an acting half-time 
principal and felt the loss of two Industrial Technology teachers. We 
also enjoyed six half days as our teachers worked to begin the pro- 
cess of accreditation. 

With a simple blink of an eye we notice change but no matter how 
many times we blink, somethings never change. 



-^ At Chrissy Froehlich's back to 

/% school party this summer, Chris 

\J Morissette looks on with enthusi- 

asm as Todd Dickinson plays a 

friendly game of nerf ping-pong against Jeff 

O'Shaughnessy. 



/^ As pretty as a picture. Estella 
/ % Kranenburg, an exchange student 
\f from Holland, is posed for a por- 
trait being sketched by Kelly 
Thomas during their D-block art class. 









Ittltmi 



mas 

Ulak the 
ifference 



Have you ever talked to your parents about what they used to do when 
they were your age? Yes, they used to be teenagers! When they tell 
you their stories of sock hops, going out to eat pizza, their "steadies" 
and parking, you just laugh and think how weird it sounds. But, think about 
it. What do we do when we go out? We go to dances, binge on Ben and 
Jerry's, we commit ourselves to steady boyfriends and girlfriends, and, yes, 
admit it, we park. But what makes us different, or what makes us think we 
are unique, are the little things. 

At dances, we "slow" dance to groups like Led Zeppelin or Journey, 
instead of Pat Boone. We eat the same foods, just at more contemporary 
hangouts. We date the same guy or girl, but we call it "going out" instead of 
"going steady." Face it, though, parking is parking. It's kind of like geome- 
try. The concepts just don't change from year to year. 

no matter how we dress, what we eat, or what music we listen to, 
SOME THINGS NEVER CHANGE. 



Lisa Lewis relaxes at the side of the pool 
after swimming all day at the Hampden 
Country Club on a hot August day. 







STUDENT LIFE DIVIDER 




STUDENT LIFE DIVIDER 



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"Ask me any- 




thing else. I 


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can answer 




anything 


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else.'' 


— Kirsten Root 




That goalie. 
What's his 
name?'' 

— Todd Qibbs 



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"Oh, *!*!*!??' 



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'Mike Eru- 
zione.'' 

— Doug Rose 




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Those Lazy, Hazy, Crazy Days 
of Summer 



As soon as the 1:51 
bell rings on the last 
day of school, there 
is a mad rush to the 
doors. Summer has begun! 
Summer holds many differ- 
ent expectations for our 
peers. For some it means 
work seven days a week. "I 
worked six days a week 
over the summer/' remarks 
Peter Spellios. "But, it was 
worth it because 1 made 
lots of money." For some, 
summertime means head- 
ing to the Cape or to Maine. 
Bill Scarlett spent his entire 
summer in Maine, "It was 
great," he says. "I got to 
meet a lot of new people 
and I had a lot of fun." Alli- 
son Mullett mixed business 
with pleasure as she spent 
the summer at Cape Cod 
working. Amy Fitzgerald did 
the same at her summer 
home in Connecticut. 
Many of us stayed home 



working, but managed to 
find time to go to Block Is- 
land, the Cape, or Maine 
and attend summer con- 
certs. Kerry Cesan worked 
at Sullivan's Mountainview 
Drive-ln and she was also 
able to escape the severe 
heat of this past summer by 
driving with friends Kateri 
Collins and Sue Kibbe to 
Misquamicut. She was also 
able to attend the Squeeze 
Concert at Great Woods. 
Jason Bergeron and John 
Qalarneau went to see Def 
Leppard in Hartford. 

Becky Emerle, Julie Mo- 
tyl, and Karianne Kraus 
worked part time at Papa 
Gino's. In their free time 
they traveled to Misquami- 
cut for the beach or to 
Showcase to see movies. 
Penny Qriswold comment- 
ed that 'Showcase was a 
real escape this past sum- 
mer because it provided 



some interesting entertain- 
ment while at the same 
time providing air condi- 
tioned relief from the heat." 

Chrissy Froehlich spent 
her summer working as a 
camp counselor, but also 
took time out to go to the 
beach. "I had fun at camp," 
she says, 'but 1 looked for- 
ward to getting away with 
my friends too." 

Molly Rihm, Greg Le- 
febvre, Jeff O'Shaughnessy, 
and Shaun Cole were 
among the many who could 
be found at Lake Mark cool- 
ing off from the heat. Oth- 
ers smartly took advantage 
of their membership in the 
Hampden Country Club or 
visited friends who have 
pools. Those lazy, hazy, 
crazy days of summer. As 
Brigette Pelouze bemuses, 
"If it were only longer ..." 




What happened to the oars? Penny Griswold is 
left stranded in the middle of Chrissy Froeh- 
lich's grandmother's pool in Springfield. For- 
tunately she got out to enjoy the rest of the 
back-to-school party held in August. 

Sue Messier and Kathy Hoffman enjoy a quiet 
picnic alone on the beach on one of the cooler 
days in August. 




After cleaning up the courtyard the day before school start- 
ed, a few students took off for a picnic in Ludlow. Jen Doyle 
and Sue Hanrahan finish their lunch while the others go 
wading in the rapids. 



SUMMERTIME 




Bill Fridlington enjoys a leisurely 
ride around Lor.g Island Sound 
while vacationing in Rhode Island 
this summer. 

Is this required reading? Jeff Zahr 
works on expanding his vocabu- 
lary after an evening at friendly's 
with Penny Griswold, Marianne 
Kraus, and Chris Baer. 




Look, it's a bird, it's a plane, no 
wait, it's just the concert dome for 
the Peach Festival being put up. 
Mate Scott and Chris Meisner take 
a break from football practice to 
watch as the structure is built. 



OPEN the doors to 
Minnechaug. One 
world does not face 
you. Living inside are 
many worlds, faces, 
likes, lives and styles. 
It's the common 
thread of what defines 
us as students. 

SOME KIDS "ain't 
looking for nothing but 
a good time'' while 
others strive to be their 
best, but all share the 
time period of the late 
Eighties. 

OUR IDOLS reflect 
our diversity. Greg 
Louganis in the 24th 
Olympiad at Seoul 
proved that through 
hard work and ambi- 
tion, he could be the 
best during competi- 
tion. Plikki Six beat out 
pounding rhythms with 
heavy metal Motley 



Crue. Ronald Reagan 
gave new meaning to 
the word jelly bean. 
Moonstruck Oscar win- 
ner, Cher, brought 
younger boyfriends 
into style while Kevin 




Costner of "No Way 
Out'' managed to 
come out big on the 
silver screen. 



SUMMERTIME 



$ 




"Don't pick on my friend Bill!" says Jen- 
nifer Doyle of Bill Scarlett as they chat 
outside the school. 



\ 



WHEN all else fails, there's always the thirty minute drive to Show- 
case in West Springfield or the Cinemas in Enfield, where great films 
such as Big, Diehard, Platoon, Cocktail, Police Academy III, Secret of My 
Success, The Lost Boys, Top Gun, Back to the Future, Crocodile Dun- 
dee, Three Men and a Baby, Less Than Zero, Coming to America, Dirty 
Dancing, A Fish Called Wanda, Wall Street, Caddy Shack, and of course 
E.T. are shown. One of the most recent and successful movies ever 
since E.T. was Who Framed Roger Rabbit a pseudo-animation that 
incorporated our favorite cartoon characters from Bugs Bunny to Mick- 
ey Mouse. It's the latest in movie technology, taking over three years to 
be produced. It was an unexpected change in the movies that makes 
them even more interesting. 

Many of us were willing to spend the $5.25, because it got us out of 
the house and out of the summer heat. It also gave us a change from 
the usual hangouts like Friendly's, Pizzeria Uno, Sullivan's Drive-in, and 
Eastfield Mall. 




Seniors Jeff Bennett, John Christie, and Fenny Griswold talk at friend- 
ly's after a chorus concert they participated in. 



Seniors Bill Crocker, Pat Quinn, Matt Stahlek, and 
junior Greg O'Connor stroll through the Eastfield 
Mall over the summer, looking for school clothes. 




Why go home and do homework? Instead, do what 
friends Sue Withington and Debbie Courtney are doing, 
staying after to watch their friends on the Varsity boys 
soccer team. 



L 




You've Got A Friend 



When one looks 
back on their four 
years in high 
school, what they tend to 
remember (besides the 
cafeteria's green rocks- I 
mean beans) are their 
friendships. Friends can 
sometimes be a large factor 
in how you act and some- 
times- what you wear. 
Sophomore Kerry Manning 
says "1 always bring my 
friends to go clothes shop- 
ping to get their opinions." 
But others, like Beth Sager, 
just dress in the mood 
they're in that morning." 

Friendships involve many 
things- usually the good, 
the bad, and the ugly. Seri- 
ously though, students 
spend most of their four 
years with their friends. 
They go to parties, go to the 
movies, to Friendly's, or 
maybe just to each others 
houses to watch a movie or 
play a game. "Some of the 
best times I've had this 
year," says senior Karianne 
Kraus, "are when we were 
over Chrissy Froehlich's 



house just to watch movies. 
Sophomore Sara Taylor 
agrees. "You don't always 
have to go out to have a 
good time." But others en- 
joy parties every weekend. 
You can usually find the en- 
tire football team at Sares' 
house after a victory or you 
can find a party going on 
somewhere in Wilbraham 
or Hampden. 

Probably the most impor- 
tant friendship you could 
have in high school is your 
"best friend." It's true that 
this sometimes changes, 
but by graduation, there is 
usually someone you call 
your best friend. Best 
friends are usually the ones 
you gossip with, tell your 
deepest, darkest secrets to, 
call at three a.m. when 
you're lonely, or just know 
that they are there when 
you need them. "Mif and 1 
have been best friends for- 
ever," says senior Linda 
Herbert of her best friend, 
Jennifer Doyle. 'We're 
more like sisters than 
friends." Says senior Peter 



Spellios of his best friend, 
sophomore Bill Fridlington. 
"We have a lot of fun to- 
gether. We always get 
along." 

Friends don't always 
have to get along though. 
They probably have some 
of the most heated argue- 
ments. True friendships can 
stand this. And usually in 
the end, the friendship is 
even stonger than before . 
You couldn't imagine the 
future without your best 
friend being there with you. 
Says Jeff Zahr of his best 
friend, Mike Tarantino, "We 
are going to room together 
at UMASS and most of the 
other schools we are apply- 
ing to are the same." 

In twenty years, when 
looking back on your high 
school career, most high 
school students will prob- 
ably remember their best 
friend-now living in Utah or 
Kansas or maybe next 
door or maybe at a party at 
Jason Sares' house! 



How many people were 
wounded during the at- 
tempted assasination of 
President Reagan on March 
30, 1981? 



£ 


1 would say 
three. — 

Eric Schmitt. 






^7^ 

lA 


"Two?!?!" — 

Anthony 

Desjardins 




"Ten, right?' 
— Monica 

Maltby 



Answer: three 



£ 



After telling them he was a 
rich lawyer, Steve f iedler is 
harassed for money by kids 
on a boat in France. 

Idoia Markina and Mary 
Beth Jacobs enjoy a stroll 
along the outside of Idoia's 
home in San Sebastian, 
Spain 





Mia Robinson and Kirsten Vinson ex- 
plore the vineyards located in the 
Beaujolais region of France whfch is 
known for making dry, red wine. 



HEAVY METAL is 
one of our many 
sounds. Motley 
Crue, Guns n 
Roses, Poison, An- 
thrax, 
Bon 
Jovi, 
are 
but a 
few of 
t h e 
loud 
party- 
i n g 
bands. 

Shadoe Stevens 
has given Top 40 a 
new voice. Phil Col- 
lins, Def Leppard, 
OMD, and Informa- 
tion Society have 
all frequented 96.5 
and 102.1, provid- 
ing headaches to 




our elders, while 
pleasantly distract- 
ing us. Our dances 
have included fa- 
vorites such as, 
Twist- 
n - 
Shout, 
Pour 
Some 
Sugar 
O n 
M e , 
and 
Stand 
by Me. 
Some of us have 
found retreat in 
bands like De- 
peche Mode, the 
Cure, the Smiths, 
Midnight Oil and 
even old time fa- 
vorites like the 
Beatles, Led Zep- 



plin, the Doors, and Bob Marley. 
Music finds its way into all of our 
lives — on radio, stereos, com- 
pact discs, and on MTV (the mu- 
sic authority). 

Without music, how could we 
possibly do our homework, 
study for midterms, get into that 
mellow mood, or dance with 
that special someone at the 
semi-formal, flow could we pos- 
sibly survive at the beach or 
driving in our cars without our 
favorite tunes blasting every- 
where? The answer is simple, 
we couldn't! 

Music is an important part of 
everyone's lives, and years from 
now when we have our own 
kids, their tastes won't be for 
iriXS, U2, and White Lion; in- 
stead they will be listening to 
the new groups of their genera- 
tion. 



The first normal food they've had in weeksl Katie Dennis, Mia 
Robinson, Mary Wallace, Olivier Stauffer, and Denise Harris enjoy 
McDonald's at a park in Geneva, Switzerland. It's a change from 
the french food they have been eating for the past few weeks. 



A 




It's A Small World 



Imagine two and a half 
weeks with no McDon- 
ald's, no Pizza Hut and 
no Friendly's. When 
the twelve of us went over 
to Villefranche-sur-Saone, 
we had none of these. Pizza 
is something every Ameri- 
can teenager takes for 
granted. But it never tasted 
as good as the night I re- 
turned home from France. 
The French may be noted 
for their gourmet cuisine, 
but pizza is something they 
still need to work on. The 
crust is thick and biscuit 
like, and there is no sauce. 
Instead they use whole to- 
matoes. There is no 
cheese, no pepperoni, no 
hamburg. They put things 
such as anchovies, sar- 
dines, ham, parsley, and 
whole olives. It was not 



what we were expecting. 
There were no McDonald's 
in the small villages that we 
were staying in,so the day 
we went to Geneva that's 
where we went. We were 
surprised to see beer on the 
menu and very shocked to 
pay two dollars for a large 
Coke. But that's the price to 
pay for good, ail-American 
food. 

Although many of us 
were forced to sit through 
meals of unidentifiable 
meat, prepared in strange 
ways, it didn't seem to mat- 
ter in comparison to the 
fact that we were in Europe. 
It was difficult to communi- 
cate with some people, but 
most of the Frenchmen 
were very patient and will- 
ing to make us feel at 
home. 



Mary Beth Jacobs had 
her own European vacation 
this summer. She spent the 
month of August in San Se- 
bastian, in the north of 
Spain with Idoia Markina. 
Idoia spent the last aca- 
demic year here at Minne- 
chaug. Even though Mary 
Beth didn't know Idoia very 
well, she had this to say of 
her trip to Spain: "When I 
went to Spain, I realized 
how much Idoia and I had 
in common. We used to 
spend hours just looking at 
the sea and talking. Even 
though we were growing up 
in two different countries 
and have different prob- 
lems, Idoia and 1 are very 
much alike. American teen- 
agers are the same as teen- 
agers all over the world. 





Aboard a boat in Anacy, France, Kirsten Vin- 
son plays Chinese jumprope with some of the 
kids she met on board. This was a welcome 
change from all of the sightseeing and muse- 
ums they had been seeing. "The trip opened 
my eyes to a different culture, and helped me 
appreciate some of the things we take for 
granted in America. - ' It is sadly true, we do 
take a lot of things for granted. 

In the rain at the Palace of Versaille are Kiki 
Yamer, Mary Wallace, Mia Robinson, Aimee 
Stone, Michelle Jones, Francis Truitt, Troy La- 
due, Steve Fiedler, Katie Dennis, Denise Har- 
ris, Kirsten Vinson, Olivier Stauffer, Lee Hig- 
ginbottom and Mr. McCarthy. 



The Bay of Biscay serves as background for a family photo 
of Mary Beth Jacobs and her Spanish family. Mary Beth 
spent the month of August in Spain visiting Idoia Markina 
who was an exchange student at Minnechaug last year. 




& 



You're ask- 
ing the wrong 
person!" 



m 



For some 
reason I real- 
ly want to say 
the 49'ers" 

— Marianne 
Marchesseault 



f. 



The Wash- 
ington Reds- 
kins" 

— Rob Estrada 



■■ 




; 


"The Giants' 


u* 


— Chris Baer 




'he San Frar. 















1 J 


What year 


did Peter Jen- 


nings become sole anchor 


and senior 


editor of ABC 


Dews? 




■ 


JK 


"1978, How 


JrH 


am I 


| ? 1 


supposed to 


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know?" 


M 


— Debbie 


9K. A d 


Tupek 



Matt Scarlett, Brenden Halloran, 
Mark Kulis, Kenny Wiegel, William 
Szafarowicz, Chris Lucarelle, Griff 
noble, Keith Lopez, and Edward 
Harris wait by the side of the road 
for the Peach Festival floats to go 
by, so they can make their way 
back to the festival grounds. 

We can do it! Carolee Salerno tries 
hard to get the final tire around 
the pole to win the School Spirit 
contest at the Peach Festival; Ka- 
tie Burke cheers her on with en- 
couraging words. Other schools 
competing were East Longmea- 
dow, Monson, and Palmer. 




"1978" — 
John Kapner 



WW 



1983, of 



Mary 
Jp ? ' La Pierre 




"1984" — 
Bree Forcier 



Answer: 1983 








PEACH FESTIVAL 



SOAP OPERAS have interfered with many an extra 
help session. Some of us have rushed home from 
school at 1:51 daily to see if Steve and Kayla are to- 
gether, or if Cruz is still alive. While others tune in to 
channel 28, MTV. Hightime television can also interrupt 
homework. Rather than state what day of the week it is, 
we can know it is Monday by ALP, Tuesday by Who's the 
Boss and Moonlight- _ = _____ in 9' Wednesday by 
Head of the Class f^^™ I and Dynasty, and 
Thursday by Cosby, I I L.A. Law, and Cheers. 

Friday night is when I I we rush to Movie Club 

3, H. O. T., Manny's, ^ '" or the Wilbraham 

Movie Shop to pick our video selections for the week 
end. Die Hard, The Best of Chevy Chase, Ho Way Out, 
Crocodile Dundee, Fatal Attraction, Full Metal Jacket, 
and Bright Lights, Big City, mixed with Smartfood and 
Cheetos equal an enjoyable evening with friends. 




NT 



J 



don t see anyone moving yet! Jen Pat- 
terson waits for the Peach Festival Pa- 
rade to start so she can sell raffle tickets 
for Key Club. 



Catch the Spirit 



Each year the Peach 
Festival sponsors a 
School Spirit Compe- 
tition, which demonstrates 
students' athletic ability, 
agility, and school spirit. 

This year's competitors 
were from East Longmea- 
dow, Minnechaug, Cathe- 
dral, Ludlow, Monson, and 
Palmer. The main objective 
of the competition is to en- 
dorse teamwork and school 
spirit. 

Events consisted of a 
sack race, socquet, para- 
medic pastime, beach ball 
boogie, the peach shuffle, 
and the Friendly Fundae 
Sundae. Also at the Peach 
Festival, were various forms 
of entertainment for all 
ages; such as the Chinese 
acrobats, the Irish dancers, 
a train ride, a children's pa- 
rade, the Springfield Pops, 
and many different game, 
food, and craft booths. The 
main attraction was record- 
ing star Marie Osmond, 
who performed on Saturday 
night. 



Looking around the fair- 
grounds, one found Minne- 
chaug students such as 
Mike Sargent, Heather 
Wages, Mike Jackson, and 
Stephanie Pietryka working 
for the Key Club running 
the game booth or selling 
raffle tickets; Katie Raczka, 
riicole Brady, and Amber 
Quist painting faces at the 
cheerleader's booth; and 
Ann Counos, Michele Ken- 
nedy, and Amy Fitzgerald 
selling cotton candy for the 
class of '89. At the Boy 
Scouts' dunking booth, you 
could find students and 
teachers such as Jeff Der- 
navich, and Art Tipaldi, will- 
ing to get dunked for a good 
cause. 

Although the weather 
didn't hold to permit the 
Sunday night fireworks dis- 
play, the spirit of the festi- 
val still proved to be strong. 
If the festival isn't remem- 
bered for its events, it will 
be remembered for the spir- 
it and dedication shown by 
the people involved. 





We certainly have spirit! The Varsity 
cheerleaders make their way past the 
Village Store and past excited specta- 
tors watching the Peach Festival Parade 
in the center of Wilbraham, on Saturday, 
September 3. Watch the Peach Festival 
Parade on Saturday, September 3. 

Peach Queen Andrea Pietryka and Prin- 
cess Kelly Thomas stop to smile for the 
camera while they make their rounds at 
Wilbraham's Labor Day Peach Festival. 



PEACH FESTIVAL 







^SSr\ ^W ■**"*• *« *« *J I 



On a slow summer afternoon, Becky Emerle waits at the 
register in the Springdale Mall Papa Gino's for the din- 
ner crowd to arrive. Business is usually slow in the after- 
noon but this is ridiculous. "May I help someone, 
please? Anyone, anyone?" 

"Welcome to the Tan Club" is the greeting you will 
usually get from Kari Chamberlain and Kristen Phillips. 
They are employed part time here along with Barrie 
Crocker and Sue Stevenson. 








r ; 


i 




After a busy lunch hour at Friendly's in 
the Eastfield Mall, Peter Spellios re- 
trieves some hamburger buns from the 
supply room in the back, preparing him- 
self for the dinner rush of hungry mall 
employees and shoppers. 



AFTER SCHOOL SMACKS are 
for some of us the biggest and 
maybe only meal of the day. It 
really doesn't matter what you 
eat, it's just the fact that it is food. 
Snacks such as cold pizza, Cool 
Ranch Doritoes, microwave pop- 
corn, Cape Cod potato chips, 
Oreos, goldfish, and M&M's are 
some of the numerous edibles 
that we devour after a long, gruel- 
ing day at Chaug. The one and 
only thing that keeps us from 
ruining our appetites for dinner is 
the constant nagging from our 
parents to discontinue our eating. 
This in itself rarely works. 







ALL THE HELP WE CAN 
GET 



As students enter 
high school, they 
usually experience 
a rude awakening- 
they need money. And as 
age 16 rolls around, Mom 
and Dad aren't as apt to 
part with their funds-which 
leaves one alternative (dare 
I say it?) A JOB! Most stu- 
dents choose Eastfield Mall 
as their place of employ- 
ment. Senior Kim Eaton can 
be found in Sears Credit 
Central. "1 have to work a 
lot." she says. "But the 
people are nice and the 
money is GREAT!!" If you 
stroll down to Anderson Lit- 
tle, you'll find senior Penny 
Qriswold and junior Dave 
Desimone. 'Anderson Lit- 
tle is great," Fenny says. "I 



have a lot of fun, especially 
when my friends come to 
visit me." If you continue 
down the mall to Sacketts, 
you will find senior Katie 
Dennis and sophomore Bill 
Fridlington. If you look next 
door to Friendly's, you will 
find sophomore Karrie Mur- 
phy, junior riikki Keller, and 
senior Keri Belliveau. "My 
favorite part about working 
here," riikki says, "is meet- 
ing nice customers and get- 
ting good tips." Junior Ei- 
leen Blomberg and senior 
John Chambers can be 
found at CVS, while senior 
Shannon Martin can be 
found at Thorn McCan. "I 
have to work." Shannon 
says, "1 have to support a 
car." If you drop by Up's-n- 



Down's, you might see sen- 
iors Kim Diatolevi and Kiki 
Yamer. Seniors Laurie Wy- 
sik, Michele Kennedy, Jen 
Doyle, and junior Amy Da- 
vidson will be glad to assist 
you if you stop by the Gap. 
Elsewhere in Wilbraham: 
you can find seniors Mike 
Tarantino, Tina Farrah, 
Sheila Gallagher, juniors 
Tara Wholly and Susan 
Fiedler , and sophomores 
Kim Venne and Maribeth Li- 
berty (Phew!!!) at the Village 
Store in the center of town. 
Mike seems to agree with 
everyone in saying "Work is 
fun, but 1 wouldn't be doing 
it if I didn't need the mon- 
ey." 




Although the mall is a prime hangout place, it is also a 
place where you can find many of the different Minnechaug 
students working. 



Senior Marianne Marchesseault will gladly ring 
up your purchase at the Weathervane in the 
Eastfield Mall. 





Jeff Zahr works happily at his 
summer job at Lechmere in the 
Springdale Mall 

Senior Michele Kennedy care- 
fully, (oopsl) folds sweaters at 
her part time job at the Gap in 
the Eastfield Mall. 



What was the albu 
year in 1984? 




Pyromania" 

— Jason 
Bergeron 



£5 



1984 by Van 
Halen." 

— MacQregor 
Smith 



I i 



"Wasn't it Mi- 
chael Jack- 
son's Thrill- 
er?" 

— Keely 

Fitzgerald 





"Purple 
Rain " 

— Sheila 
Gallagher 




Answer: Michael Jackson's 
Thriller 



fr 



Two more minutes left. The last two 
minutes of the day always seem to be 
the longest two minutes of our lives. 
We can't wait to get home. 




What are we going to do? After the first yearbook meeting, Keely 
Fitzgerald stays late to finish her list of ideas for the student life 
section. 

Missy Moreno waits outside of her H-hall homeroom on the first day 
of school. She just can't wait to see some familiar faces from last 
year. 



r 



FASHION and style are worries of teenagers. To a lot of stu- 
dents, it doesn't matter what they wear as long as it's obvious 
that it is ESPRIT, Benetton, Liz Claiborne, Vision Street Wear, 
Bugle Boy, Vuarnet, Guess?, Gap, A. O. White, Outback Red, 
River Trader, B. D. Baggies, or Calvin Klein. Others wear what is 
in good taste to them, which may include college sweatshirts, 
rock T-shirts, leather jackets, boxer shorts, ripped 
stonewashed jeans, short pleated miniskirts, or jean jackets. 

Even a person's shoes can make a statement. Around Minne- 
chaug, a person will find shoe styles ranging from docksiders to 
high tops. The name brands on shoes are just as important as 
the name brands on clothes. The most popular names around 
Minnechaug are Eastland, Converse, Bass, Dexter, ReeBok, 
Tretom, and Keds. Whether it be simple, white Keds or bright, 
red Cons, the shoes that a person wears says a lot about that 
person. 

Whether we realize it or not, our last decision before we go to 
sleep, or our first decision in the morning is what we are going 
to wear to school, no matter what look you are trying to 
acheive, great time and effort seems to go into everyone's style. 
Even though people usually don't like to admit it, fashion is 
important to all. After all, first impressions are lasting ones. 




FIRST DAY 



Back To School Again? 



What was the movie of the 
year in 1985? 



It seems like only yester- 
day, we were cleaning 
out our lockers and 
looking forward to the lazy 
days of summer. The only 
sweat we would be working 
up would be brought on by 
laying in the sun. Those 
days go by all too quickly, 
and we find ourselves back 
at Minnechaug. 

Familiar sounds fill the 
hallways . . . locker doors 
slamming shut, students 
asking . . "What block is 
is?", and freshmen afraid to 
ask, " Where's M-hall?". 
The bell rings, and we find 
ourselves wondering, 
'Where did the summer 

go?" 



The smell of cafeteria piz- 
za permeates the halls. The 
school hasn't changed 
much in the three months 
since I last saw it, but some 
of the characters are differ- 
ent. Last year's juniors 
have taken the place of the 
seniors who have departed 
for college and jobs away 
from Minnechaug. Several 
sophmore guys seem to 
have grown over the sum- 
mer and the girls all notice 
who they are! A new crop of 
freshman arrive looking 
younger than ever. A cou- 
ple of unfamiliar faces re- 
veal some new move-ins to 
town. Almost everyone 
sports a golden tan with a 



story behind it. 

You can tell its the first 
day of school by the new 
clothes, the clean and emp- 
ty notebooks and the bright 
white of everyone's recently 
acquired ReeBoks. Nost of 
us resolve to do our home- 
work and get better grades 
and the most important 
question of the day, "What 
lunch are you in?", is re- 
peated hundreds of times. 
Teachers and students 
seem to be on their best be- 
havior and smiles reveal a 
friendly atmosphere. Mo, 
Minnechaug hasn't 
changed much since we left 
in June, and for right now, 
its good to be back! 





"Indiana 


t* 


Jones and 


r- T, 


1 the Temple 


' \ 


1 of Doom" 


— Rob Williams 


1 .v\ rn.H 


J 




E.T. 







The familiar look of our school during autumn. 



Before the second homeroom bell rings, best friends 
Jeff Dernavich and Mike Pietryka discuss their plans 
for the upcoming weekend. 



^^W 


"Back to the 


#* 


Future? I 




think. I don't 


know, how 


_^" 


am I 


4L i 


supposed to 


know that?" 




— Chris Morissette 




An enthusiastic welcome back to the senior class of 
'89, wishing them a memorable year. Best of luck in 
the futurel 







John Capter, C.J. Holt and Tony 
Desjandins enjoy each others 
company as they chat during 
lunch. 




INTERESTS. We all have them, but who has time to be interest- 
ed in anything outside of school? WE, the students of Minnechaug 
do! While most students balance a heavy course load, they still 
find the time to play a sport or just have fun with their friends. It's 
tough to maintain decent grades and still be active in outside 
activities, but most of us find a way to do it! When asked what they 
were interested in outside of their schoolwork most responded 
enthusastically. Kathy Hoffman replied, "Outside of school, I am 
involved in cheerleading and student government. But what I 
enjoy the most is going out with my friends on the weekends.'' 
Most kids will tell you that going out on the weekend is their 
favorite thing to do. Some of us even have a favorite hang-out. 
Chris Zeo tells us that he likes going to Jason Sares' house and 
listening to Chris Albano's stories. 

SOME students find sports or playing an instrument a way to 
vent from their everyday frustrations. Mike Schmidt likes to play 
the drums after he finishes his schoolwork. Me also enjoys playing 
hockey for the varsity hockey team. Other students take an active 
interest in promoting school and class morale. Football is impor- 
tant to Jason Sares, but he also encourages friends to drop by on 
the WEEKENDS for get-togethers. 

A LOT of students are interested and involved in clubs and 
organizations. Rob Williams says that he likes to attend Key Club 
meetings every Thursday night. 

SPORTS, getting together on the WEEKENDS, playing instru- 
ments, and participating in CLUBS makes for a diverse student 
body. Finding the time to involve ourselves in outside activities 
helps make Minnechaug more than just a place to develop our 
intellect. 




Looking distressed. Amy Stone throws her 
hands up in the air since she forgot her lunch 
and really did not want to finish the lunch that 
she had bought from the cafeteria. Tomorrow 
she'll definitely remember her brown bag 
lunch. 




LUNCHTIME 
AGAIN 



10:55 — the bell rings. 
For a lucky few — that 
means lunchtime! 
Lunchtime at Minnechaug 
brings mixed reactions 
from many people. Amy 
Jenkinson finds lunch to be 
a "repulsive experience. I 
always bring my own 
lunch." Others have just 
accepted it. "It's okay/' 
says Chris Agnew, "some of 
the lunches aren't that bad. 
A trip to Mrs. Robinson's D- 
block art class will bring 
you upon an in-depth dis- 
cussion over the school 
lunch. 

"What's for lunch?" yells 
Kelli Thomas from across 
the room. 

"Hamburgers and rice." 
Danielle Couture yells 
back. 

"Rice? I love their rice. I 
think I'll get a double order 
today." 

"What do you rate to- 
day's lunch?" 



"Definitely a four and a 
half, maybe even a five." 
Kelli answers. 

And the discussion con- 
tinues. Although many stu- 
dents do not get as involved 
in the school lunches as 
they do, we have to deal 
with it. The lunch line is 
definite proof that most of 
us have grown to accept the 
school lunches. However, 
the longer the line is, the 
longer you have to talk with 
your friends that you do not 
see during the rest of the 
day. Only problem is, once 
we get our food, there are 
only five minutes left in the 
lunch period for us to eat. 
Sometimes lunch can be a 
real hassle, but for most of 
us, we just have to accept it 
as a reality, and then there 
are those select few who ac- 
tually enjoy it. 




1 "Stand by 
I Me" 

— Tara Reave\ 



Kelli Thomas, Danielle Couture, 
and Kari Chamberlain talk while 
enjoying their favorite period of 
the day, lunch. 

Dineen Parker finishes her lunch 
and waits a few minutes before 
she eats her cookie for dessert. 



mF\ Back to the 

j ^m Future, of 
!V- wu 1 course." 

— Michelle 
Beaupre 








Answer: Back to the Future 




LUNCH 


o 



What were the proceeds from 
the song That's What Friends 
are For dedicated for? 












f " Big 
/ 1 - -J Brothers/ 
? >J ' '* Sisters" 

— Courtney 


Big 

Ware 



Who is that behind this hair? Steve 
Axiotis gets into the spirit of Hal- 
loween, by dressing up for school. 



Monster 
Mash 




Leukemia" 

- Denise Lesniak 





"Mothers 
Against 
Drunk 
Driving" 

— Tia Rovithis 



■ " AIDS 

ML- III Research" 

— Christy Talbot 








Answer: AIDS Research 


$ 


HALLOWEEN 





Every October 31st, a 
strange thing hap- 
pens in the halls of 
Minnechaug Regional High 
School. Those students 
with the urge to be different 
choose Halloween to wear 
the strangest, most bizarre 
costumes they can think of 
to be different than the oth- 
ers. 

Halloween is a day for us 
to be ourselves, to let out 
that person in us that de- 
sires to be different from 
our usual Minnechaug exte- 
rior. Instead of the jeans, 
sweaters, and designer 
clothes, we forget our fash- 
ion conscience appearance 
and show the little bit of 
strangeness that is hidden 



inside of each and every 
one of us. 

Heather Wages showed 
her originality in her Alice 
in Wonderland costume. 
Kristen Mastroianni and 
Kim Diotalevi dressed up as 
Mouskeeters from the Mick- 
ey Mouse Club. Kristen Pis- 
conieri went all out in her 
Raisin man outfit. Christine 
Martin and Jessica Gianan- 
toni came as Raggedy Ann 
and Andy. Kelli Thomas 
used her soccer "injury" to 
her advantage, she came as 
a boxer with a very believ- 
able black eye. Every year 
the costumes seem to be 
more and more bizarre, 
can't wait for next year . . . 




Reliving the 60s, Jeff O'Shaughnessy and Brett 
Knowles promote a well-known slogan of that time. 



Jessica Gianantoni a.k.a. Raggedy Ann, enjoys her 
Halloween candy (although she shouldn't be eating 
it in the library). 




Christine Martin as Raggedy Andy. 



W ■ mw 



In the heavy metal look, Kurt Chenaille takes ad- 
vantage of Halloween. Me sees it as a day to be 
different, and he certainly is. 




Susan Raffaele, a flower child, was one of the 
many seniors that remembered the years of 
peace during the 1960s, this past Halloween. 



HALLOWEEN 







How many golds did Carl Lewis 
win in both the 1984 and 1988 
Summer Olympics? 



Working hard the day before school 
started, senior class president Tom 
Mango helps clean the courtyard for 
the Senior Kick-off Dance. 



Helping the yearbook, Bethany 
Sager and Kara Ruscio bring in 
film to have it developed. 



At the Teddy Bear Picnic this fall, 
Chrissy Froehlich works for Key 
Club at the face-painting booth. 



"4, I told 
you to ask 
me a 

question I 
could 
answer." 

— Kirsten Root 





Lending a 
Hand 



£ 


"12. You 
mean all 
medals, 
right?" 

— Tom Mango 








Answer: 6 gold med 


als 


3 


VOLL 


NTEERS 





Tia Rovithis gives up a Saturday 
morning to work at the Wilbraham 
Children's Museum's Teddy Bear Pic- 
nic. Here she helps the children 
make bear hats for themselves out of 
paper bags. 



Whether we know 
it or not, we all 
volunteer our 
time to helping out. It 
could be a friend in need, 
a class project, or be- 
coming involved in 
school clubs and the 
community. 

During school, many 
students fill up their 
studies by helping out a 
favorite teacher for that 
block. These students 
can be found in the AV 
Office running off tests 
and dittos, or correcting 
papers that the teacher 
did not have time to do 
themselves. Being an 
aide has its advantages, 
because you are not tied 
down to being in a class 
for an entire period, you 
can be up and around 
the school running er- 
rands. 

On weekends, stu- 
dents volunteer their 
time to helping out 



around the house, baby- 
sitting for the neighbors, 
or giving up their spare 
time to help out a club. 
The Key Club at Minne- 
chaug is a good example 
of a volunteer club. Its 
members are always 
helping out the commu- 
nity. 

Laughing Brook is also 
another place where you 
can find students lending 
a hand. Most important- 
ly, lending a hand means 
being there when you are 
in need. The students at 
Minnechaug are always 
around to help a friend 
who needs someone to 
be there for them. We 
can always count on our 
friends to make the best 
out of a bad situation. 

No matter where you 
go in Wilbraham or 
Hampden, you will al- 
ways be able to find a Fal- 
con giving up some their 
free time to lend a hand. 




Volunteer work can be fun. Entrance to the Senior Kick-Off Dance. 



Kirsten Vinson works hard washing cars at the Key 
CLub Car Wash. 



VOLUNTEERS 



3 



What do you think caused the 
exceptionally warm summer in 
'88 and the mild, almost snow- 
less winter of '89? 












Jf\ ^he 

\ disappea 

^L* _ 0r ozone 
i ^^Hr^N ' layer." 

K:. ■. _J1 - Tar 


ring 

a Daly 




"What do I 
think caused 
it? I've no 
clue. I don't 
know." 

— Jen Riek 



n 



H 



I Greenhouse 

! Effect" 

— Terry 
Tousignant 



fl* 



The sun" 

— Rob Estrada 



Answer: The Greenhouse 
Effect 



$ 



AFTERSCHOOL 




Spare Time 



Before basketball practice, Steve 
Fiedler and Kevin Trombly stop in 
at the Village Store to pick up 
some food for after practice. 

Tom Mango relaxes in the library 
before practice by reading a news- 
paper so that he can study for his 
history current events test the fol- 
lowing day. 



1:51! The bell has just 
rung. Now what do we 
do? The answer is easy. 
Homework is definitely out 
of the question. Mow are we 
going to spend our Tree, 
unscheduled time" from 
now until tomorrow at 7:30 
A.M. when the first bell 
rings? 

Well, some of us aren't 
lucky enough to have uns- 
cheduled time. Over one 
hundred of Chaug's stu- 
dents participate in sports, 
and practices take up most 
of their afternoon. 

Then there are all of the 
students that belong to a 
club. COPE, Key Club, and 
Art Club all meet at sched- 
uled times, so if we belong 
to any of these clubs, we 
have to work our schedule 
around them. There are so 
many different activities to 
get involved in to keep you 



busy. 

But if you are one of 
those students who has no 
interest in that stuff, then 
what do you do? Some kids 
have jobs in order to earn 
money so that they can go 
out on the weekends. Oth- 
ers just go home, kick their 
shoes off, and relax in front 
of the television with the 
snack of their choice. 

The phone lines seem to 
light up at 2:15 when most 
students are home or at a 
friend's house. Then there 
are those students who are 
either too overworked by 
the day at school or com- 
pletely bored, that they go 
home to get some sleep. 

Whatever these Minne- 
chaug students are doing, 
is definitely not thinking 
about things that are 
school-related (well, at 
least not until after dinner). 



Trying to find someone's picture, Kellie Razcka 
helps out the yearbook staff after school at a 
Tuesday meeting. 





Working on the Senior Section. 



Studying hard in the library. 




Supporting the home team. 



A cheer for the falcons. 




£&*'/ 







Mike Sargent studies his English vocabulary af- , 
terschool, while waiting to rehearse his part in the J*l J5» 




On a fresh autumn day. Karianne 
Kraus, Kirsten Root, and Jackie 
Bushway lend support to the 
boy's varsity soccer team, after 
cross-country practice. 

Lori Estrada spends her after- 
noons chatting with her friends on 
the phone about what had hap- 
pened during the course of her 
day. 



AFTERSCMOOL 



& 



Chris Baer, Shaun Cole, Jessica 
Winn, and Day Devine among oth- 
ers, watch another close Falcon 
football game with great intensity. 

Waiting for the next cheer to start, 
J.V. cheerleader, Bridget Baron, 
watches the J.V. team play on a 
cold afternoon. 




Watching from the sidelines. Lending support to the soccer team. Chris Hanrahan sings his heart out while imitating his fa- 

vorite group on Halloween. 



SCHOOL SPIRIT 



Give a Cheer for 
Minnechaug 



Some students at Min- 
nechaug wonder what 
we mean when we talk 
about school spirit. We 
don't have pep rallies any- 
more or spirit weeks; so 
just how do we show our 
true Falcon spirit? 

The loss of the pep rally 
was a major disappoint- 
ment to the students at 
Chaug. The chance for 
each class to display their 
spirit was gone. For the 
class of '92, the loss of the 
pep rally is not as big a deal 
to them as it was for the 
class of '89. Although every 
class missed out on this an- 
nual spiritual event, the 
seniors were denied their 
right to be the most obnox- 
ious and loudest that they 
could possibly be. 



Even though the pep rally 
is gone, the students have 
found other ways to demon- 
strate their school spirit. 
Quite often you will see 
supportive fans attending 
the sporting events. You 
don't have to be playing a 
sport to feel a part of the 
game, you can be just as 
involved by cheering on the 
home team. 

Dances are another way 
that the students show 
their Falcon spirit. The 
school dances are a time to 
be with friends and be as 
rowdy as you'd like. There 
is no limit to the amount of 
noise that the gym can han- 
dle. 

Each class displays its 
own amount of spirit too. 
The freshman class showed 



how they can pull together 
when they dethroned the 
seniors at the Battle of the 
Classes dance. The juniors 
worked together selling 
boxes of fruit to build up 
their funds for next years 
activities. But the class that 
has shown the most spirit 
this year was the senior 
class, not only did the offi- 
cial Senior Skip Day hap- 
pen, it was a true success. 
On February 1, 1989, 84 per- 
cent of the senior class was 
not in attendance. A defi- 
nite school record. 
Although we may lack the 
'tradition'' that some 
schools have, but we cer- 
tainly make up for that loss 
with a true spirit that comes 
from our hearts. 




Managers for the Varsity field hockey team, Jen Dearden and 
Barbara Vecchio, watch intensely as the team plays a very 
close game. 

Members of the boy's Varsity soccer team show their sup- 
port for the Falcon football team, by painting their faces 
green and white. 




Anne Berte 
and Mandy 
Kober enjoy a 
home field 
hockey game. 




Tim Burke and 
Heath Jackson 
take time out 
one afternoon 
to watch the 
girl's soccer 
game. 



Cheerleaders. 
Sue Messier 
and Amber 
Quist take 
time out from 
face painting 
to be 

interviewed for 
the evening 
news. 



SCHOOL SPIRIT 




Paul Fitzgerald, Will Withington, and 
Tom Fresz pose for a picture with 
their dates Keely Fitzgerald. Kerry 
Griffin, and Megan Farrell at the prom 
held at Chez Josef. 



Dave Manning and Kelli Porter 
sing along with the music as they 
dance among the crowd on the 
dance floor at the 1988 Prom. 



Scott Crimmins shows his stuff 
one last time before graduation. 



I've Had the Time 
of my Life 



*<§^ 



P re-prom parties at 
Mark Borsari's and 
Qina Alberici's started 
off the night of celebration 
for the class of 1988 and 
their prom dates. Smiles 
flashed for the cameras as 
we all checked out who was 
wearing what — what about 
that PLAID CUMBER- 
BUND?!? Even though 
styles were varied, there 
was a feeling of unity that 
the night contained as we 
danced to such songs as 
"Twist and Shout", "Louie, 
Louie", and one of the fa- 
vorites according to Megan 
Farrell, was "Piano Man" by 
Billy Joel. Another class of 
'88 member, Paul Fitzger- 
ald, said that the peom at 
Chez Josef was, "definitely 
a night that I'll remember." 
No short-cuts were taken 
that night. A falcon carved 
out of ice was the center- 
piece and the food was deli- 



cious. The night was made 
complete by the sight of the 
class advisor, Mr. Kibbe 
and his roving V.C.R. He 
said that the night was a 
definite success. Everyone 
there arrived safely and re- 
turned hove to a variety of 
post-prom parites that last- 
ed into the early morning, 
and in some cases, over- 
night. Limos were lined up 
outside of the banquet hall 
waiting for the numerous 
couples that rented them 
for the evening. 

The most popular post- 
prom parties were both Me- 
gan Farrell's and Denis Dur- 
an's. Unfortunately it rained 
the next day so all plans to 
head down to Misquamicut 
were ruined. 

However, it is almost una- 
mious when remembering 
the class of 1988s prom, we 
definitely "HAD THE TIME 
OF OUR LIFE!" 



Karen Rose 
requests what 
she thinks is a 
good dance 
song. 




Gina Alberici 
struts along in 
the big chain. 



Meredith Rothschild and Greg 
Geldart move with the pace of the 
train. 



Lauren Krzesik and Mark Borsari 
really enjoy themselves at the 
prom. 



$ 




The graduates 
wait to receive 
their diplomas. 




Gina Alberici 
gives a speech to 
the graduating 
classs of '88. 



The 1988 
graduates pose 
for a picture in 
their caps and 
gowns. 



The Day Has Finally 
Arrived 



As always, a senior 
class graduation is 
something special. 
Last year was no exception. 
The 1988 Minnechaug Re- 
gional Senior class cele- 
brated the final step of their 
high school careers on Fri- 
day, June 3, 1988 at Sym- 
phony Hall in Springfield. It 
was evident that careful 
planning went into this 
event because everything 
went smoothly. 

The evening began with 
presentations performed by 
both the chorus and the 
band. As they finished, nu- 
merous speeches were giv- 
en by the students and the 
faculty as the highly emo- 
tional seniors awaited their 



moment. 

Speeches were given by 
Andrea Fietryka, the class 
president, Gina Alberici, Su- 
san Singiser, and foreign 
exchange student Jill Ytter- 
stadt. A special speech was 
given by Mr. Badger as it 
was his last graduation as 
acting principal of Minne- 
chaug. 

Eventually, the highlight 
of this wonderful evening 
came as the seniors 
marched on stage to re- 
ceive their diplomas. Each 
individual expressed his or 
her joy as they walked off 
stage, no longer a student 
in high school. We wish the 
best of luck to each and ev- 
eryone of those former sen- 



iors as they prepare for the 
"real world". 

This year, the class of 
1989 will also be graduat- 
ing at Symphony Hall, in- 
stead of the tradition of 
graduating on the Minne- 
chaug football field, as oth- 
er classes have in the past. 
Although the class of 1988 
graduated at Symphony 
Hall, most classes prefer to 
graduate outside. One rea- 
son for the change might be 
the always present threat of 
inclement weather. Even 
though we will not be 
graduating outdoors, June 
9, 1989 will be the day that 
the class of '89 will be glad 
that they finally reached. 




Kim Hickey 
shows pride to be 
a graduate of the 
class of 1988. 



Mario Kober recalls the fond memo- 
ries that she has of the four years that 
she spent at Minnechaug. 



GRADUATlOri-1988 




\ J 




[ 


^l3Bt v 






& 






Rick Wyman proudly receives his diploma 
after four years of hard work and studying. 
All of this finally paid off; next step, college. 

Sonya Rhie serves as the grand marshal! 
for the 1988 Graduation, next year will be 
her turn to walk down the stage to receive 
her diploma. 



Shawn O'Connor proudly shakes Mr. 
Bagers hand after receiving his di- 
ploma. 



The Minnechaug chorus performs 
beautifully as they sing before the 
ceremonies. 



GRADUATION-1988 



$ 




Each sports season brings about an enthusiasm in the players as well 
as the fans. Whether we know it or not, we are all participants in the 
sports world. At first it was hard for us to contemplate that our football 
team won its first four games; but once the initial shock wore off, our pride 
and respect for the players and our school became apparent. This unex- 
pected winning streak lead us to never say never. 

Our school spirit allows us to enjoy a game even when we do lose. We 
sympathize with the teams that play their best and still fail to reach their 
desired goals. We all show respect for the losing teams and share in their 
hopes that they will win somewhere down the line. Even though it is nice to 
win once in a while, losing is also a part of life and SOMETHINGS NEVER 
CHANGE. 



Brett Knowles cheers on the Falcons as 
they achieve a first down during their 
game against Mt. St. Joseph Academy, 
which resulted in a victory. 




® 




SPORTS DIVIDER 



$ 



^ 









VARSITY BASEBALL TEAM. Front Row: Tom Fresz; Will 
Withington; Mark Borsari. Second Row: Jeff Luttrel; Mike 
Zhe; Dave Shea; Damn Bilik; Chris Morissette. Back Row: 
Mike Jarvis; Roger McMinn; Tom Mango; Brian Siddell; Jim 
Thompson; Lee Higginbottom; and Coach Andy Whalen. 



JUNIOR VARSITY BASEBALL TEAM. Front Row: Mike Li- 
garski; Carlos Crespo. Second Row: Brendon Welker; Eric 
Keeler; Kevin Blomstrom; Jason Walbridge; and Mark 
Streeter. Back Row: Chris Kuselias; Jay Jablonski; Jamie 
Connell; Chris Qoebel; Jack Welch, and Coach Greg Trim- 
mer. 



FRESHMAN BASEBALL TEAM. Front Row: James Troy; 
Roger Brunelle. Middle Row: Brian Dolaher; Ryan Barrett- 
Steve Belden; Jason Carr; and Damn Melcher. Back Row: 
Coach Don Duff; Steve Croteau; Chris Bertelli; Pat Gal- 
lagher; Brian Borsari; Chris Danielle; and Steve Meisner. 




J» 



I 







...» 



Brian Siddell winds up and pre- 
pares to fire a pitch. 




VARSITY 
BASEBALL 



Builds for next year 



Finishing its season with 6 wins and 12 losses, the team's first win 
was against East Longmeadow; the second, against South Hadley; 
the third a hard fought battle with West Springfield. 
Jim Thompson was on fire in the East Longmeadow game, striking out 
seventeen batters. Jeff Luttrell hit well during the season while Tom 
Presz took the team to the hill using every pitch in the book. 

After three weeks on the disabled list, Brian Siddell returned with 
zest. Sure-handed Will Withington played like a vacuum at second base, 
scooping up everything. The third baseman, Mark Borsari, added a fence 
hitting double in the East Longmeadow game and later contributed 
homeruns. Dave Shea, the right fielder, scored almost everytime he hit. 
On the whole, the team had difficulty hitting the baseball. However, 
Jim Thompson and Tom Mango each added grand slams: both of which 
were in losing efforts. Coach Andy Whalen has promising performers for 
the IS 




Cathedral 

Chicopee Comp 

South Hadley 

East Longmeadow 

Chicopee 

Ludlow 

Northampton 

Central 

West Springfield 

Westfield 

Longmeadow 

Amherst 



V 


SV 


FROSH 


Lost 


Lost 


Lost 
Lost 


Lost 


Lost 


Lost 
Lost 


Won 


Won 




Lost 


Lost 


Lost 


Won 


Won 




Won 


Won 


Won 


Lost 


Lost 




Lost 


Lost 


Lost 


Won 


Won 




Lost 






Lost 


Lost 


Lost 


Lost 


Lost 




Lost 


Lost 


Lost 


Lost 


Lost 




Lost 


Lost 


Lost 


Won 




Lost 


Won 


Lost 




Lost 


Lost 





Chris Goebel squares to bunt. 



Steve Belden completes his pitch- 
ing motion during warm-up. 



Brian Borsari prepares to swing at 
a pitch at his belt. 



$ 



Their togetherness had them bound for the 

PLAYOFFS 



With only five return- 
ing lettermen, the 
Varsity softball 
team got off to a shaky 
start. In the first six games, 
we went 2-4 with an embar- 
assing loss to Central. It 
was there that we learned 
about Fitzy's pitching tal- 
ents. For the rest of the sea- 
son, against teams in our 
division, we went 7-3 with a 
"sweet" victory over the 
league leading team, Chi- 
copee. 

When the team pulled to- 
gether, we got good hitting 
from Michelle Kennedy, 
Kellie Paluck, captain Mi- 
chele Kowalski, Linda Her- 
bert, Allie Mullett, and 
Kathy Horacek. There were 
many defensive standouts 
in Sara Taylor,, Cindy Roj, 



Amy Fitzgerald, Kristen 
Phillips and Di Tiffault, who 
made her debut in the out- 
field. Speedy, heads-up 
base running by Sue Ste- 
venson and Kristen Mas- 
troianni put us in scoring 
position when we needed it. 

The pitching was there 
most of the time with Lisa 
Kennedy going 8-3 and 
Diane Thiffault with an 
E.R.A. under 3. 

Next year we expect to be 
even better, although we 
will have lost our four out- 
standing seniors — Michele 
"Killer" Kowalski, Kellie 
Paluck, Cindy Roj, and 
Kathy Horacek. We will 
come back and challenge 
once again for the Western 
Mass Championship. 





VARSITY SOrTBALL TEAM. Front Row: Kellie Paluck; Kathy Horacek. 
Second Row: Sue Stevenson; Allie Mullett; Michele Kowalski; Cindy Roj; 
Linda Herbert, and Kristen Mastroianni. Back Row: Lisa Kennedy; Kris- 
tin Phillips; Diane Thiffault; Amy Fitzgerald; Sara Taylor; Michelle Ken- 
nedy, and Coach Art Tipaldi. 



c 



V SOFTBALL 
SCORES 



TEAM 


RESULTS 


Ludlow 


Won 


South Hadley 


Lost 


Northampton 


Won 


Central 


Lost 


Chicopee Comp 


Lost 


Chicopee 


Lost 


Holyoke 


Won 


Cathedral 


Won 


West Springfield 


Lost 


Westfield 


Won 


West Springfield 


Lost 


Chicopee Comp 


Won 


Chicopee 


Won 


Holyoke 


Won 


Westfield 


Won 


Cathedral 


Lost 



■I ife. 




Michelle Kennedy checks her foot- 
ing and thinks over the signs from 
Coach Tipaldi as she steps into 
the batter's box. 



fr 



VARSITY SOrTBALL 



Michele Kowalski executes a per- 
fect bund down the third base line 

in a very important game at Szot Lisa Kennedy winds up to fire a 
Park in Chicopee. pitch at the Chicopee game. 




T^SC- 











Kristen Phillips watches the ball 
intently as she prepares to start 
her swing. 



Kathy Horacek takes a pitch below Linda Herbert sets up to field a 

the knees for a ball. ball at second base. 



VARSITY SOFTBALL 



Six wins, five losses and two ties show 



FUTURE POTENTIAL 



JUNIOR VARSITY SOFT 
BALL TEAM. Front Row 
Judy Lussier; Jody Gar 
ceau; Vail Mosier. Sec 
ond Row: Jen McCarthy, 
Mandy Kober; Sarah 
Hsiao; Kristen Falsone 
Bridgette Felouze. Back 
Row: Coach Dan Balser, 
Tracy Grayer; Rachel 
Morton; Amy Sullivan, 
Krissy Albano; and Kee 
ly Fitzgerald. 







JV SOFTBALL 


TEAM 


WE THEY 


Ludlow 


46 1 


South Hadley 


12 16 


Northampton 


24 17 


Central 


25 20 


Chicopee Comp 


7 11 


Chicopee 


14 18 


Cathedral 


8 29 


Westfield 


10 8 


West 


24 13 


Springfield 




Chicopee Comp 


19 19 


Westfield 


7 8 


Hovyoke 


13 5 


Cathedral 


14 14 




Vail Mosier takes a pitch over her 
head for a ball. 

Judy Lussier completes a nice 
play at third base by throwing the 
runner out. 



Bridgette Pelouze prepares to 
step out of the batter's box after 
taking a ball high. 

Jody Garceau plants her feet and 
prepares to field the ball. 



I 



JV SOFTBALL 



Their dedication and desire result in 

IMPROVEMENT 



Sue Withington soars over a hur- 
dle. 



The 1988 Girls' Track 
Team, through hours 
of running, weight 
training, full and half 
"crunches,'' and pushups, 
improved at each meet, 
running faster, throwing far- 
ther, and jumping higher 
than ever before. Their 
dedication paid off in win- 
ning tough meets against 
Agawam and Chicopee 
Comp. Co-captains Patti 
OTieil (long distance) and 
Andrea Pietryka (throwing, 
high jump) led the team to 
its final record of two wins 
and seven losses, an im- 
provement over 1987s re- 
cord. 

There were several bright 
spots in the 1988 season: 



watching Tiffany Lyons win 
nearly every hurdle event, 
Marianne Manseau blow by 
her competitors in the 200, 
and, finally, Katie Burke, 
Amy Greene, and Marq Mo- 
sier sweep the 100, a feat 
they accomplished several 
times. When Katie, Amy, 
Marianne, and Marq 
teamed up in the 4x100 re- 
lay, they were invincible. 

The record can be ex- 
plained by the overall youth 
and inexperience. With only 
three seniors, they are still 
rebuilding to past glories. 
Coaches Hal Miller, Sue 
Petzold, and Anne Sy- 
manski worked on improv- 
ing each meet, not neces- 
sarily winning. 



Because the team lost 
only three seniors (Andrea, 
Patti, and Becky Agnew) 
and one other to prep 
school (Tiffany Lyons), the 
1989 outlook is bright. 
Some people and events to 
watch for are discus, (Kar- 
ianne Kraus); javelin, (Den- 
ise Vermette); shot put, 
(Laura White and Jackie 
Bushway); sprints, (Katie 
Burke, Amy Greene, Mari- 
anne Manseau, and Marq 
Mosier); middle distance, 
(Jessica Winn and Lisa Man- 
ning; long distance, (Becky 
Emerle and Francis Truitt; 
hurdles, (Sue Withington); 
and, of course, the 4x100 
relay team. 




GIRLS' TRACK 



TEAM 


WE 


THEY 


Westfield 


45 


90 


Longmeadow 


62 


76 


Cathedral 


51 


85 


Northampton 


40 


96 


Agawam 


69 


67 


West 


55 


81 


Springfield 






Chicopee 


79 


57 


Comp 






Amherst 


67.5 


68.5 



Amy Greene and Marq Mosier find 
time to relax at a meet. 

GIRLS' TRACK TEAM. Front Row: 
Kiki Yamer; Amy Greene; Jen 
Lech; Alexis Heede; Becky 
Emerle; Kirsten Vinson; Kim Ea- 
ton; Amy Barber; Pat OTieil; Ellen 
Sullivan; Tina Hill; Coach Hal Mill- 
er. Second Row: Frances Truitt; 
Lisa Manning; Carolee Salerno; 
Sue Solzak; Erica Kanzinger; 
Brandy Renn; Anju Reejsinghani; 
Kim Smith; Denise Lesniak; Katie 
Burke; Jessica Winn; Assistant 
Coach Anne Symanski. Third 
Row: Laura White; Anne Berte; 
nancy Bigos; Melissa Luttrell; Tif- 
fany Lyons; Monica Cook; Mary 
Beth Jacobs; Sue Hanrahan; Don- 
na McGrath; Debbie Courtney; 
Sue Withington; Mia Robinson. 
Back Row: Jill Turcotte; Courtney 
Ware; Erica Dutil; Jen Lynch; Nan- 
hee McMinn; Sara Demosthenous; 
Sue Fiedler; Anne Counos; Denise 
Vermette; Katie Dennis; Jackie 
Bushway; Becky Crocker; Mari- 
anne Manseau; Marq Mosier. 




GIRLS' TRACK 



High-hurdler Jeff Dernavich 
strides over a hurdle on his way to 
the finish line. 

Co-captain Ralph Cirillo shows us 
his patented discus form. Ralph 
holds the school record in discus, 
and he won two Western Massa- 
chusetts individual titles in both 
discus and shot put. 




BOYS' TRACK 



■■ ran «i 



With only one bad day, they showed they were 

CHAMPIONS 



In dual meets, the 1988 
Boys' Track Team was 
remarkable, going un- 
beaten in ten tries. Often 
times, the team would go 
into these meets as clear 
underdogs. But, through 
careful strategy and plan- 
ning, and as a result of a 
series of clutch perfor- 
mances, these guys 
emerged victorious against 
such powerhouses as 
Agawam, Cathedral, Ho- 
lyoke, and Chicopee Com- 
prehensive. West Spring- 
field was beaten for the first 
time in many years. The 
squad went into the West- 
ern Massachusetts Cham- 
pionships with high hopes 
and with confidence. 

Maybe they had too 
much confidence. Maybe it 
was just a bad day. Maybe 
the team was simply out- 
manned. The champion- 
ships went very badly for 
the Falcons. They finished 
a disappointing seventh as 
one bad incident after an- 
other plagued the team. 
Hopes of back to back West- 



ern Mass Championships 
were dashed. 

But, this team had a lot to 
be proud of. As Valley 
League Champions, they 
had won some meets as 
thrilling as any in which 
Minnechaug has been in- 
volved. Behind the leader- 
ship of such outstanding 
seniors as Ralph Cirillo, 
Chris Smith, and Paul Fitz- 
gerald, the team silenced 
doubters and overcame ad- 
versity. Each of these guys 
has made significant contri- 
butions to a successful pro- 
gram for four years; their 
positions will never be com- 
pletely filled. 

Fortunately, this was 
largely a team of juniors 
and underclassmen. The fu- 
ture appears to be very 
bright, with some of the 
team's op point scorers re- 
turning for the 1989 cam- 
paign. Hopefully, they will 
have learned something 
from the bitter defeat at 
Western Mass, and will not 
make the same mistakes 
again. 




Following a successful baton ex- 
change with Scott Parker, Chris 
Baer sprints down the track. 

Rob Cummings clears the high 
jump bar with ease. 





BOYS' TRACK TEAM. Front Row: Paul Fitzgerald; Ken Sirois.Greg Geldart; Ron Jordan; istvan Ats; 
Chris Smith; Ralph Cirillo; Rob Williams; Scott Parker; Tony Morace; Jim Mandolini; Bernd Ehle; Jamie 
Fredericks; Bill Baughan; Sean Moriarty. Second Row: Eric Ellison; Jason Bruno; Steve Fiedler; Mike 
Pietryka; Mike Tarantino; JeffO'Shaughnessy; Chester Greene; Rod Campbell; Jeff Dernavich; Conrad 
Heede; Mark Sheehan; Dennis Burke; Wilfl Thompson; Jorge Garcia; Kevin Trombly; Mark Isham; Kathy 
Sullivan; Jen David. Back Row: Coach Gary Hamel; Coach David Bennett; Ted Furst; Jason Bergeron; 
Rylan Grant; Artis Falls; Sean Campbell; PJ Lussier; Jeremy Draper; John Belcastro; Rob Cummings; 
Randy Myers; Ben Connell; Jim DeForest; Noel Smith; Chris Baer; Scott Mellen; Will Squeglia; Dan 
Ashton; Coach Don Jacek. 



TRACK 
RESULTS 



TEAM 


WE 


THEY 


Northampton 


86 


50 


Chicopee 


79 


66 


Comp 






Holvoke 


99.5 


45.5 


Longmeadow 


89 


56 


Cathedral 


10 


70 


Agawam 


80 


65 


Westfield 


91 


44 


Central 


99 


46 


Chicopee 


109 


26 


West 


97 


48 


Springfield 







BOYS TRACK 







Rob Hanson cradles the ball and 
looks to make a pass. 



LACROSSE RESULTS 



VARSITY 



TEAM 


WE 


THEY 


Longmeadow 
Amherst 


2 

2 


30 
12 


Northampton 
Westfield 


7 
6 


13 

9 


Wilbraham Monson Academy 
Amherst 


7 


18 
12 


Westfield 


7 


14 


Northampton 
Somers 


2 
8 


12 


Windsor 


4 


6 


Somers 


5 


6 


South Hadley 
Longmeadow 
Deerfield 


7 
1 


2 

26 
Win 



JUNIOR VARSITY 



TEAM 

Westfield 

Northampton 

Amherst 

Westfield 

Deerfield 

Wilbraham Monson Acad 

Northampton 

Longmeadow 



WE 
Win 
Win 
Win 
Loss 
Win 
Win 
Loss 





LACROSSE TEAM. Front Row: 
Brendan Daly; Rob Dionne; Clay 
Holdsworth; Jason Bachelder; 
Scott Crimmiins; Wes Gwatkin; 
Larry Shea; Todd Pedace; Andy 
Hersman. Se.ond Row: Dave Gar- 
abedian; Matt Smith; Dave Kozub; 
Mark Dowd; Bill Crocker; Brian 
Fitzgerald; Jason Robinson; Dave 
Manning; Chad Meisner; Scott 
Kertenis; Bryce Whiting. Back 
Row: JV Coach Kevin McCullough; 
Assistant Coach Bill Woods; Rob 
Hanson; Mark Neff; Rich Chase; 
Matt Stachelek; Peter Brayton; 
Frank Flynn; Jeff Robinson; Chad 
Brown; Dave Gibb; John Tierney; 
John Farrell; Greg O'Connor; Var- 
sity Coach Russ Mooney. 







Lax team shows steady 




IMPROVEMENT 



Minnechaug La- 
crosse got off to a 
slow start with 
their 1988 season. The first 
game of the season was 
sure to be the toughest 
when the Laxmen had to 
face Longmeadow. The 
Lancers, being the team 
dominating the Lacrosse 
field for close to twenty 
years, managed to knock 
off the young team with lit- 
tle effort. 

Since then the team has 
gone up against Amherst, 
Northampton and West- 
field, each time facing de- 
feat. The losses were upset- 
ting, but the scores were 
not too bad, considering 
the absences and injuries 
plaguing the team. 

The Falcons suffered a 
hard loss to Westfield. The 



score went back and forth 
during a hard-hitting game. 
Senior goalie, Brian Fitzger- 
ald, had a great day in the 
net stopping shots. Co-cap- 
tain, Jason Bachelder also 
had a great game with two 
goals and several assists. 
Co-captain Wes Qwatkin, 
had an excellent game 
playing for the first time this 
season because of an in- 
jury. Seniors Todd Pedace, 
Rob Hanson and Dave Man- 
ning did well on the offense 
for the Falcons. Others con- 
tributing to the offense were 
Bryce Whiting, Larry Shea 
and Brett Knowles. Brendan 
Daly and Greg O'Connor 
helped the squad. 

Defensively, co-captain 
Scott Crimmins along with 
Dave Gibb and Chad Brown 
had excellent games and 



worked together to keep 
the score down. Seniors 
Mark Neffand Jeff Robinson 
contributed to the defense 
as defensive midfielders 
and both had great games. 

On the side lines, there 
are a couple of new faces, 
with head coach Russ Moo- 
ney leading the Falcons for 
his first year. Kevin McCul- 
lough is back for another 
season as head coach of 
the Junior Varsity,- and 
helping Coach Mooney this 
year is Springfield College 
graduate, Bill Woods. 

Although the Falcons' be- 
ginning has been rough, it's 
sure to smooth out as the 
team comes together. They 
look forward to a winning 
season. — Scott Crimmins 



x X 







Junior Varsity Coach Kevin McCul- 
lough and Varsity Coach Russ 
Mooney plan strategies. 



Jason Bachelder stretches out in 
his preparation for an upcoming 
game. 



Wes Gwatkin brings his stick back 
before making a pass. 




PAR-FECT 



Under the command of 
head coach Dave Barry, 
the varsity golf team en- 
joyed a successful season. Lead- 
ing the way was senior Jim Ku- 
binski, whose excellent play 
qualified him for the state indi- 
vidual tournament. Jim's unde- 
feated record was inspirational to 
the team as fellow seniors Rich 
Jordan and the long hitting Cory 
Collette played well all year long. 
The newcomer to the team, Todd 
Graham was always sharply 
dressed and played well when 
needed. 

The juniors on the team, Eric 
McGranahan, Todd Matthews, 
Rick Smith, and Craig Makuch all 



played their hearts out for Mr. 
Barry. It all payed off as the 
squad qualified for the Western 
Mass Team Championships, and 
finished respectively. Kubinski's 
leadership and concentration on 
the course was an excellent ex- 
ample for the rest of the team 
and was an integral part of the 
winning record. 

It was a great season and the 
team was successful in attaining 
its yearlong goal of making it to 
the Western Mass Champion- 
ships. Now the Minnechaug Golf 
Squad can only aim higher, and 
with Mr. Barry at the helm, any- 
thing is possible. 





Eric McGranahan, Rick Smith, Rich Jordan, Jim Kubinski, Coach Dave 
Barry, Cory Collette, Todd Graham, and Todd Matthews. 




GOLF SCORECARD 


TEAM 


WE 


THEY 


Holyoke 


17 


1 


Westfield 


8 


10 


East Longmeadow 


11 


7 


Agawam 


6 


12 


Ludlow 


18 





Longmeadow 


7 


11 


South Hadley 


13 


5 


East Longmeadow 


7 


11 


Agawam 


7.5 


10.5 


Ludlow 


9 


9 


Longmeadow 


14 


4 


South Hadley 


16 


4 



VARSITY GOLF 





MEMBERS OF THE SYNCHO 
TEAM. front Row: Shari Gaudette; 
Karen Rose; Suzanne Singiser; 
Tracy Garceau. Back Row: Nicole 
Brady; Tara Wholley; Beth Gillen; 
Shannon Martin; Tara Reavey ; 
Erica Kostka; Lynn Maloney; Lori 
Gil; Katie Racska; Amy Giantris; 
Eileen Blomberg and Amber 
Quist. 

Eileen Blomberg, Lynn Maloney. 
and Kelli Thomas walk out to form 
the last row of a box on stage as 
they perform "Pomp and Circum- 
stance." 

Eileen Blomberg forms a link in 
the stroking routine. 




IN SYNCH 

with each 
other 

SPORTS?" How are we supposed to come up with routines that have a sports 
theme? Several such comments reflecting this state of confusion were often 
uttered amongst the members of the 1988 Syncho Team during the first few- 
weeks of practice. Nevertheless, the team's determination to succeed was undoubta- 
bly proven on May 13 and 14, when the entire team pulled together to put on a show- 
that was well worth all the hard work and practice. 

Seniors Karen Rose, Suzanne Singiser, Shari Gaudette and Tracy Garceau contri- 
buted a great deal to the show. Several conflicts arose during the season, but these 
seniors made special efforts to work out all the kinks. Juggling around their jobs, 
ordering team sweatshirts for the first time, choreographing several different rou- 
tines, and finding a bathing suit that everyone could agree upon were only some of 
the challenges that we had to face. 

The underclassmen were also a special group of people. Their teamwork proved to 
be an asset to the show, while their appreciation for each other allowed them to 
perform certain stunts that otherwise would not have been done so successfully. 



Shannon Martin, Eileen Blomberg, and Suzanne Singiser 
perform the salute to seniors, "Pomp and Circumstance." 



SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMING 



& 




imM 




JUST 
SHORT 




BOYS' TENNIS. Front Row: Matt Nelson: Jeff Bennett; Rob Estrada; Bill 
Scarlett. Back Row: Coach Charles Martel; Peter Spellios; Doug Went- 
worth; John Nelson; Neil flynn. 



The Boys' Tennis Team 
smashed through another 
exciting season this past 
year. Just falling short of a win- 
ning record, the team continued 
to show a tremendous amount of 
spirit out on the courts, in addi- 
tion to having outstanding indi- 
vidual talent. The tennis squad 
was headed by seniors Neil Flynn 
and John Nelson, with a fleet of 
juniors behind them. The team 
enjoyed its second year of leader- 
ship and direction by Coach 
Charles Martell, a student at 
Springfield College. Martell said, 



"Ever since I gave up my position 
on the Springfield College tennis 
team and decided to coach, I 
haven't been sorry for one min- 
ute about my decision. I see a lot 
of talent in these guys, and I'm 
looking forward to a blowout sea- 
son next year." 

The team is indeed expecting 
to have a phenomenal season 
next spring with returning letter- 
men Jeff Bennett, Bill Scarlett; 
Todd Dickinson; Peter Spellios; 
Doug Wentworth; Jim Wilk; Matt 
Nelson; and Rob Estrada. 



GIRLS' TENNIS SCORES 


BOYS' TENNIS SCORES 


TEAM 


WE THEY 


WE 


THEY 


Ludlow 


4 1 


Chicopee 5 





Agawara 


4 1 


Holyoke 


5 


West Springfield 


3 2 


East Longmeadow 1 


4 


Holyoke 


4 1 


West Springfield 4 


1 


Chicopee 


4 1 


Chicopee Comp 


5 


Chieopee Comp 


1 4 


Ludlow 2 


3 


Palmer 


4 1 


Agawam 3 


2 


East Longmeadow 


4 1 


Westfield 2 


3 


West Springfield 


3 2 


Chicopee 5 





Agawam 


5 


East Longmeadow 1 


4 


Holyoke 


4 1 


Holyoke 


5 


East Longmeadow 


5 


Westfield 2 


4 


Chicopee 


5 


Agawam 5 






Jeff Bennett adroitly serves the Neil Flynn hits a back hand Becky McFeeters eryoys a rally 

ball while hitting a backhand. 





$ 



BOYS AMD GIRLS TENNIS 



Bill Scarlett stretches to return the 
ball. 



RLS' Tennis: Diana Pabich; Jen Riek; Marianne Marchesseault; Jen 
•arden; Nancy Orquiloa; Kim Roberts. Back Row: Coach Gladys 
: ande; Sara Jenkins; Jennifer Sanders; Mary LaPierre; Becky 
;Feeters; Wendy Bennett; and Julie Niederfringer. 




fT' fc 



fc" 




GOOD AND 

YOUNG 

The girls' varsity 
tennis team had an- 
other victorious 
season, with a final record 
of 12-2. Their only losses 
were to last year's Western 
Mass winner, Chicopee 
Comp. The team was led by 
coach Gladys Grande, who 
brought much experience 
and enthusiasm to the 
girls. This year's team was 
very young; consisting of 
only juniors and sopho- 
mores, meaning everyone 
return next year to 
continue in the same exel- 
lent style. 

Returning lettermen 
were captains Jennifer 
Dearden and Marianne 
Marchesseault. Also, Mary 
LaPierre, Diana Pabich, 
and Nancy Orquiola who 
contributed superior sin- 
gles' skills. Newcomers 
who added great strength 
and many important points 
were juniors Wendy Ben- 
nett, Becky McFeeters. and 
Jennifer Riek, and sopho- 
mores Sara Jenkins and Ju- 
lie Niederfringer. Four of 
these outstanding players 
qualified for the indivi- 
duals Western Mass Tour- 
nament at Smith College. 




Peter Spellios concentrates as he 
prepares to swing. 



BOYS' AND GIRLS' TENNIS 



$ 



THE common denominator of boys' and girls' cross country is their 

SPIRIT, NEW BLOOD 
AND ZEST 



w 




Sophomore Trances Truitt looks 
toward the finish line. 



ith a record of 5-6, the 
girls' cross country 
team had a successful 
season. The team, consisting of 
seniors Mary Beth Jacobs, Jackie 
Bushway, captain Becky Emerle 
Kirsten Root, and manager Kar 
ianne Kraus; junior Lisa Man 
ning; sophomores Frances Truitt 
Jill Turcotte, Melissa Luttrell 
Heather Brown, and Amanda 
Howell; and freshmen Amy Ross, 
and Mara Gaudette, placed sev 
enth out of eleven teams in the 
Western Mass. Division I Cham- 
Lisa Manning and 



Mara Gaudette placed in the top 
ten of their classes in the 
Coaches' Individuals Meet the 
week before. 

One of the most memorable 
meets of the season was the one 
held at Agawam. Due to the 
"great" explanation of the course 
by Mr. Barrett, half of our team 
took the wrong path. We ended 
up crawling over or under three 
fallen trees which were blocking 
the path. 

The boys' team also showed 
great spirit, with each individual 
member giving his best to defeat 



the competition, but their valient 
attempts were in vain. They end 
ed the season with a record of 1 
12. 

Prominent team leaders were 
returning seniors Conrad Heede, 
Mark Sheehan, and Dennis Burke 
who helped in supporting not 
only Coach Barrett, but in enn 
couraging the new team mem- 
bers: Bill Scarlett, Ben Connell, 
Frank Gerhart, Shawn Gralinski, 
John Noble, Aaron Polarcik, and 
Rob Pridemore. The team was 
able to have an enjoyable season 
in spite of their losses. 




Aaron Pilarcik, Frank Gerhart, 
Robert Pridemore, and Shawn 
Gralinski keep up the pace. 



Conrad Heede strides it out until 
the end. 



CROSS COUNTRY 




*jtw- 







GIRLS' RESULTS 


BOS' RESULTS 




1 TEAM 




Agawara 


won 


TEAM 


Central 
1 Westfield 
I Chicopee 


lost 
lost 


Cathedral lost 
Agawam won 
East 


Comp 

1 Northampton 


lost 
lost 


Longmeadow lost 
Westfield won 


Amherst 
, Cathedral 

I East 

Longmeadow 
Chicopee 
i West 

Springfield 


lost 
lost 


Northampton lost 
Longmeadow won 


lost 
lost 


Amherst lost 
East Longmeadow lost 
West Springfield won 


lost 


Longmeadow won 
Belchertown lost 


Longmeadow 


lost 




Belchertown 


lost 







BOYS CROSS COUNTRY TEAM. 
Front Row: Dennis Burke, Mark 
Sheehan, Conrad Heede. Bill 
Scarlett. Back Row: Rob Pride- 
more, Shawn Gralinski, Ben Con- 
nell, and Coach Marty Barrett. 



GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY TEAM. 
Front Row: Anju Reejsinghani and 
Becky Emerle. Middle Row: 
Heather Brown, Jackie Bushway. 
Karianne Rraus, Kirsten Root. 
Lisa Manning. Back' Row : Frances 
Truitt, Melissa Luttrell, Amanda 
Howell, Mara Gaudette, Jill Tur- 
cotte, and Coach Hal Miller. 



CROSS COUNTRY 



$ 





— ■ 


VARSITY FIELD HOCKEY 






1 TEAM 




| East Longmeadow 


won 


Smith Academy 


lost 


Agawam 


lost 


1 Westfield 


won 


West Springfield 


won 


1 Southwick 


tied 


1 Longmeadow 


lost 


I East Longmeadow 


tied 


'A Turners Falls 


won 


1 Agawam 


lost I 


1 Westfield 


won 


1 Westside 


won | 


I Southwick 


tied 


I Longmeadow 


lost 


JUNIOR VARSITY 


I TEAM 


Ml 


1 East Longmeadow 


won 


I Smith Academy 


lost 


1 Agawam 


won | 


1 West Springfield 


won 


| Southwick 


tie 


1 Longmeadow 


lost 


I East Longmeadow 


won 


1 Agawam 


won 


1 West Springfield 


won 


1 Southwick 


tied I 


1 Longmeadow 


won 1 










lifl 


y 



n 



m 






HIT 








Erica Dutil looks to the sidelines 
before she hits the ball. 



FIELD HOCKEY 



Amy Greene watches the 0-0 varsi- 
ty game against Southwick on 
September 28th with anticipation. 

Donna McGrath prepares instantly 
for the opponent during the tie JV 
game against Southwick. 



JV HELD HOCKEY TEAM, front 
Row: Jana Trombley, Juliet 
Greene, Rachel Morton, Cathy 
Gagnon, Sue Fierce. Middle row: 
Stephanie Pietryka, Erica Dutil, 
Jen Lynch, Betsy Leritz, Ellen Sul- 



livan, Heather Colclough. Back 
Row: managers Kellie Raczka and 
Cindy Brescia, Tania Fernandez, 
Donna McGrath, Amy Giantris, 
Laurie Delisle, Stephanie Roj, 
Becky Orr, Coach Sue Fetzold. 




# 






3* , 

i 

k^W &^ ' i ft , 








VARSITY FIELD HOCKEY, rront anne Marchesseault, Danielle Har- 
row: Amy Greene, Katie Dennis, ris. Back row: Coach Sharon 
Becky McFeeters, Kirsten Vinson. Flagg, Jodi Garceau, Candy Ars- 
Middle row: Sheila Moriarty, Erica lanian, Jen Jose, Sue Fiedler, 
Kanzinger, Kim Boucher, Mari- Diana Pabich, Brigitte Felouze. 



A team with tournament 

HOPES 



Luckily for the girls' field 
hockey team, some things 
do change. After seven 
straight losing seasons, the team 
pulled things together this year, 
posting a final record of 6-5-3. 
Why the sudden success? Coach 
Sharon Flagg certainly is a rea- 
son, with her great attitude, dedi- 
cation, and conditioning , and 
continual teamwork. With eight 
returns and seven new varsity 
players, the team was well bal- 
anced. The seven seniors — Kim 
Boucher, Katie Dennis, Amy 
Greene, Erica Kanzinger, Mari- 
anne Marchesseault, Becky 
McFeeters, and Kirsten Vinson — 
added experience while the un- 
derclassmen added enthusiasm. 
We couldn't have survived with- 
out them. Onto the players. The 
only word to describe the goal- 
tending of the most valuable 
team member, Jodi Garceau, is 

Jen Jose shows her aggressive- 
ness as she stops the opponent 
from getting to the ball. 



awesome. She was tough, consis- 
tent and gave the rest of the 
team confidence. With her great 
communication skills, Sheila 
("call me Moe") Moriarty took 
control of the field. Co-captain 
Katie Dennis knew just how to 
intimidate the other team (hit 
'em with your stick). Offense was 
led by Amy Greene, Erica Kan- 
zinger, and co-captain Becky 
McFeeters, who always knew 
when to cross the net to set up a 
goal. Linking the offense and de- 
fense were Danielle Harris, Diana 
Pabich, and Kirsten Vinson . 

Thanks to Coach Flagg, Coach 
Sue Petzold (J.V.) and all of the 
parents and fans who supported 
the team this year (especially the 
boys' varsity soccer team)! Next 
year, look for those Falcon wom- 
en at tournament time on the 
Smith College turf. They'll be 
there. 

Bridgitte Felouze shows her spirit 
as she helps tape the foot of her 
fellow teammate, Katie Dennis. 




FIELD HOCKEY 



Debbie Tupek charges her oppo 




Amy Barber, Jessica Winn, 
and Mandy Kober charge 
past their opposition during 
an important home game 
played against Westfield. 



GIRL'S VARSITY SOCCER TEAM. 

Front row: Kateri Collins, Kelli 
Thomas, Debbie Tukpek, Gianna 
Pedace. Middle row: Debbie 
Courtney, Marq Mosier, Brandy 
Renn, Amy Barber, Jessica Winn, 
Mandy Kober, Michele Kennedy. 
Back row: Coach Jay Deely, 
Christy Lefort, Becky Crocker, 
Alexis Heede, Marianne Manseau, 
Katie Burke, Kim Roberts, Becky 
Mclsaac. 

GIRLS SOCCER 



GIRLS' VARSITY 


TEAM 




Agawam 


lost 


East 




Longmeadow 


lost 


Northampton 


won 


Holyoke 


lost 


Cathedral 


lost 


Westfield 


lost 


Chicopee Comp. 


won 


Ludlow 


lost 


Central 


lost 


Chicopee 


lost 


Agawam 


lost 


East 




Longmeadow 


lost 


West 




Springfield 


lost 


Holyoke 


tied 


West 




Springfield 


lost 


JUNIOR VARSITY 


TEAM 




Agawam 


won 


East 




Longmeadow 


lost 


West 




Springfield 


lost 


Northampton 


won 


Cathedral 


lost 


Westfield 


lost 


Central 


tied 


Chicopee Comp 


won 


Ludlow 


tied 


Chicopee 


won 


Agawam 


tied 


East Longmeadow 


won 


West Springfield 


lost 


■■■HHMHH 



Their desire and friendship helped them to 

ALWAYS HAV 
FUN 



The season was like no oth- 
er. Gianna Pedace, one of 
our four captains, had 
struck what we thought was a 
sure loss bet with Rob Williams, 
the captain of the boys' soccer 
team, on who would have a better 
season record — the boys or the 
girls. 

We walked into our first 
games and lost big against 
Agawam. But our spirits were 
high and we started turning our 
luck. The terrific skills of Becky 
Mclsaac gave us hope and saved 
our skins. In the first Agawam 
game, she saved 57 shots on goal, 
and only let 12 pass. The next 
time we met, she and the fulls 
held them to 3. The quick attacks 



and strong kicks of fullbacks 
Gianna Pedace, Debbie Tupek, 
Marq Mosier, Brandy Renn, and 
Jenn Lavoie gave those enemy 
forwards a scare. Moving right 
along the field, the halfbacks 
were as tough as a lean roast on 
broil for 10 hours (now that's 
tough!). Once Marianne Manseau 
got her braces off, she was a de- 
mon to reckon with. Debbie 
Courtney held the center while 
Michele Kennedy, Becky Crocker, 
Amy Barber and Kim Roberts 
dominated the sidelines. 

Coach Deeley's common pep 
talks usually included, "Hey kids, 
use your heads out there!" Well, 
Katerie Collins, with her speedy 
Tasmanian Devil attacks, and Ka- 



tie Burke with her superb crosses 
and shots, showed the team that 
we could do it, but Kelli Thomas 
took it too much to heart, and 
really gave us a scare when she 
took out a West Springfield play- 
er with her face. Christy Lefort 
and Mandy Kober, our little pack- 
ages with a lot of skill, played the 
center. The season ended loudly, 
with a new type of kickoff. a 
kickoff to say goodbye to Minne- 
chaug from all of the senior play- 
ers, a candy and cider kickoff in 
the rain with our biggest fan. Ed- 
die. We had to say goodbye to our 
mascott Bux Brown, but like Bux. 
our spirit will never die. 





Karen Granaudo helps out. 



JV SOCCER TEAM. Front Row: 
Sue Withington. Kerry Manning 
Becky Triggs, Anne Berte. Middle 
Row: Pam Chase, Sarah Hsiao. 
Charity Manegre, Melissa Burk, 
Kandy Belcher, Alexis Loper. Peg- 
gy Dearden. Back Row: Amanda 
Zepke. Kathy Bresette. Amy 
Liese, Karen Granaudo. Kealy 
O Brien, Heather Wages, Heather 
Wholley, Jen Samble, and Coach 
Dan Balser 



GIRLS SOCCER 







Will Thompson boots the ball up- 
field. 



BOYS' VARSITY SOCCER 



TEAM 

Central 

Chicopee 

Cathedral 

Longmeadow 

Agawam 

Northampton 

Holyoke 

Westfield 

Holyoke 

West Springfield 

Chicopee Comprehensive 

Ludlow 

East Longmeadow 

Chicopee 

Amherst 

Longmeadow 




VARSITY SOCCER. Front row: Dave Garibeian, Kevin Trom- 
bly, Rob Williams, Steve Fiedler, Tom Moore. Middle row: 
Eric Keeler, Jeff O'Shaughnessy, John Schafer, Rico Ro- 
meo, Mark Haggerty, Mike Tarantino. Back row: Mark Sy- 
manski, Chris Morissette, Will Thompson, Dave Gibb, Todd 
Jason Bergeron, and Coach Art Tipaldi. 







BOYS' SOCCER 



Hard Times 



The 1988 Varsity Boys' Soc- 
cer Team proved to be a 
major disappointment. 
High early-season hopes were de- 
stroyed as the team was unable 
to put the ball into the goal. One 
heart-breaking loss followed an- 
other. Bad luck played as big a 
part as anything else. Open nets 
were missed and players' shots 
hit the post on numerous frus- 
trating occasions. 

The team really had nothing to 
be ashamed of. The teams in 
Western Mass. were outstanding 
and the Falcons were in virtually 
all of their contests. Had the ball 
bounced differently early on, 
then the results might have been 



different. Head coach Art Tipaldi 
was proud of the team, the mem- 
bers should have been proud of 
themselves as well. 

There were a few bright spots 
to the season. Rob Williams com- 
pleted a brilliant career by being 
named for the second consecutive 
time to the All Western Massa- 
chusetts Team. Will Thompson, 
who played exceptionally well at 
fullback, and Chris Morissette, 
who was a solid halfback 
throughout the season, were both 
named to the All-League squad. 
Unfortunately, and for whatever 
the reasons may have been, it 
was not meant to be for the Fal- 
cons this vear. 





Rob Williams heads the ball up- 
field. 



Kevin Trombly outruns the other 
team. 




Greg Lefebvre goes for the steal 
while Chris Morissette and Kevin 
Trombly help out. 



;:t 



Vi--_*w* 



BOYS SOCCER 



& 




J.V. SOCCER TEAM. Front row: Jack Welch, Rob Labradorf, Jason Wal- 
bridge. Noel Smith, Greg O'Connor, Larry Shay. Middle row: Roger 
Brunelle, Jim Troy, Steve Chicette, Teri Tousignent, Doug Rose, Adam 
Field, Brendan Halloran. Back row: Clay Holdsworth, Rylan Grant, Eric 
Belliveau, Kevin Berger, James Anderson, Dave Belcher, Coach Jen- 



FREHMAN SOCCER. Front row: Ryan Trombly, Craig Soukup, Mike 
McCurry, Bob O'Neil, Dean Rosenthal, Craig Stitsinger. Middle Row: 
Mike Mascaro, Bill Veideman, Jon Kibbe, Jason Adamson, Ed Harris, 
Bill Dean, Charlie Farrah. Back Row: Goalie Anthony Desjardins, Doug 
Bower, Jason Thomas, Todd Burger, Chris Lynch, Bill Szafarowicz, Mark 
DeGray, and Coach Peter Folvi. 



$ 



J.V./FRESHMAN SOCCER 




freshman Jason Thomas dribbles past the opposition 



Jason Walbridge dives to save 
shot. 



V 



JUNIOR VARSITY- 



TEAM 

Central 

Chicopee 

Cathedral 

Longmeadow 

Agawam 

Northampton 

Westfield 



won 
lost 
won 
tied 
won 
won 
lost 
lost 






Holyoke 

West Springfield 

Chicopee Comp. 

Ludlow 

East Longmeadow lost 

Chicopee lost 

Amherst tied 

Longmeadow 




■■■■■i 


FRESHMEN- 


TEAM 




East 




Longmeadow 


Lost 


Longmeadow 


Lost 


Agawam 


Lost 


Cathedral 


Lost 


West 




Springfield 


Lost 


Ludlow 


Lost 


East 




Longmeadow 


Lost 


West 




Springfield 


Lost 


Longmeadow 


Lost 


■■■■■■ 



Freshman Ryan Trombly boots 
the ball downfield. 



J.V./FRESHMAN SOCCER 



& 



GYMNASTICS 



Courtney Ware poses on the Amy Smith shows her winning 




front row: Amy Smith, Cheri 
Mettle. Middle row: Amy Jen- 
kinson, Kara Welch, Lori Rich- 
ter. Amy Davidson. Back row: 
Mary Veideman, Courtney 
Ware, Tara Daly, Becky Bea- 
com, Bonnie Hanson, Nancy 
Bigos, Kim Ingram. 



GYMNASTICS 



A year of survival turned into a 



CHAMPIONSHIP YEAR 



At the beginning of the 
season the future of the 
gymnastics team looked 
dismal. The minimum require- 
ment of the gymnasts wasn't met 
due to lack of interest; so the 
team faced termination. The only 
four returning members were 
Kara Welch, Cheri Methe, Tara 
Daly, and Courtney Ware, and 
there appeared to be no new pros- 
pects. Gradually more members 
joined until finally a constant 
eleven gymnasts was reached. 

Some new members of the 
team this year were Becky Bea- 
com, Nancy Bigos, Bonnie Han- 
son, Lori Richter, Amy Jenkinson, 
Amy Davidson, and Amy Smith. 
Becky and Nancy excelled at 
floor and beam respectively and 
were placed in the first line up. 



Lori, a strong vaulter and excel- 
lent floor contender, helped in 
winning the championships. 
Courtney was also a big asset, for 
she did every event and was al- 
ways there if they needed her. 
Likewise, Bonnie, Amy Jenkin- 
son, and Tara competed in two or 
three events a meet, and were a 
great help to the team. Kara, 
Amy Davidson, Cheri Methe and 
Amy Smith competed in the all- 
around every meet and greatly 
helped in bringing the team to 
the championships. 

Due to injuries at the begin- 
ning of the season, the team un- 
fortunately lost a few meets and 
compiled a record of 11-3-0. The 
season, overall, went well. The 
team entered the Amherst com- 
petition for the second meet of 



the season to be beaten by only 
10 points. The second time they 
challenged the Hurricanes, they 
were beaten by a mere .45 of a 
point. They wanted to beat them 
at Western Massachusetts so bad- 
ly, that "they could actually taste 
it." Wanting to beat the undefeat- 
ed Amherst, they went to prac- 
tice everyday and worked as hard 
as possible, with Coach McDiar- 
mid pushing and leading them all 
of the way. Nothing was going to 
stop them from winning. They en- 
tered the Western Mass Competi- 
tion with a postitive and excited 
attitude, which in turn helped 
them to regain, after a two year 
gap, the Western Mass Cham- 
pionship title. The gymnasts 
closed out their season with their 
18th Western Mass title. 




Bonnie Hanson gracefully finishes 
a routine. 




Cheri Methe performs exceptional 
turn during her floor routine. 



Amy Davidson performs on the 
beam. 



GYMNASTICS 







A MEMORABLE YEAR 



The season-ending gun 
sounded. The last play 
was over. The final Fal- 
con victory was in the record 
book. The 1988 Minnechaug foot- 
ball team had just completed a 
very successful and exciting sea- 
son-finishing with a winning 7-3 
record. Most importantly, the 
Minnechaug seniors had played 
their last game together. The Fal- 
cons' future was now entrusted to 
and placed in the hands of the 
underclassmen, especially Bryce 
Whiting and Oliver Asmar who 
will co-captain the 1989 Minne- 
chaug team. 

Four years ago, no one could 
have predicted that the last time 
they would play together would 
result in one of the most exciting 
and memorable games of their 
careers. The last game was 
against the Hurricanes of Am- 
herst and was won by Minne- 
chaug 25-24. The Falcons mount- 
ed an early offensive blitz which 
vaulted them into a 17-0 lead 
principally due to Tom Mango's 
passing and Oliver Asmar's TD 
catch and a 25 yard field goal by 
Bryce Whiting. The Hurricanes 
scored a touchdown and a two 
point conversion just before time 



Mike Jarvis cuts through the line 



ran out at the end of the first 
half. 

The Falcons added eight points 
early in the third quarter when 
Jim Thompson scored his 23rd 
touchdown of the season on a 78 
yard punt return. Following that 
score, quarterback Tom Mango 
hit Nate Scott with a two point 
conversion pass increasing Min- 
nechaug's lead to 25-8. It looked 
like this game would be a very 
dull affair. 

At this point in the game, the 
momentum shifted to Amherst. 
They scored sixteen points in the 
second half and only trailed by 
one point. Late in the fourth 
quarter, the Hurricanes had the 
ball inside the Falcon ten yard 
line with a first down and time 
running out. It appeared that 
they would score and upset the 
Falcons. Each time Amherst at- 
tempted to score, the Falcon de- 
fense rose to the occasion and 
stopped them cold. Finally, on the 
fourth down with less than a 
yard to go, Amherst ran to the 
Falcon's right defensive side for 
what appeared to be a sure score. 
Out of nowhere came Jim Thomp- 
son along with a host of other 
Falcons to stop the Amherst ball 



carrier inched short of the goal 
line. That play sealed the victory 
for Minnechaug and was a sym- 
bol of how the entire team played 
all year — with determination 
and grit. 

Molded by Coach Cauley and 
led by the seniors, the Falcons 
matured into a strong and talent- 
ed football team. It is a team with 
strong and unshakeable bonds as 
illustrated by the following com- 
ments made by some of the sen- 
iors. 

When asked about his career 
at Minnechaug, Rich Chase said, 
"It was exciting being with guys 
like Jim, Mike, Tom, and the rest. 
If I could do it all over again, I 
would." Adding to this feeling 
was the deep appreciation for 
their coaches as expressed by 
Todd Matthews when he stated, 
"Their leadership and under- 
standing kept all of us interested 
even when we were at practice. 
Their spirit definitely rubbed off 
on all of us." 

When asked about the seniors 
and what they meant to the char- 
acter of the 1988 Falcons, Coach 
George Cauley could hardly dis- 
guise his enthusiam. He said, "I 
thought these guys were great. 



They were truly outstanding 
players and they set the stan- 
dards for teamwork and leader- 
ship for our team this year." 

A few of the Falcon team 
members made outstanding ac- 
complishments during the sea- 
son. The offense was led by Jim 
Thompson who tied for the first 
in the state for the number of 
touchdowns scored at 25. Tom 
Mango also did extremely well as 
he topped Western Mass. quarter- 
backs with the most passes and 
the highest number of yards com- 
pleted. Mango also led the league 
in TD passes. Guided by the sen- 
iors, it is clear that the Falcons 
were victorious — against all 
odds. 

At the football banquet, Darrin 
Bilik, Jeff Luttrell, and Rick 
Smith received the Coaches' 
Award. Mike Jarvis received the 
best defensive player award. 
Chris Kuselias received the most 
improved player award. Jim 
Thompson and Tom Mango each 
received the outstanding offen- 
sive player award. Tom Mango 
received the William Sullivan Jr. 
Award. 











VARSITY FOOTBALL TEAM. Front row: Rick Chase, Chris Meisner, Jim 
Thompson, Tom Mango, Mate Scott, Todd Matthews. 2nd row: Mark 
Dowd, Derek Moran, Jeff Luttrell, Mike Jarvis, Jason Sares, Rick Smith, 
Darrin Bilik, Artis Falls, Kevin Lashway. 3rd row: Frank Dolan, Chris 
Baer, Chad Meisner, Chris Kuseleis, Dave Kozub, Chris Anzalone, Will 



Squeglia. Oliver Asmar, Bryce Whiting, Brenden Daly, Mike Edery, 
Steve Schmuck, John Farrell. Back row: Coach Don Duff, Coach Gerald 
Martin, Randy Myers, Mark Isham, Frank Flynn, Scott Mellon, Brent 
McKinnon, Steve Meisner, Jim Sullivan, Coach George Cauley. 



VARSITY FOOTBALL 



Jason Sares and Scott Mellon 
tackle the ballcarrier. 



Jim Thompson shows us he's 
more than a great running 
back as he punts, throws, and 
returns a punt. 



& u. 




The Talcons take a break during a timeout to listen to the coaches. Bryce Whiting kicks off. 






TEAM 

Longmeadow won 

ML St. Joseph won 
East 

Longmeadow won 

Holyoke won 

Agawam won 

Cathedral lost 

Westfield lost 

Central won 

Chicopee Comp lost 

Amherst won 




J- ] j- »i 



VARSITY FOOTBALL 






■mr&\ 



1 1 4B 



i 




Freshman quarterback Alan For- Gio Cirillo rushes into the open 
emba looks for someone to pass area of the field, hoping to make a 
the ball to upfield. touchdown. 



/ 



./FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 



Elusive Ed D'Amato breaks away 
from his opponent. 



Brendan Cavanaugh aids in drag- Coach Russ Mooney watches the 
ging down the runner. action. 









FRESHMAN TEAM. Front row: Al Foremba, Chris Hebert, James Dubord, Bryan Christofori, Chris Lucarelle, 
John Mumper, Shawn Coyle, Todd Shumate. Middle row: Eric White, Jason Menard, Henry Wawrzonek, Eric 
Boduch, Ed D'Amato, Matt Scarlett, Jay Gagliarducci, Matt Glover, Paul DeVries. Back Row: Coach Russell 
Mooney, John Kennedy, Jeff Young, Eric Hall, Louis McCray, Gio Cirillo, Phil Palmer, Peter Rogers, Doug 
Albee, Brendan Cavanaugh, Joe Wilson, Coach Mark Mora. 



■■^■■^■H 


FRESHMAN 








^^^■■■H 


TEAM 




Longmeadow 


won 


East 




Longmeadow 


won 


Holyoke 


lost 


Agawam 


lost 


Cathedral 


lost 


Westfield 


lost 


Ludlow cancelled 


Chicopee 




Comp. 


lost 


Amherst 


lost 





J.V./FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 



$ 




JV CHEERLEADERS. Front row: 
Tara Wholley and Kathy Hoffman. 
Middle row: Kristen Falzone, Ma- 
rie Courtney, Kim Forrant, Beth 
Qillen, Nicole Bluteau. Back Row: 
Bridget Baron, Andrea David, Lori 
Estrada, Kara Ruscio, Sandy Don- 
nelly. 



CHEERLEADERS 




Amber Quist gets a boost from 
her teammates. 



The varsity squad performs during a game. 




SPIRIT 



It has been another 
great year for the MRUS 
cheerleaders. Prepara- 
tion for the year began in 
August when we attended 
the UCA camp at Amherst 
College and we quickly rec- 
ognized what a talented 
and dedicated squad we 
had. Support of the football 
and basketball teams were 
a priority with the girls pro- 
moting school spirit by 
decorating locker rooms 
and hallways. A new twist 
was added this year with 
the "secret cheerleader" - 
each girl giving secret gifts 
to their basketball player 
on game days. 

Much of our efforts in the 
second half of the year were 
devoted to preparing for 
competition. It was with 
real excitement that we wel- 
comed a national instructor 
who came on two different 
weekends to help choreo- 
graph our competition rou- 
tine. Practices were long 
and hard - but the excite- 
ment and dedication never 
wore off. This year we were 
led by capable and exper- 
ienced captain Allison Mul- 
lett who did an excellent 



VARSITY CHEERLEADERS: Front 
Row Nancy Orquiola, Amber 
Quist, Carolee Salerno. Middle 
Row Katie Raczka, Suzanne Mes- 
sier, Lori Gil, Nicole Brady. Back 
Row Coach Lois Mitchell, Stacy 
Wilson, Allison Mullett, Kim Diota- 
levi, Lisa Kennedy, Molly Rihm. 



job directing the team. Our 
only other senior was Kim 
Diotalevi who not only ad- 
ded experience but light- 
ened many moments with 
her humor. The majority of 
the squad was juniors rang- 
ing in abilities from gym- 
nastics to dancing, each 
adding a necessary skill to 
the team. Carolee Salerno, 
nancy Orquiola, Stacy Wil- 
son, Lisa Kennedy, and Su- 
zanne Messier all returned 
for the second year on var- 
sity. Juniors Katie Raczka, 
Lori Gil, Molly Rihm, and Ni- 
cole Brady joined us this 
year. Returning sophomore 
Amber Quist rounded out 
the talented group. The var- 
sity squad is coached by 
Lois Mitchell. 

This year saw a new ju- 
nior varsity coach, Diane 
Lyons, who came with 
much enthusiasm and 
some fresh ideas. The J.V. 
squad had an excellent 
year mixing some exper- 
ienced cheerleaders with 
some new talented fresh- 
man. All in all, it turned out 
to be an exciting year of 
cheerleading and we look 
forward to next year. 



CHEERLEADING 



$ 



"#•* 



They Keep Constantly 

WINNING 



Erica Kanzinger, Kelli Thomas and Chris Agnew pysche up the team. 



c 



apturing their fourth 
straight Division A 
crown and third con- 
secutive Western Mass 
Championships, the girls 
swim team was lead by Sen- 
iors Chris Agnew, Ann 
Counos, Erica Kanzinger, 
and Kelli Thomas. 

All four seniors have 
been strong members of 
the team for their four 
years. Chris holds three 
Western Mass records (200 
IM, 500 Free, and 100 
Breast) and has won seven 
individual titles. Ann has 
consistently placed in the 
top six in Western Mass in 
both the sprint and dis- 
tance freestyles. Erica has 
placed in freestyle, IM, and 
butterfly, and Kelli in the 
200 IM and 100 backstroke. 



Underclassmen contri- 
buting to this years Western 
Mass title were Juniors Jen 
Lavoie (100 Fly, 200 IM), 
Laura White (50 and 100 
Free), Sophomores Anne 
Berte (50 and 100 Free), Ju- 
liet Greene (100 and 200 
Free), and Freshman 
Heather Colclough (100 
Fly, 500 Free), Anita Sala- 
mone (100 Back, 200 IM). 

Divers Charity Manegre, 
Amy Sullivan, and swim- 
mers: Melissa Burk, Andrea 
Chechile, Becky Crocker, 
Amy Qiantris, Kara Perkins, 
Sheila O'Donnell, Kellie 
Raczka, Stephanie Roj, Jen 
Sanders, and Meredith 
Braskie gave needed depth 
to the talented girl's swim 
team. 




GIRLS SWIMMING 



Chris Agnew shows her champion- Diver Amy Sullivan soars through 
ship form. the air. 




GIRLS SWIMMING 



Amherst 


lost 


Cathedral 


won 


Longmeadow 


won 


Northampton 


won 


Central 


won 


Agawam 


won 


South Hadley 


won 


E. Longmeadow 


won 


Amherst 


won 


Cathedral 


won 


Longmeadow 


won 




. 3L im* m ! 



Front row: Jen Sanders, Jen Lavoie, Chris Agnew, Kelli Thomas, Ann Counos, Erica Kanzinger. Middle Row: 
Stephanie Roj, Sheila O'Donnell, Andrea Chechile, Amy Giantris, Kara Perkins, Laura White. Back row: 
manager Kim Ingram, manager Kelly Fincince, manager Penny Griswold, Kelli Raczka, Becky Crocker, 
Melissa Burke, Anita Salamone, Charity Manegre, Coach Linda Short, Coach Pat McDiarmid, Anne Berte, 
Juliet Greene, Amy Sullivan, Heather Colcough. 



GIRL'S SWIMMING 







Senior Jim Wilk gets loose before Senior Spanish exchange student 
his race. Mario Rodriguez swims strongly. 



Another team carries in the Falcon. 

FRADITION 



Lead by seniors Mark 
Szymanski and Jim 
Wilk, junior Keith 
McFarland, and Sopho- 
more Paul Mikuszewski, a 
the boys' swim team cap- 
tured Divison A honors and 
placed first in Western Mass 
this year. 

Mark Szymanski has 
been a top twelve finisher 
in the 100 butterfly for the 
past two years along with 
Jim Wilk, a standout in the 
sprint freestyles, who has 
placed in the top six in 
Western Mass the past 
three years, junior Keith 
McFarland (200 1M, 500 free 
and 100 breast) and sopho- 
more Paul Mikusweski (200 
and 500 freestyle) have 



BOYS SWIMMING 



Deerfield 


won 


Amherst 


won 


Cathedral 


won 


Longmeadow 


won 


Northampton 


won 


Central 


won 


Agawam 


won 


S. Hadley 


won 


E. Longmeadow 


won 


Amherst 


won 


Cathedral 


won 


Longmeadow 


lost 



consistently placed in the 
top six in Western Mass. 

Spanish exchange stu- 
dent Mario Rodriguez ad- 
ded needed depth to the 
boys team in butterfly and 
backstroke. Other Western 
Mass qualifiers include Rog- 
er Brunelle (200 and 500 
freestyle), Robbie Fortier 
(200 IM and 500 freestyle), 
and diver Mike Smith. 

Other team members 
contributing to the success 
of the boys team were: 
Todd Matthews, Phil King, 
John Farrell, Neil Whitfield, 
Jim DeForest, Alex Durzy, 
Sanjiv Reejhsinghani, Drew 
Foricer, Scott Topor, and 
diver Darrin White. 





Junior Darrin White prepares 
enter the water. 



Junior Keith McFarland beating the competition. 



BOYS SWIMMING 




Front row Mark Syzmanski, Jim Wilk, Mario Rodriguez, Todd Matthews. 
Middle row Paul Mikuszewski, Phil King, John Farrell, Jim DeForest 
Back row Alex Durzy, Sanjiv Reejsinghani, Scott Topor, Rob Fortier, 
Roger Brunelle, Neil Whitfield, Coach Linda Short, Coach Pat McDiar- 
mid. Drew Forcier, Keith McFarland, Darrin White, Mike Smith. 



Sophomore John Farrell swims the breastroke. 



BOYS SWIMMING 



Junior Kevin Miller boxes out the 
opposition. 




Seniors Mike Pietryka, Jeff 
Dernavich, and Mike Jarvis 
all go airbound for the easy 
hoop. 



Coaches Wayne Morse and Larry 
Treed watch the game. 



Senior Darrin Bilik hauls in an offensive rebound. 



BOYS VARSITY BASKETBALL 



THEY NEVER GAVE UP DURING A FRUSTRATING SEASON AND GOT A 

GREAT FIRST WIN 



We were halfway 
through our 
league schedule, 
having lost all five league 
games, and all eight inde- 
pendent games before that. 
We knew, however, that we 
were better than 0-13. If a 
few things had gone our 
way, the season would've 
been dramatically different. 
The previous four league 
games had been heart- 
throbbing losses: A loss to 
Westfield by 2 in 3 overtime, 
a loss to once beaten Long- 
meadow after trailing by 4 
with 2 minutes left, a 4 pt. 
loss to West Springfield, 
and another 3 overtime 
loss, this time to Agawam. 
The pain and frustration of 
these games was getting to 
us, and we knew we wanted 
Chicopee Comp. 

They had scored 32 pts 
off of us in the first quarter 
in the first meeting, having 
a field day from 3 pt range 



and every where else on the 
floor. This time we were at 
home, and we were ready. 
Steve Fiedler had returned 
for 2 games after recovering 
from his knee injury, and he 
got the starting nod when 
Mike Pietryka came up sick 
and unable to play. Steve 
was absent from our first 
game at Comp, and Kevin 
Miller had been coming on 
strong ever since, piling up 
the points and rebounds. 

This game started quite 
differently then the last. 
After 4 minutes, the score 
was only 2-2 due to tough 
defense on each end. This 
pace continued and we led 
7-6 after 1 period, Kevin 
Miller scoring all 7 of our 
points, he continued to 
score 11 of our 1st 17 pts, 
with Steve Fiedler adding 2 
3-pointers. Comp was con- 
tent to press and run the 
floor, but we kept the pace 
down and stayed away from 



turnovers, leading by one at 
halftime, 23-22. 

Comp came out with the 
first 6 before Kevin began to 
do some work. Another 
Comp flurry put us down by 
8. We recovered and at the 
end of 3, the score was 37- 
30, Comp up by four. 

The fourth quarter was 
much of the same, Comp's 
lead wavering between 4 
and 6 points. Mark Maggerty 
continued his consisted 
performance and Kevin 
Miller dominated the in- 
side. We trailed by 4 with 2 
minutes left and Comp 
turned the ball over several 
times while trying to stall. 
Our defense stayed tough, 
and a Miller turn-around 
and 2 Bruno hoops (one 
with 6 sec left) sent us to 
overtime at 46-46. 

Steve Fiedler fouled out 
quickly, leaving Maggerty, 
Dernavich, Bilik, Bruno, 
and Miller on the floor. We 



were carried in the 1st over- 
time by Jeff Dernavich who 
scored all 5 pts to put the 
game into a 2nd overtime at 
51-51. We held Comp 
scoreless in the last 50 sec 
to stay in the game. 

The 2nd overtime ended 
with a 57-57 tie, thanks to 
the inside work of Kevin 
Miller and Jason Bruno and 
our still tough defense after 
38 minutes of play. 

Finally, there was the 3rd 
overtime, and we were not 
to be denied. Jeff Dernavich 
and Kevin Miller combined 
for 7 pts in route to a 2 pt 
win, 64-62. A last ditch ef- 
fort by Comp fell short, and 
we had gotten our first win. 
It was not only the 1st win of 
the year, but also the first 
win in the new gym. The 
noise of the fans were deaf- 
ening, helping to push us in 
to victory. It was a game 
we'll never forget. 



BOYS VARSITY 



Chicopee 


loss 


Morthampton 


loss 


Cathedral 


loss 


Greenfield 


loss 


South Hadley 


loss 


Amherst 


loss 


Holyoke 


loss 


Putnam 


loss 


Chicopee 


loss 


Comp 




Westfield 


loss 


Longmeadow 


loss 


W. Springfield 


loss 


Agawam 


loss 


Chicopee 


win 


Comp 




Westfield 


win 


Longmeadow 


win 


W. Springfield 


win 


Agawam 


win 





front row Tom Mango, Darrin Bilik, Steve Fiedler. Middle row Chris 
Morissette, Mike Jarvis, Mate Scott, Kevin Miller. Back row Ty Hamer, 
Jason Bruno, Kevin Miller. Jeff Dernavich, Mike Fietryk.i. 



Senior Jeff Dernavich sticks the 
deep jumpshot. 



BOYS VARSITY BASKETBALL 







Sophomore Brian Oglesby brings 
the ball up the floor. 



Freshman Robert Pridemore pulls 
up for the jumpshot. 




f) *\^I 



A 34 ' 







, in 11 ' 




Front row Bryan Oglesby, Mark Haggerty, Chad Meisner. Middle row 
Jason Carr, Brian Bishop, Brian Qoodhind, Rob Kumming. Back Kevin 
Burger, Jamie Connell, Chad Brown. 



Front row Chris Hebert, Dean Rosenthal, Ryan Trombly. Middle row Jay 
Gagliarducci, Doug Albee, Robert Pridemore, Henry Wawrzonek, Eric 
Boduch, Bill Sazfarowicz. Back row Coach Russ Mooney, Eric White, 
Mark Kullis, Pete Rodgers, Jim Dubord, Charlie Farrah. 



$ 



BOYS' JV/FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 



Junior Chad Meisner takes the 
ball strong to the hoop. 




JUNIOR VARSITY 



FRESHMAN 



South Hadley 

Holyoke 

Cathedral 


won 
won 
loss 


West 




Springfield 
Westfield 


loss 
loss 


Central 


loss 


Agawam 
East 


won 


Longmeadow 
loss 


Longmeadow 
South Hadley 
Chicopee 
Amherst 


loss 
loss 
loss 
loss 


Northampton 
East 


loss 


Longmeadow won 
Longmeadow loss 
Chicopee Comp 
loss 


Morthampton 
Amherst 


loss 
won 


Agawam 


won 



Holyoke 


loss 


Longmeadow 


loss 


East 




Longmeadow 


loss 


Agawam 


loss 


Longmeadow 


loss 


Agawam 


loss 


Holyoke 


loss 


East 




Longmeadow 


loss 


Chicopee Comp 


loss 


Westfield 


loss 


Longmeadow 


loss 


West 




Springfield 


loss 


Agawam 


loss 


Chicopee Comp 


loss 


Westfield 


loss 


Longmeadow 


loss 


West 




Springfield 


loss 




Freshman Coach Russ Mooney calms down the team and sets up an Junior Varsity Coach Larry Freed huddles with his kids during a time 
offense. out. 



BOYS JV/FRESHMEN BASKETBALL 







Monica Maltby handles the ball. 



VARSITY GIRLS 



Team 




South Hadley 


loss 


Holyoke 


loss 


Cathedral 


loss 


West Springfield 


won 


Westside 


won 


Central 


won 


Agawam 


loss 


East Longmeadow 


won 


Longmeadow 


loss 


South Hadley 


loss 


Chicopee 


loss 


Amherst 


loss 


Northampton 


loss 


East Longmeadow 


won 


Longmeadow 


loss 


Chicopee Comp 


loss 


Northampton 


loss 


Amherst 


loss 


Agawam 


loss 



Team 

South Hadley won 

Holyoke won 

Cathedral loss 

West Springfield loss 

Westfield loss 

Central loss 

Agawam won 

East Longmeadow loss 

Longmeadow loss 

South Hadley won 

Chicopee won 

Amherst loss 

Northampton loss 

East Longmeadow loss 

Longmeadow loss 

Chicopee Comp loss 

Northampton loss 

Amherst loss 

Agawam loss 



Amy Ntzgerald gathers herself for 
the shot. 




VARSITY GIRLS': front row Jackie 
Bushway, Amy Fitzgerald. Becky 
Ross. Middle row Jen Samble, 
Marianne Manseau, Jen Petrozelli, 
Mandy Kober. Back row: Manager 
Kirsten Vinson, Day Devine, 
Coach David Bennett, Allison 
Geldhart, Manager Christy Talbot. 



JV/VARSITY GIRLS BASKETBALL 




Injuries and problems in a season of 

EFFORT 



No one would guess 
by looking at their 5- 
14 record how hard 
the girls' basketball team 
was working, but the athle- 
tic trainor could tell you. 
Judging by the crowd in her 
office everyday before prac- 
tices and games, the team 
should inherit the "walking 
wounded" title from last 
year's soccer team. Senior 
captain Amy Fitzgerald had 
been destroying defenses 
everywhere, averaging 18.5 
points per game in the 
South Madley loss where 
she sprained her ankle. De- 
spite strong efforts against 
Chicopee and Amherst, she 
spent most of her time ei- 
ther injured on the gym 
floor or in the bleachers. 
After re-injuring her ankle in 
the Amherst game, the ear- 
liest she was expected back 
was for the Longmeadow 
game. 

If losing Amy wasn't 
enough, second highest 
scorer, Allison (watch me 
sink another three-pointer) 
Qeldart, also had ankle 
problems. A third starter, 
point guard, Mandy Kober, 
has a painful and unpron- 
ouncable problem with her 
knees. Forward Jen Petru- 

JV GIRLS' BASKETBALL. Front 
row Monica Maltby, Jen Lynch. 
Middle row: Amy Liese, Jen Mark- 
ham, Jen Qrono, Kandy Belcher, 
Kealy O'Brien. Back row Sara Tay- 
lor, Mara Gaudette, Amanda 
Zepke, Lauren Gravelin, Steph- 
anie Pietryka, Coach Lore Simp- 
son. 



zelli just recovers from an 
ankle injury (what's going 
on with the ankles here?) 
and center Day Devine is 
out for the season because 
of knee surgery. Becky Ross 
has had a variety of injur- 
ies, from mono to (guess 
what?) a bad ankle. It 
seems that Coach Bennett 
is the only one who hasn't 
been helped off of the 
court, however, as you all 
know by now, Coach Ben- 
net waited until post season 
to injure his own knee. 

Is there any silver-lining 
to this storm cloud? Of 
course! Because so many 
injuries, Junior Varsity play- 
ers Amy Liese and Jen 
Qrono are seeing some 
good varsity playing time. 
By gaining varsity exper- 
ience as freshmen, they are 
preparing themselves for 
their great varsity careers. 
While watching how many 
ice packers a team can go 
through in one day, be sure 
to watch these two — you'll 
be hearing great things 
about them in a couple of 
years. Until then, send any 
bandages or other medical 
supplies that you can over 
to the new gym. 



JV/VARSITY GIRLS BASKETBALL 







VARSITY 



Chicopee Comp 
Amherst 


won 
lost 


West Springfield 

Holyoke 

Cathedral 


lost 
won 
lost 


Agawam 
Westfield 


won 
lost 


Longmeadow 
Chicopee Comp 
Amherst 


won 
lost 
lost 


West Springfield 

Holyoke 

Cathedral 


won 
won 

lost 


Agawam 
Westfield 


won 
won 


Longmeadow 


won 



JUNIOR VARSITY 



Team 




Ludlow 


lost 


Westfield 


lost 


Amherst 


lost 


Cathedral 


lost 


West Springfield 


won 


Amherst 


lost 


Agawam 


lost 


West Springfield 


tied 


Cathedral 


lost 


Westfield 


lost 



Falcon Hockey: An Image of 

PERSERVERANCE 



'A: 



ny team can win on any 
given night!" Coach 
Marty Kibbe sums up 
well the story of the 1988-1989 
Falcon hockey team — a season 
of many ups and downs. 

The Falcons were rudely 
awakened to life in the Berry Di- 
vision after suffering two unex- 
pected losses to open the season. 
However, Coach Kibbe and his 
players dug deep for their third 
game in which they proved victo- 
rious. However, they realized 
that they would still be forced to 
play catch-up hockey in a divi- 
sion that doesn't treat losing 
teams too well. 

Through it all, the Falcons 
compiled a record of 6-8 through 
14 games of their 18 game sched- 
ule. Coming from a start of 0-2, 
the Falcons exemplified the 
ideals Coach Martin Kibbe tries 
hard to instill in his players — 
perserverance and drive. In fact, 
the Falcons played their toughest 
hockey against some of the 



gest foes in the Berry Division. 

Against both West Springfield 
and Chicopee Comp the Falcon 
skaters rose to the occasion, up- 
seting the favorites. Against West 
Springfield, the Falcons pulled 
out a 6-5 victory that saw the 
team come together as a unit and 
overcome the tenacious offensive 
attack of the Terriers. Tony Rys 
once again proved himself as a 
worthy goaltender by turning 
away a great deal of Westside's 
best attempts. 

Throughout the season, as well 
as the Westside game, the Fal- 
con's strategy included a careful 
balance of both offensive and de- 
fensive attack. The offfense was 
anchored by the first line of Mike 
Schmidt, Noel Smith, and Andy 
Hersman. They were perfectly 
complemented by the second line 
of Brett Knowles, Rick Smith, and 
Tim Camerlin. 

The defense received strong 
showings from Seniors Tim 
Burke, Craig Makuch, and Chris 



Bennett all season long. Junior's 
Jim Cowee and Ryan Huszar 
proved themselves as worthy var- 
sity players by stacking up 
against some tough divisional op- 
ponents, of course, Tony Rys and 
Jeff Bennett played key roles in 
th Falcon defensive scheme by 
protecting the nets in fine fash- 
ion. Tony played like a season 
veteran after seeing only limited 
action last season, and Jeff Ben- 
nett proved to be a worthy asset 
to the Falcon team — registering 
a 10-0 shutout against Holyoke in 
only his first season as a hockey 
player. 

The 1988-1989 season was tru- 
ly a learing experience for the 
Falcon team. Through perserver- 
ance the team came together to 
do battle against tough opponents 
and played like a team full of 
pride. For the Seniors it was a 
season with its highlights, yet for 
Coach Kibbe and the underclass- 
men, it was a season which will 
prove worthy in the future. 




BOYS JV HOCKEY. Front row: Jim Sullivan, Jon Stachelek, Dave Ward, 
Tim Sullivan, Rick Chase, Brian Dolaher. Back row: Coach Marty Kibbe, 
Ryan Barrett, Jeff Mandrela, Jeff Cheiko, Carlos Crespo, Mike Edery, 
Clifford Holt. 



BOYS VARSITY HOCKEY, front row: Chris Rocheford, Mike Gentile, 
Brett Knowles, Tony Rys, Jeff Bennett, Andy Hersman, Craig Makuch. 
Back row: Noel Smith, Tim Camerlin, Mike Schmidt, Tim Burke, Chris 
Bennett, Jim Cowee, Ryan Huszar, Rick Smith, Scott Kertenis, Coach 
Marty Kibbe. 



JV/VARSITY HOCKEY 



Mike Schmidt glides towards the Tony Rys protects the Falcon 
puck. goal. 




Mike Donovan cuts back in order to regain control of the puck. 



JV/VARSITY HOCKEY 







DN THE 
SLOPES 



Every athletic team at Min- 
nechaug makes a great 
deal of effort. But per- 
haps some of the winter season 
teams have to work a little 
harder than the rest. Members of 
our ski team devoted many hours 
to chilly evening practices at 
Berkshire East this year. The 
girls' team was handed a difficult 
challenge as they were promoted 
to "A" Division, while the boys' 
team struggled to retain a re- 
spectable position in the "B" Di- 
vision. Despite a lack of snow, 
senior captains, Jennifer Dear- 
den, Mark Andrews, Greg Le- 



febvre, and Will Thompson kept 
the team alive with their high 
spirits. 

Coach Tim Bishop led the ski 
team to compete in the Western 
Mass. Championships. Seeded 
racers were Kathy Bresette, Bet- 
sy Lertiz, Sue Withington, Mark 
Andrews, Greg Lefebvre, and 
Will Thompson. With the racers' 
talents, both teams scored victo- 
ries on the Giant Slalom and Sla- 
lom courses. Overall, our efforts 
for a winning season were a suc- 
cess. Hopefully, most of our ski- 
ers will return for the 1990 sea- 
son! 





Jennifer Dearden prepares for 
her next turn on the Giant Sla- 
lom course at Berkshire East. 

Greg Lefebvre decides that it is 
easier for him to knock the 
pole over, instead of going 
around it. 




The lack of snow didn't slow Erica Dutil from a great race. 



BOYS/GIRLS' SKIING 




_ 



BOYS' SKI TEAM. Front row: Captains Greg Lefebvre, Will Thompson, and Mark An- 
drews. Back row: Ted Furst, Aaron Pilarcik, Bill Fridlington, Pat Gallaher, Eddie Harris. 
Brendan Halloran, James Troy, Brendan Daly, Coach Tim Bishop. 




t 



GIRLS' SKI TEAM. Front row: Captains Jennifer Dearden, Jessica Winn, and Sue With- 
ington. Back row: Coach Tim Bishop, Elizabeth Leritz, Margaret Dearden, Kathy Bre- 
sette, Sherry Decoteau, Tara Reavey, Sarah Demosthenous, Susan Pierce, Erica Dutil, 

Brendan Halloran and Pat Gallaher show their Falcon spirit by Cathy Gagnon. 

hanging the men's skiing banner before the race. 




Sarah Demosthenous concen- 
trates on her form during her 



Brendan Daly flies down the 
slopes to finish his race. 



BOYS'/GIRLS' SKIING (79 





IBSOR 




PEOPLE DIVIDER 




t's Uhafs 



t 



that Counts 



m 



What makes each of us an individual? Is it the way we talk or the way 
we dress? For some of us maybe, but let's be realistic. We all want to 
"fit in," and most of us go out of our way to be liked. Well, what's 
outside isn't everything. It's just like our parents always tell us — "It's 
what's inside that counts." 

That's right! Appearance isn't everything. Two people could dress alike, 
sound alike, and look alike, and be completely different. The only way to 
find out their differences, would be to discover what they are like on the 
inside. 

Even though we know that appearance is one way that people judge us, 
most of us are smart enough to realize that what makes a person appealing 
is his or her personality and the way we can relate to him or her. We are not 
at the age where appearance is important. Oh well, SOMETHINGS NEVER 
CHANGE! 



Even the fans need a break at football 
games. Ann Berte, Erica Dutil, Diama 
Cerasa, and Mandy Kober take time out 
to chat during Minnechaug's game 
against Cathedral. 



PEOPLE DIVIDER 




Dawn 
Barnes 



Elizabeth 
Belden 



Cynthia 
Beleski 



fieri 
Belliveau 

Robert 
Belliveau 



Christopher 
Bennett 

Jeffrey 
Bennett 

Wendy 
Bennett 




Head Of The Class 



There's always some- 
one behind the 
scenes who gives 
each year's seniors their 
"class ". The class of 1989 
is the classiest in Minne- 
chaug's history and we owe 
it to Mrs. Sager, our class 
advisor. 

Freshman year, when 
there is a hunt for just the 
right person to supervise 
our class, Mrs. Sager was 
the unanimous choice. And 
what better person could 
have been chosen? She 
has guided us through 
thick and thin and made 
sure that all of our activities 
were just right. She has giv- 
en us her limited spare time 
and organized all of our 
functions. If it weren't for 
her, we wouldn't have been 



able to accomplish as 
much. 

The selection of class 
rings was a trying period. 
Mrs. Sager made all of the 
arrangements with the dif- 
ferent companies. When 
each of the officers had a 
different company choosen, 
Mrs. Sager gave us guid- 
ance to realize the one that 
would be best for the whole 
class, not for a particular 
group. 

Senior year she has aided 
in the organization of the 
banquet, senior kick-off 
dance, graduation, the 
prom, and all of the little 
things we do as seniors. 
She teaches Spanish, ad- 
vises the yearbook, guides 
the exchange students, and 
is a friend. 




Four year class presi- 
dent Tom Mango, grins 
as he realizes what a fine 
job Mrs. Sager had done 
in setting up for the 
class's cotton candy 
booth at the Peach Festi- 



Mr. and Dr. Sager take 
time out to pose for a 
picture while vacation- 
ing in Spain. Along with 
being our class advisor, 
she does have other 
things to do. 





Heather 
Ben ting 

Jason 
Bergeron 

Sharon 
Bernardo 



Darrin 
Bilik 



Kevin 
Blomstrom 



Kim 
Boucher 



Lara 


■ 


m 


Brady 




^*ii 


Dennis 


: J« 


~- *# ■ 


Burke 


f 


/ ■ 


Imothy 
Burke 


i 


'4 I 



Jacqueline 
Bush way 




Kimberiy 
Carling 




Atfc 



What's in Store for Us? 



Everyone looks for- 
ward to the obvi- 
ous things, like be- 
ing successful, having 
money, driving a nice 
ear-but we, the seniors at 
Minnechaug have looked 
forward to a few special 
things this year. 

It's obvious to look to- 
ward graduation, and be- 
yond that, college. We all 
will make new friends, 
but also will remember 
that we have the old 
ones to fall back on, as 
well as explore new 
places, some far, and 
others not so far away 
from the halls of Minne- 
chaug. 

The Fifties Day Dance 
held in the cafeteria, the 
banquet at the Hampden 



Country Club, the prom 
at Chez Josef, and 
Graduation at Symphony 
Hall-are all senior activi- 
ties that let us know that 
the times we've spent at 
Minnechaug will soon 
come to an end. 

Along with reflecting 
on our past, we look 
ahead to our futures, 
when we can finally be as 
independent as we've 
tried to be during these 
past four years. Although 
it may be hard for some 
of us, we all look forward 
to the excitement that we 
hope to find in the years 
to come. 

But most of all, we look 
forward to coming back, 
to see old friends. 




Good friends Luci Roda- 
milans and Jeff Zahr 
take time out from swim- 
ming on a hot summer's 
afternoon. 



Mike Tarantino enjoys a 
summer afternoon in his 
best friend Jeff Zahr's 
pool, while having boat 
races with a Fisher Price 
Toy. 



\ - 



:«"■ : 




Christine 
Carlotto 

Kerry 
Cesan 

r\ari 
Chamberlain 



John 
Chambers 



Richard 
Chase 



Karen 
Chech ette 




Erik 
Christensen 



John 
Christie 



Dirk 
Ciarke 



SENIORS 




Kateri 
Collins 



Monica 
Cook 

Fred 
Cooper 

Ann 
Counos 



Danielle 
Couture 

Lynn 
Crafts 

Carlos 
Crespo 



Elizabeth 
Crocker 



Peter 
Danio 



Yeshiva 
Davis 




&rm 




Jennifer 
Dearden 

Richard 
Demarjian 

Catherine 
Dennis 



The Best Kind of Relaxation 



Senior year was a time 
when most of us felt we 
had earned the right to 
let loose, to not care about 
homework on the weekend 
and live it up a little. Any- 
time, anyplace, and any- 
where, it was finally, after 
three years, our turn to party! 
It was during these occa- 
sions that friends felt the 
closest and created more 
memories that would last a 
lifetime. 

First, an occasion was 
needed-Halloween, Christ- 
mas, Hew Year's Eve, a vaca- 
tion, a birthday, a winning 
football game, a half-day, a 
skip-day, and eventually 
graduation were all prime 
candidates for a bash. (Al- 
right, any day, Monday 
through Friday, was just as 



good as any other special 
day.) 

Second, a location was 
needed. An empty house (if 
you were lucky), the woods, 
the Boy Scout Camp, Rocka- 
dundee, or finally at Lake 
Mark seemed to be frequent 
choices. At this destination, 
loud music such as Quns-n- 
Roses, irtXS, Pink Floyd, Led 
Zepplin, R.E.M., was needed 
too. 

Third, you needed the peo- 
ple there. If it were with the 
right group of friends you 
could really have a good 
time. There are times that 
when you are with people 
you don't know it can even 
be more fun, senior year you 
really get to know a lot of 
new people. 




tF + 



At a picnic with some 
friends over the sum- 
mer, Brian McKeon re- 
laxes on the rapids while 
listening to Pink Floyd. 



Jason Bergeron and Jen- 
nifer Doyle spend their 
last free days of summer 
relaxing at a party and 
discussing their plans 
for their final year at Min- 
nechaug. 




Melissa 
Desjardins 

Todd 
Dickinson 






The Final Countdown 



The disease starts the 
first day of senior year 
but it doesn't really af- 
fect anyone until halfway 
through the year. This dread- 
ed disease is known as "sen- 
ioritis ". Seniors experience it 
when they no longer have 
the desire to do work. It's al- 
most guaranteed to appear 
when that final college ac- 
ceptance letter comes. The 
side effects are: no longer 
doing homework, sleeping in 
class, failing tests, skipping 
once a week, and partying 
quite often, rio longer having 
the desire to learn, we find 
ourselves spending more 
time with friends before that 
final day arrives, Graduation. 
Honestly, what is the point 
of wasting all that precious 
time doing tedious work, 



such as: memorizing impor- 
tant dates and events from 
World War II, calculus prob- 
lems, physics labs, comput- 
er programs, etc., when we 
could be out having fun with 
our closest friends. Parents 
say that it is important for us 
to uphold our grades, so that 
we will be successful in col- 
lege and in our future lives. 
Why bother to learn it now, 
when we can worry about it 
when that time arrives. The 
summers are too short, and 
there is never enough time 
on the weekends to be with 
friends, so seeing that it is 
our last year, why not enjoy 
this time while we can? Par- 
ents have a hard time under- 
standing what we are going 
through, but they have to ac- 
cept the way things are! 




One afternoon, Jim 
Wilk gets his first 
spell of senioritis and 
ends up wandering 
around the Eastfield 
Mall. 



Chris Ouimette takes 
advantage of his sen- 
ior study, which is a 
great place to relax. 



Kimberly 
Diotalevi 

Amy 
Donovan 

Bonnie 
Dowd 





Mark 
Dowd 

Jennifer 
Doyle 

Kevin 
Drake 




Caitlin 
Dugan 

Kimberly 
Eaton 

Laurie 
Ellis 



Rebecca 
E merle 



Robert 
Estrada 



Kristina 
Earrah 



Carmen 
Earrow 

Stephen 
Eiedler 

Susan 
Eiore 



SENIORS 



Rebecca 
Fitt 

Amy 
Fitzgerald 

Shannon 
Foley 




Cheering For the Home Team 



The first thing that usually comes to a person's mind 
when they think of school spirit is a cheerleader. How- 
ever, you do not have to be a cheerleader to have 
school spirit. They are there at games to not only show their 
school spirit, but also to encourage the fans to get involved. 
Each individual has some sort of school spirit, whether they 
are willing to admit it or not. Your school spirit might be 
shown by sitting in the rain until the end of a football or 
soccer game, participating in the magazine sales, or by get- 
ting involved in a club or activity. 

The senior class is a spirited one. We have shown our class 
spirit by winning the Battle of the Classes dance two years in 
a row, the only class to have done that in the history of 
Minnechaug, by having successful fundraisers where we all 
became involved, and by showing our enthusiam for projects 
that may occur. We all show our school spirit in different 
ways. Whether it be painting our faces green and white for 
that important game, participating in a pep rally, or just 
favoring Minnechaug and the home team, the Falcon spirit is 
always there. The people may change from year to year, but 
the spirit remains the same. 



Christine 
Froehlich 

Denis 
Gagnon 

John 
Galarneau 




■P 






Greg Lefebvre, along with 
the other members of the 
varsity soccer team, shows 
his spirit at the big game 
against rival school, Cathe- 
dral. 



At every home football 
game, you were able to find 
Kim Diotalevi cheering the 
Falcons on to victory. 





Michael 
Gentile 



Jessica 
Oianantoni 



Todd 
Gibbs 




Christoper 
Goebel 

Jason 
Goodrich 

John 
Goodrich 



Fredrick 
Gore 

Michael 
Gralinski 



Lynda 
Granaudo 



Amy 
Greene 

Penny 
G ris wo Id 

G retch en 
Mall 



b 




Linda 
Herbert 




Kimberly 
hertz 



Lee 

tligginbottom 




Susan 
tiuszar 

Bruno 
lacolo 

Brian 
Ingerson 



$ 




* 



ftjt 



*<* 



William 
Jackson 

Mary Beth 
Jacobs 

Michael 
Jarvis 



Off to a Great Start 



As you walked through 
the doorway into the 
gym, you could see 
the people that you've spent 
the last three years of high 
school with, talking amongst 
themselves in little groups. 
But as soon as the music 
started, the class of '89 was 
united as one. This was our 
first offical senior activity, 
The SeniorKick-off Dance, 
which was held on Septem- 
ber 17, 1988. This dance 
wasn't like any other we had 
been to; it was ours, and 
ours alone. 

Many memories were 
made that night, such as 



Mike Pietryka's impression of 
Joan Jett, Chris Morissette's 
guitar solo and impression of 
Axl Rose, the entire class 
forming a train around the 
gym to the Locomotion, and 
dancing with friends. The 
most lasting impression 
made that evening was the 
unity among the class. For 
just one night, we were able 
to put aside all of our little 
cliques, and be ourselves. 

Although we are looking 
forward to graduating, and 
going off in our own direc- 
tions, we will always remem- 
ber the closeness that was 
felt that night. 





At the end of the dance, 
Becky Morton, waits in 
the gym to see what all 
of her friends are doing 
afterwards. 



Before going back inside 
to the dance, Estella 
Kra ne nbu rg looks 
around outside in the 
courtyard and heads to- 
wards the food tables. 




Ellen 
Jensen 

Cynthia 
Johnson 

Michelle 
Johnson 



® 



Jeffrey 
Jones 

Robert 
Joyal 

Erica 
Kanzinger 



Amy 
Hasten 

Timothy 
Kealy 

Eric 
Heeler 




What's to Come? 



What is going to become of us in 20 years? In 
10 years? What about next year? We will all 
be going on to college and leaving the se- 
cure surroundings of Wilbraham and Hampden be- 
hind. Each of us is wondering how we will "fit in" at 
the school we choose to go to. What if we are not 
accepted like we are here at Minnechaug. 

Whenever you attempt something different and 
new, there are always going to be some insecurities 
that go along with it. What if we don't adjust to life 
after college? Many of us worry about getting a good 
job, being successful, and most importantly, happy. 
Fears are a big part of everyone's life. The scariest 
fear that we have is the one towards the future. We 
are unsure of how the world is going to change, and 
of how we will change with it. We have to learn to face 
our fears in order to deal with them, and get rid of 
them. Although this may be hard for some, the mem- 
bers of the class of '89 should have no problem 
adjusting. 




Taking a break from a 
test, Yeshiva Davis 
asks herself why she 
has to take this test 
anyway. 



Jackie Bushway re- 
laxes after the Battle 
of the Classes Dance, 
and thinks about 
what she is going to 
do after high school. 





Tammy 
Keeton 

Jennifer 
Kennedy 

Mich el e 
Kennedy 



Brett 
Knowles 

Estella 
Kranenburg 

Karianne 
Kraus 










Karin 
Krawiec 

Troy 
Ladue 

Jennifer 
Land berg 



Andrew 
Lapierre 

Kevin 
Lash way 

Cheri 
Methe 



$ 



— — — 1 . % y ^U, 1 



fcal' 



THAT WAS THEN 






&? 






r; 



»r». 






fef^$$ 




A%*J 







a 



THAT WAS THEM 










ESjto? 1 




Gregory 
LeFebvre 

Kathleen 
LeFebvre 

Sharon 
Leung 



Jeffrey 
Luttrell 

Gina 
Luvera 

Craig 
Makuch 




Lynn 
Maloney 

Thomas 
Mango 

Marianne 
Marchesseau 



Marcelo 
Mariani 



Christine 
Martin 



Shannon 
Martin 








Our Time, Our Year 



We go through school 
anticipating our sen- 
ior year, now it has 
finally arrived, and it is our 
turn to be important. As sen- 
iors, we have more freedom, 
later curfews, less spare time 
to spend with our families, 
and more responsibilities. We 
are expected to act mature, 
like the young adults that ev- 
ery seems to think we are. 
What about our wild period? 
When can we experience that 
if we are always so busy? 
Don't worry, we all find the 



time to rebel a little and cause 
a ruckus. We are seniors, we 
are supposed to have fun, 
after all, it is our year. Mow we 
choose to spend our time is 
entirely up to us. We can be- 
come "stressed out - ' if we 
thrive on school alone, or we 
could relax aand live a little 
during our last year at Minne- 
chaug. No matter how we fill 
up our days, they should not 
be wasted because this is our 
time and our year to enjoy 
ourselves. 




Heather Benting 
volunteers her 
time at the Wilbra- 
ham Children's 
Museum, helping 
with the game 
booths at the Ted- 
dy Bear Picnic. 



Danielle Couture 
spends a free 
afternoon watch- 
ing the boy's var- 
sity soccer game 
against Holyoke. 





Kris ten 
Mastroianni 

Todd 
Matthews 

Kerry 
McAleer 



Keitha 
McDonald 

Kelly 
McDonald 

Rebecca 
McFeeters 




Eric 
McGranahan 



Rebecca 
Mclssac 




You've Got a Friend 



As we grow older, we realize that some relationships 
change, but the most important ones will always ex- 
ist. Senior year was our time to create the friendships 
and memories that would last forever. 

After all, if we weren't supposed to keep in touch with these 
people, then why are reunions held for us every five years? 
During our senior year, we find ourselves bonding more 
closely to the people we care the most about. Whether it be a 
boyfriend/girlfriend, or a best friend, the times that we spend 
with these people will probably be some of the most memo- 
rable ones. 

We rely on our friends for most everything; companion- 
ship, support, and love. They are always there for us when 
we need somone to listen, advise, or just hug. Friends are 
the most important things in our lives. Without them, where 
would we be? Senior year we discover who our true friends 
are, and the bonds that we have with them become stronger 
than ever. Sure we will meet new people when we go away to 
collegs, but the people we'll remember the most, are the 
ones from our senior year. 



Mike Tarantino 
and Peter Spellios 
wait until their 
shift starts at the 
Key Club booth at 
the Peach festi- 
val, so that they 
will no longer be 
bored. 



Karianne Kraus 
and Kim Eaton en- 
joy seeing each 
other again before 
school starts at a 
back to school 
party held in late 
August. 



Christopher 
Meisner 





Kara 
Metzger 

Pamela 
Mikaelian 

Corinn 
Miller 




Dawn 
Minnon 

Melissa 
Moreno 

Christopher 
Morissette 




Rebecca 
Morton 

Marq 
Mosier 

Kenneth 
Motyl 



Timothy 
Muir 

Allison 
Mullett 

Christina 
Munroe 



Jeffrey 
O'Shaughnessy 

Christopher 
Ouimette 









Knsten 
Piscioneri 

Kathleen 
Podosek 

Carol 
Popsun 




George 
Poulopoulos 

Susan 
Raffaele 

John 
Raschi 



What Makes Us Special? 



Senior year. That's a difficult thing to describe in only 
one page and in a few hundred words. But senior year 
does bring with it certain little privileges, extras let's 
call them. These "little extras'' tend to make the year even 
more interesting and if not better, more unforgettable. 

The first privilege any senior will guess, of course is senior 
study. High school kids feel very mature when they have an 
entire study hall room filled with only other seniors. And, an 
added bonus: we can talk, and if the furniture is left intact, we 
can move it around. Many seniors will admit that they "live" 
for their studies. It's a chance to relax, and feel a little more 
important than a senior may actually be. Many adventurous 
seniors like to sign our of the senior study, and explore the 
media center without a library pass. Yes, we are allowed to 
enter this exciting place with only our coveted student l.D. 
And, if we are on our best behavior, Mr. Bernstein may not 
send us back to study again. 

Ever wonder why seniors pray for snow and will stay up all 
night watching the weather channel on t.v? Another senior 
privilege, along with saying goodbye to the hallowed halls of 
Minnechaug three weeks before everyone else,(con't . . 




Greg Lefebvre and 
Jeff O'Shaugh- 
nessy wait in front 
of the school to 
have their senior 
pictures taken on 
a very "hot" day 
during July. 




Stacey 
Richmond 



® 




Luciana 
Rodamilans 





':sW 


m^m 


Mario 


J&. 




->driguez 

Enrique 
Romeo 






Kirsten 




v_ 


Root 




;ib 




It Couldn't be Done 



... ) is that seniors don't have to make up for any 
snow days. If only the weather would cooperate! 

Seniors create an aura of superiority and respect 
wherever they go. To us, it is not a privilege, but a 
right after spending 3 years at the bottom. But unfor- 
tunately, with superiority, comes that awful word, 
stress. Any senior that says that they are not, as Mr. 
Kenney so eloquently puts it, "maxi-stressed out", is 
either a compulsive liar, or has already lost a grip on 
reality. Seniors are awarded the privilege of trying to 
stay sane. We must attempt this feat while trying to 
stay awake in class, keeping our grades up, finishing 
our college applications, and trying to have the most 
fun we possibly can. Add to this a part-time job, a 
sport and a few extra-curricular activities and you 
have the well-rounded student, and the typical "privi- 
leged" senior. Why isn't this one privilege appreciat- 
ed at all? 

no matter what the so-called benefits of being a 
senior are, one thing is for certain, the experience of 
being a senior is one that will never be forgotten. 



am 




Chris Morissette 
sits in the cafete- 
ria during first 
lunch, and won- 
ders why his pic- 
ture is being tak- 



Mike Pietryka 
helps set up the 
game booths at 
the Wilbraham 
Children's Muse- 
um for the Teddy 
Bear Picnic held 
on Oct. 15. 



* - 






Martha 
Rosati 

Rebecca 
Ross 

Lynn 
Rutstein 



Carrie 
Ryan 

Kristen 
Rys 

Wendy 
Sanderson 




Dennis 
Santos 



Jason 
Sares 



William 
Scarlett 



John 
Schaefer 



Michael 
Schmidt 



Hathan 
Scott 



® 




Kimberiy 
Smith 

MacGregor 
Smith 




Dear Minnechaug Graduate: 



This letter to the future is written for you as you thumble 
through your dusty old book many years from now in 
preparation for a class reunion hoping it will help you 
remember the name of that guy who always sat in the front of 
the room. 

We can't tell today how much is going to change over the 
next 10, 20, or 30 years. We can only guess. We now look at 
yearbooks from 1979 and laugh at the hairstyles. We see year- 
books from 1969 and think they have come from another 
world. 

What will we will laugh at in the future, our clothes, our hair? 
We can't know. One thing does show through in this book, our 
youthful idealism, the feeling that we can do something to 
change the world. That each one of us makes a difference. 

Our parents once felt that way too. How, many of them have 
lost some of that idealism. Did you lose yours? Please don't 
laugh at ours. We're allowed: we're young. Realism would be 
wasted on us. 

Mow are you, Minnechaug graduate? Mow is life? Are you a 
success? Failure? Are you where you dreampt of being when 
you were a senior? What do you wish you had known back 
then? Speak up! Mistakes are part of life, aren't they? Don't 
regret them. 

Well, future, you're too far away to worry about now . . . aren't 
you? — Bill Jackson 




Kim Boucher 
getws into the Hal- 
loween spirit and 
tries to accom- 
plish some work at 
the library during 
a senior study. 

During her D- 
block art class, 
Sharon Leung 
works intently on 
her drawing of Es- 
tella Kranenburg. 





Amy 
Stone 

Scott 

Stratton 

Mark 
Streeter 



Shawn 
Sullivan 

Amy 
Sutcliffe 

Mark 
Szymanski 



Amy 
Takorian 

Christy 
Talbot 

Michael 
Tarantino 




If Only I Had 



Admit it, you've regretted something, haven't you? 
Maybe just once you heard yourself saying, "if only 
Ihad ... " It's okay. Regrets are a part of every- 
one's life. You aren't alone. 

Whether it was the fact that you didn't ask that cute guy/ 
girl in your morning class to the semi-formal, or that you 
didn't take Miss Brewer's Senior Seminar class, or that you 
didn't push yourself hard enough to get that A, we have all 
had to face up to the decisions that we have made, no 
matter how bad they may have been. 

We have to believe that things happen for the best, and 
if something was meant to happen, then it would. Howev- 
er, this is highly unlikely. We would all like to believe that 
we could change the world, no matter how small our 
contribution may be. If things don't work out the way that 
we had planned them to, we blame ourselves, and usually 
end up regretting the decisions that we made. 

It is easy to make mistakes, everyone does. However, we 
can't go through life wishing that we had or hadn't done 
something. Life goes on after all of the mistakes, we just 
have to find the positive side of life and learn to live with 
that. 





Becky Emerle vol- 
unteers for Key 
Club by directing 
traffic for the walk 
for the homeless 
in downtown 
Springfield during 
May. 

Tim Burke and 
Will Thompson of- 
fer their spare 
time to work at 
Habitat for Hu- 
manity, an organi- 
zation building 
low-income hous- 
ing. 



James 
Thompson 





William 
Thompson 

Kevin 
Trombly 

John 
Tucker 




Deborah 
Tupek 

Paula 
Turcotte 

Patricia 
Tumberg 



Lisa 
Urzedowski 

Douglas 
Valentin! 

Gregory 
Van Mom 



Barbara 
Vecchio 



Denise 
Vermette 



Inaki 
Vinaixa 



Melissa 
Vincent 






Kirsten 
Vinson 


I " * 1 




Mark 
Warga 


K Jj 







Douglas 
Wentworth 



Robert 
Williams 


jp>m&v\ 


* 


Colleen 
Wilson 


*l 


Mark 
Wing 












^t^i 




Jeffrey 
Zahr 




Mark 
Zajac 

Christopher 
Zeo 

Michael 
Zhe 



Last Class of the 80's 



When the evening of December 31, 1988 
arrives, this year's graduating class will 
have more to celebrate than any other. 
Why? Because the seniors are the last class of the 
eighties. The new year, 1989, is bound to be one to 
remember, and the class of '89 will have some- 
thing to do with that. 

The Class of '89 will remember the eighties as a 
time of happiness, sadness, and specialness. They 
will remember what made history . . the Chal- 
lenger explosion, the space shuttle Discovery, 
Reagen being shot, Disney's 50th anniversary, and 
much more. 

The last class of the eighties is one that is full of 
people with special talents. There are athletes, 
scholars, musicians, philosophers, the list goes 
on. 

Although the turn of the decade is bound to take 
on any challenge, we are a class of determination, 
and although some things will inevitably change, 
that is one thing that will not. 



Seniors Not Pictured 



Alan Bissonnette; Richard Batts; Robert Campbell; Roderick 
Campbell; Laura Champigny; Rony Chung; Derek Debarge; 
Laura Cipriani; Craig Donnet; Kevin Downey; Artis Falls; Sean 
Gardner; Chester Green; Stephen Holegir; David Hodges; Tim 
Lavoie; Kelli Leone; Frank Miodowski; Derek Moran; Cynthis 
Perusse; Daniel Putnam; Ramon Robles; Brian Rosati; Tina 
Rubner; Ko Shimizy; Jody Sowa; Rachel Taylor; Philip Ten- 
erowicz; Chris Valiquette; Michael Waite; and Jeffrey Warner. 




^ ^ 



Diane 
Barry 



Mot wanting to go home 
after school, Mark Shee- 
han relaxes outside, and 
lends his support to the 
soccer team at a home 
game. 





During first lunch, Jen 
Riek is able to manage a 
smile while eating her 
lunch. 



Kirsten Root enjoys herself during 
the recreation of the 1920s in 
Miss Brewer's Senior Seminar 
class. Roaring Twenties day was 
held on November 22. 




Jackie Bushway 
and Rob Dionne 
show their 
dancing skills 
during the 
tewenties day 
Charleston 
competition. 

Raring to go, 
Peter Spellios 
psyches himself 
up for the music 
so he can begin 
his rendition of 
the Charleston. 



More Than Just History 



Of all of the electives at Minne- 
chaug, Senior Seminar is prob- 
ably the most open. Students are 
not just there to be lectured, 
they are there to participate, and 
sometimes run the class. In the 
B-block class, Carlos Crespo and 
Mia Robinson led the discussion 
of Johhny Got A Qun, a novel on 
the affects of war on an average 
teenager. Mike Pietryka played 
Johnny in order to demonstrate 
the emotions of the character. 
He was placed on a desk, bond- 
ed hands and feet, and unable to 
see, talk, or smell. In G-block, 
the discussions are just as cre- 
ative. Miss Brewer took the role 
of "Coercion" and Steve Fiedler 
became "Adultery. What a cou- 
ple they made! 

Other than book discussions, 
personal intrests are discussed, 
and of course, history. Debates 
and trials are unique ways of 
learning the material. We learn 
more by getting involved thatn 
we would if we memorized dates. 
Through this, we feel a sense of 
personal achievement. 



Media teams are another 
change of pace. "Captains 
please," Miss Brewer will call 
and chaos begins. Groups of 
kids run to find their teammates 
and attempt the assignment, 
whether it be a puzzle or a cross- 
word, Halloween happenings, or 
learning the Charleston. On Hal- 
loween, the creation of the first 
wine coolers, and the People's 
Court won the judging for best 
skits. Celebrating the spirit of the 
20's, media team E dominated 
the competion with each of its 
members placing in one event, 
no one will ever forget the 
unique dance skills of Marianne 
Marchesseault and Mario Rodri- 
guez; and our very own hit man, 
Vinnie Capollo, a.k.a. Jeff Dema- 
vich. 

At the end of the year, media 
teams work together to create 
their own projects dealing with 
important events and interests. 

You never know what to ex- 
pect when the bell rings and you 
walk through the door into K-18. 



Gangsters John Christie and Mike 
Pietryka reach for their guns to 
show that they are ready for any 
surprises that may happen. 





John Howell, Peter Spellios, Jim 
Wilk, Jeff O'Shaughnessy, John 
Christie, Brett Knowles, Carlos 
Crespo, and Mike Pietryka model 
their 20s day fashions. 

Jen Doyle, the winner of the G- 
block costume contest, works up 
a sweat doing the Charleston with 
partner Tom Mango. 



A 



One Last Thought 



We dreamed of it from the first day 
we entered the halls of Minnechaug. 
Everyone predicted what our four 
years here would be like, some pre- 
dictions came true, some weren't 
even close to what we expected. But, 
we knew it would be an experience 
that we would never forget. 

Freshman year was spent getting 
adjusted to the school and the other 
people who knew where they were go- 
ing. Sophomore year, we got our 
class rings and really began to feel 
like a part of the school. We hardly 
got picked on either. Junior year 



meant keeping the grades up, and 
thinking about college. Senior year fi- 
nally arrived. College applications, 
senior activities, close friendships 
and at times, a carefree feeling were 
all important aspects of our life this 
final year. 

We all had our up and down times, 
our own decisions to make, and our 
share of fun to have. As we leave Min- 
nechaug, we reflect back and know 
that we all have some wonderful 
memories that will stay with us for- 
ever. 



* 



<$&& 

WK* 



*; 




Danielle Couture and Tina Farrah re- 
lax in Senior Study and discuss what 
they did over the weekend. 

After the Battle of the Classes Dance, 

Sue lianrahan curls up on the couch Getting out of a boring Senior Study, Kevin Drake, Greg 

and tries to stay awake. Sherman, and Mark Sheehan pass their time in the li- 








Jeff Bennett works on creating the 
right design while helping at 
Hampden's Harvest Days on Octo- 
ber 1 and 2 at the face painting 
booth. 




During a Senior Study, Laurie 
Ellis chats while trying to study 
for a programming test in com- 
puters F-block. It is hard to get 
anything done in senior study, 
because we have so much free- 
dom. 

Tajzha Perry prepares herself 
with work to do during her bor- 
ing Senior Study. 



Kevin Trombly is hard at work hosing down 
the long line of cars waiting to have their 
cars washed at the Key Club car wash held 
on September 24. 



$ 



Kristi Albano 

Diane Alves 

Christopher Anzalone 

Daniel Ashton 

Oliver Asmar 

Christopher Baer 

William Bailey 

Christine Baker 

Michelle Beaupre 

David Belcher 

Clark Bennett 

Carrie Benoit 

Sandra Bernard 

Jennifer Bernardo 

Nichole Blaser 

Eileen Blomberg 

Piicole Brady 

Meredith Braskie 

Douglas Bunnell 

Kathleen Burke 

Mark Burns 

Karen Callahan 

Nicole Carroll 

James Champigny 

Jeffrey Chiecko 

Bonita Chung 

Christine Clark 

Benjamin Connell 

James Connell 

Eric Courchesne 

Anne Courtney 

Deborah Courtney 

James Cowee 

Julie Crafts 

Stephanie Crivelli 

Rebecca Crocker 
William Crocker 
Amy Davidson 
Lisa Deblois 
James Deforest 
David Desimone 
June Desjardins 

Day Devine 

Jennifer Dickinson 

Joseph Dillon 

Frank Dolan 

Susan Dowd 

Michelle Duby 

Melissa Eisold 




ft fl ftp 










Good friends, Jodi Garceau, 
Amy Davidson, and Rob Kum- 
ming sit and enjoy a falcon 
football game in October. 




My Funniest Experience was 



44 



o 



ne day when I 
was up at Mrs. 
Kline's desk 
stapling papers, I saw a 
tape on her desk. I was 
curious to see what group 
a teacher would be inter- 
ested in. Much to my sur- 
prise, it was Iron Maiden. 
When the class jokingly 
questioned her musical 
taste, Mrs. Kline con- 
fessed that she was a clos- 
et head banger. Instead of 
admitting that it was a 
tape which she had confis- 
cated from a student, she 
played along with the 
class. She laughed for 
about 5 minutes. The joke 
was made even funnier by 
such an unexpected reac- 
to teasing by stu- 
" — Amy Davidson 



I 



4 4 T" t was ln tfie ^ uncn 

room. Accidental- 
I y someone 
pulled out Christine 
Clarke's chair. Unknow- 
ingly she went to sit down 
while drinking her milk, 
and carrying her pizza. 
She ended up sitting on 
the floor, and her milk 
spilled all over her." — 
Bree Forcier 



44 



i 



t was when I was 
walking down the 
stairs, and my 



Trying to get the tube over the pole. Caro- 
lee Salerno participates in the school spirit 



foot slipped, and I ended contest at the Peach restivaK 
up sitting down in the mid- 
dle of the stairway, while 
everyone was walking 
over me trying to get to 
their next class." — Kim 
Kujath 



44 



o 



tion 
dents. 



ne night I had a 
dream that I 
could swim the 
crawl stroke with one leg 
straight out of the water. 
When I told everyone 
about it, soon the whole 
swim team was swim- 
ming with legs sticking 
out all over the place. " — 
Jennifer Lavoie 



44 



a; 



a basketball 
game, I did a 
cossak, and 
Carolee Salerno accident- 
ly tripped me. I ended up 
falling backwards into the 
bleachers. " — Stacey Wil- 
son 




Lisa Manning enjoys a evening at Papa Gino's on During her D-block art class. Amy Rice takes a break 
Boston Road after selling raffle tickets for the Key from doing her work to talk to the other people in 
Club. class. 




Eric Ellison 
Maria Ferreira 
Susan Fiedler 
Francis Flynn 

John Fonte 



Bree Forcier 
Joseph Frade 

David Garabedian 
Jodi Garceau 

Matthew Geboskie 



Doria Genza 

Frank Gerhard 

David Gibb 

Lori Gil 

Beth Gillen 



Kimberly Goodreau 

William Goodwin 

Raymond Gore 

Khristopher Gregoire 

Daniel Grondalski 



Mark Haggerty 

Jill Hanson 

Danielle Harris 

Andrew Hersman 

Erik Hess 



Tina Hill 

Kathryn Hoffman 

Ryan Huszar 

Mark lsham 

Jonathan Jablonski 



Heath Jackson 
Sara Jenkins 

Michelle Jones 
Jennifer Jose 
Nicole Keller 



Lisa Kennedy 

Scott Kertenis 

Steven Kibbe 

Kenneth Kilduff 

Stanley Komla 



Encka Kostka 

Kim Kujath 

Matthew Kullberg 

Robert Kumming 

Christian Kuselias 



Robert Labadorf 

Mary Lapierre 

Jennifer Lavoie 

Jennifer Lech 

Denise Lesniak 




H| €% *ty ^ *b 




a *a 



m #•- 1 m 



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s 



Beth Gillen cheers the 
Falcons on at a J.V. Foot- 
ball game played on the 
Minnechaug field. 




Doug Zephir, Tony Rys, Kathy Maenzo, and 
Don Wiseman sit outside of their homeroom 
and wait for the teacher to unlock the door. 

Mike Sargent enjoys an evening at Friendly' s 
after the Madrigals sang in the winter concert. 




My Favorite Movie Has to be . 



44' 



hree Fugitives was the 

j j funniest movie I ever 

-^-' saw. I was in a bad mood 

when I walked into the theater and 

left with much improved spirits." 

— Julie Niederfringer 



44 1 



he Great Outdoors was 
1 1 my favorite movie. It 
-*- was the funniest movie 
that I saw all summer. Probably be- 
cause it was the only movie that I 
saw all summer. " — Jim Camerllin 



44 



R 



ainman, because it 
dealt with something 
not usually seen in the 
movies. It really played on human 
emotions." — Nicole Keller 



r s -y^ iehard. There was so 
I 1 much suspense that I did 
-I—/ not know what was go- 
ing to happen next. It was very en- 
joyable." — Bonnie Watson 



44 



R 



ainman. Because Tom 
Cruise was in it. — 
Kathy Hoffman 



44 



etter off Dead was my fa- 
vorite movie, because it 
was so hysterical." — 
Stephanie Crivelli 



B 



JUNIORS 







Brandy Renn works diligently on painting a child's face 
while working at Laughing Brook's Harvest Days for Key 
Club. 




Wai-Min Leung 






i 


Anna Lewenczuk 


^JBB». 


&t 


Michael Ligarski 


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Judith Lussier 


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W~ 9 


Michael Lynch 


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v m 


Catherine Maenzo 


jgL M 


J ' -U 


Natercia Magalhaes 
Lisa Manning 


tk\ \ > 


i lj j . ^^ 


Marianne Manseau 


f* 




Dennis Martial 

Torrie Martineau 

Anthony Mascaro 

Dina Mascaro 


f*- 4$ 


Dawn Mather 




■' v y -■ t 


Serge McCray 


K mi m^ 




Bonnie Mcelroy 


£BbBBBl 


4 \ v ' ' 


Keith McFarland 






Shelly McQrath 




,?A #») 


Brent McKinnon 


r ' 1 


Chad Meisner 


F-= -- H 


Robert Melcher 


4 


'»;..' t ■ "* 1 


Robert Mellon 

Jennifer Mendrala 

Suzanne Messier 


" i 


1 ^B«9 


Suzanne Messier 
Eric Methe 


** 


i 


Kevin Miller 


Jl%} 


Jn4 JrU 


Thomas Moore 


W+Jm 


Carta Morgan 


v 


k i J 


Sheila Moriarty 


i ■ 


i ..JIml 


Christopher Morris 




HI 


Julie Motyl 




s Wmmm 


Sarah Muir 






Randall Myers 

Michael Nadolski 

Gina Ng 




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Julie Niederfringer 


v w li .j 


Gregory O'Connor 


If; V 


Nancy Orquiola 




«S(k '^Sf ^zl •—* 


Kimberly Oyler 




hb^ i^m ' r ~ ——■ 


Diana Pabich 






Rachelle Paternosto 


^% 




Jennifer Petruzelli 


4Bwl & 


w 


Kathryn Post 
Patrick Quinn 


("7 *^' 


Kathleen Raczka 


m £- 


Brandy Renn 


1 % 


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Amy Rice 




■nfli 


Molly Rhim 







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Will Squeglia finishes off his third milk during lunch. 
During football season, he needs to keep up on his 
calcium intake, in order to keep up his strength and 
endurance . 

Taking a break while the contest is underway, demon- 
strator, Katie Burke watches as the Minnechaug team 
propels itself into the lead. 




£ ? ri -0 il^ 



4} -f^lfi 



,v> 




Kimberly Roberts 

Cynthia Robinson 

James Robinson 

Christopher Rocheford 

Richard Ross 



Right now Yd like to be 



Co-captain of the J.V. cheerleaders, varsity al- 
ternate, Tara Wholley, performs at a football 
game with the varsity squad. 




44 



A 



t any beach in the 
world. I love the beach, 4 4 
because I enjoy being 

near the ocean and sleeping on the 

sand." — Laura White 



I 



would like to go to the Ba- r r -y n Europe. I've seen the pic- 

hamas to get a tan and par I tures of it. It looks interest- 

ty with the natives. " A ing and sounds like a good 

— Julie Crafts place to go. (besides — there's no 

drinking age!)" — Bree Forcier 



44 



I 



would like to be in Las Ve- 
gas, so that I could gamble 
and become a millionaire. " 
— Stephanie Crivelli 



44 



he Carribean would be 
nice, because the water 
-*- is so clear that you can 
see the fish. " — Kim Kujath 



44 



i 



n Italy. It's my hertitage. 
and I have always wanted 
to go there, but I have nev- 
er had the chance. " — Jennifer La- 
voie 



Rob Labadorf relaxes as he listens to a 
guest speaker one Thursday night at a Key 
Club meeting. 

J.V. cheerleader co-captain, Kathy Hoffman 
leads the squad in a cheer at the afters- 
chool game. 





My most memorable moments are 



"S 



pending time on the week- 
ends watching movies 
with my boyfriend. ' ' — 
Molly Rhim 



(4 T ulie Miederfringer remem- s s 
I bers the time when she was 
** getting off of the bus, with 
everyone watching her, and falling Gibb 
as she crossed in front of the bus. " 



I 



can remember when Jodi 
Garceau beat me up. I was 
so embarrassed. " — Dave 



"W- 



£ 



remember walking 
the Beach Dance 

e s h m a n year 
through the dirt road in freezing 
weather with shorts on. We saw all 
of our friends coming from Nancy 
Orquiola's house. Eileen Blomberg 
was running and fell into a thorn 
bush." — Kathy Hoffman and Su- 
zanne Messier 



44 



i 



enjoyed spending my week- 
ends with my friends at 
Denny's, but we don't do 
that anymore. " — Andy Hersman 



I 



LL~¥~ enjoy being in Mr. Silva 's 
algebra 2 class, because he 
never gets upset with the 
class, and he always finds the time 
to joke around. This is one of the 
classes where I don 't feel personally 
pressured. He sees to it that no one 
feels dumb. " — Amy Davidson 



ft r 




f); 




4^ 




Tia Rovithis 
Robert Roy 
Richard Royer 
Thomas Ruscio 
Antony Rys 
Christopher Sala 



Carolee Salerno 
Jennifer Samble 
Jennifer Sanders 
Michael Sargent 
Stephen Scannapieco 
Todd Schneider 



Earl Schofield 
Lawrence Shay 
Michael Smith 
Noel Smith 
Cynthia Soja 
Kari Soltoski 



Ronda Sommerville 
Mark Spillane 
William Squeglia 
Thomas Streeter 
Amy Sullivan 
Timothy Sullivan 



Kelly Swartz 
Mia Thomas 
John Thorpe 
Rebecca Triggs 
Daniel Urlage 
Kenneth Vedovelli 



Jason Walbridge 
Robert Ward 
Shelly Waterhouse 
Bonnie Watson 
John Welch 
Darrin White 



Laura White 
Bryce Whiting 
Tara Wholley 
Stacey Wilson 
Jessica Winn 
Donald Wiseman 



Susan Withington 
Scott Wright 
Scott Wyman 
Douglas Zephir 
Paul Zollner 




Kim Roberts appears to be 
enjoying herself while she 
watches the School Spirit 
contest at the Peach Festi- 
val this September. 










Amy Davidson and Jodi 
Garceau watch the Peach 
festival parade. 



Trying to hid from the camera. Sue Fiedler talks with Becky 
Emerle as they work the Key Club peach toss booth. 



Denise Allard 

James Anderson 

Nicholas Andre 

Adam Apple 

Candace Arslanian 

Emily Ascolillo 



April Ashwell 
Omar Asmar 
Deanna Bailey 
Amy Barber 
Ryan Barrett 
Xenophon Beake 



Stephen Belden 

Eric Belliveau 

Anne Berte 

Kristopher Bertelli 

Nancy Bigos 

Brian Bishop 



Shawn Blair 

Jason Bleau 

James Blondek 

Nicole Bolek 

Brian Borsari 

Michael Briotta 



Chad Brown 
Charles Brown 
Heather Brown 
Roger Bmnelle 
Kevin Burger 
Melissa Burke 



Bradley Burnette 
Timothy Camerlin 
Kristen Campbell 
Sean Campbell 
Jason Can- 
Ronald Carr 



Diama Cerasa 

Molly Cesan 

Andrea Chechile 

Elizabeth Childs 

James Clark 

Cathleen Collier 



Colleen Coupal 

Scott Croteau 

Steven Croteau 

Brendan Daly 

Tara Daly 

Christopher Daniele 



Jeffrey Daniels 

Sarah 

Demosthenous 

Ralph Dill 

Norma Dinoia 

Brian Dolaher 

Michael Donovan 



Jeremy Draper 

Erica Dutil 

Michael Edery 

Erica Ellis 

Kristen Ealzone 

John Earrell 




m #*/ 






£ 



is i*j 



#1 




i 




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> 



Courtney Ware performs 
exceptionally well on the 
balance beam during a 
home gymnastics meet. 



SOPHOMORES 




Bngitte Pelouze relaxes at the boy's varstiy 
soccer game, after she just finished playing in 
a rough field hockey game. 

Jennifer Lucarelle takes the time to talk to a 
class mate while there is time left at the end of 
her class. 




/ Could Have Died When . . . 



44 



M* 



Lagunowich taught 
his class while stand- 
ing on top of the heat- 
Heather Wages 



44 



i 



n Project Adventure, I was 
the first in the class to 
cross the high wire. If I 
could have seen myself in that hel- 
met with that look on my face. I 
must have been scared out of my 
wits." — Sara Taylor 



44 



hen Brendan Rohan 
tripped Susan Pierce 
in biology, and she fell 
flat on her face. " — Denise A I lard 



W 



44 



w 



hall. 



hen my best friend fell 
down the stairs in be- 
tween J hall and K 
Jermey Draper 



44 



w 



hen I saw an unknown 
student accidently 
step on a mayonnaise 
container, which exploded and cov- 
ered the cashier. " — Anonymous 



44 



w 



hen Peter Duran 
hadn't memorized his 
poem for English 
class, so he faked a fall in which he 
hurt his arm, and had to go to the 
nurse to get out of class. " — Clay 
Holds worth 



SOPHOMORES 



fr 



Sarah Hsiao gets help for her shin splints 
from her soccer coach Mr. Balser. She need- 
ed to rest after a hard game. 

Heather Brown takes a break from playing 
at the football game, for the band is not 
required to play during halftime. 




What it is Like Being a Sophomore 



Life as a sophomore, who needs 
it? Being a sophomore has no 
attraction to it, no glamour. By 
the time a student has reached the 
sophomore status, high school is no 
longer new, but neither have they 
been there long enough to get special 
privileges. We are not able to do wild 
and crazy things. As for the social as- 
pect, it isn't much brighter than being 
a freshman. We aren't old enough to 
be admitted into some places, such 
as R-rated movies, and the places we 
are able to get into, we can't afford 
anyway. 

Getting money to do things isn't 
much easier. Even if your parents do 
allow you to get a job, the possibilities 



of finding one are minimal. The 
chance of finding one that you really 
enjoy is next to impossible. 

About the only thing we are able to 
do is go to the school dances, and we 
end up being the only people there. 
The seniors are too old to attend 
them, the juniors have better things 
to do with their time, and the fresh- 
men are too scared to go. So, as 
sophomores, we join in and socialize 
with ourselves. 

Being sophomores isn't that excit- 
ing. Mot much to do and nowhere to 
go, but when we become juniors, 
watch out because we are going to 
tear up the town. 



; 



tf!» 



J 



Amy Giantris sits outside at the Harvest Days 
held at Laughing Brook in October. 



SOPHOMORES 



P«0fiPOi 




m ts m (* t j 










'.:•: 




^ Jr. : ^ 

* 4' 


< - 


J /,; 


1 4 



Joao Fernandes 
Tania Fernandez 
Adam Field 
Heather Fitt 
Keely Fitzgerald 
Eric Fletcher 



Sean Foley 
Robert Fortier 
Misty Foss 
Rejinald Freeman 
William Fridlington 
Edward Furst 



Catherine Gagnon 
Jill Gagnon 
James Galleher 
Lisa Gauthier 
Brian Gawron 
Amy Giantris 



Brian Goodhind 
Adrienne Graham 
Steven Gralenski 
Rylan Grant 
Juliet Greene 
Alicia Gutride 



Christopher Hanrahan 
Scott Hapgood 
Jennifer Harrington 
Thomas Hebert 
Alexis Heede 
Steven Hertz 



Clay Holdsworth 
Amanda Howells 
Sarah Hsiao 
Kelli Hudson 
Stephanie Hupfer 
Kurt Ingram 



April Isham 
Stacy Jacobs 
Philip King 
Samantha Kober 
Brett Koppelmann 
Mary Kotomski 



David Kozub 
Dale Kritzky 
Stacey Kurpaska 
Johanna Lacamera 
Michelle Laferriere 
Michael Landry 



Jeanette Larro 
Lisa Leccese 
Christina Lefort 
Mynde Leone 
Katherine Lewis 
Lisa Lewis 



Carrie Talbot laughs loudly 
when she is surprised by 
what she saw after entering 
her sister's room. 



WJStjL 



Denise Allard and Tara Daly enjoy a quiet lunch. 
Lunch is the only real time you have to talk with 



SOPHOMORES 







Maribeth Liberty 

Jennifer LucarelK 

Paul Lus 

Melissa Lu. 

Jennifer Lynch 

Kathleen Lynch 

Joao Magalhaes 

Krina Maharne 

Treena Makuch 

Monica Maltby 

Kerry Manning 

Jennifer Markham 

Jennifer McCarthy 

Scott McFarland 

Sarah McGahan 
Gerald McMahon 

Nanhee McMinn 

Steven Meisner 
Martin Marrero 

Darren Melcher 
Paul Mikuszewski 

Deanna Minnon 

Robin Miodowski 

Laura Moran 

Carrie Moriarty 

Kevin Moriarty 

Rachel Morton 

Vail Mosier 

Karrie Murphy 

Matthew Nelson 

Gregory Piowakowski 

William O'Connell 

Bryan Oglesby 

Robert Pafumi 

A. Luke Parker 

Rinku Patel 

Jennell Pederzani 

Brigitte Pelouze 

Marc Penso 

Nicole Pepin 

Lori Ann Perotti 

Susan Pierce 

Kelly Pincince 

Amber Quist 

Tara Reavey 

Lori Richter 

Jason Robinson 

Brendan Rohan 

Nathaniel Root 



n 

ft 



m ft 





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t ¥% < ; ft m 0TS 



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The Class of '91 officers enjoy 
themselves at a meeting afters- 
chool. Showing that they also 
like to have fun. 




SOPHOMORES 



Locker FRIEND-ZY 



I was one of the few lucky 
ones who snagged a full 
length locker in the 
girl's locker room. Howev- 
er, I do share it with two 
other people. Opening the 
locker is an experience in 
itself. The articles con- 
tained within the locker al- 
ways manage to find their 
way out when it is opened. 
In just two seconds, what 
remains in the locker is the 
few clumps of dust that 
were there in the beginning. 
Opening it isn't bad 
enough, moths have taken 
over my top shelf since one 
of the girls introduced a can 
of Paul Mitchel hairspray 
which smells like watermel- 
on. The moths seem to be 
attracted to this pleasant 
smell. The two other girls 
that I share the locker with 
are now both taking swim- 
ming, and they don't take 
their wet towels and suits 
home after every class. 
They sit in the locker and 



not only do they get moldy, 
everything else in the lock- 
er gets an unpleasant 
odor.Then we have a drug 
store on the bottom shelf, 
with all of the hair dryers, 
hairspray, shampoo, condi- 
tioner, soap, etc. (note — 
there are two of everything 
that are related to swim- 
ming) The bottled toiletries 
are usually not capped tight 
enough and every Monday, 
Wednesday, and Friday, 
there are beautiful new col- 
or spills. 

It is a rare day when 1 can 
walk into gym class without 
having a splotch of pink 
shampoo on my tee-shirt. 
My sweat pants are usually 
damp and smell of chlo- 
rine. Although the wetness 
of their suits and towels 
smelled up the locker, it did 
however, stick to the pile of 
gym clothes, so they don't 
fall out when the locker is 
opened. 

Sharing a gym locker 



does have its good quali- 
ties also. For example, if 
one of us forgets something 
to wear to class that day, 
there is bound to be an ex- 
tra one floating around in 
the locker somewhere. The 
point is, that you can never 
be unprepared for class. 
Another good aspect of 
sharing a locker is that if 
one of us is going to be late 
to class, then the others are 
responsible for shoving 
everything back in so it fits. 
Although there are some 
good points to sharing a 
locker, there are more bad 
points than good. So my 
advice to you is, if you are 
lucky enough to get a full 
length locker, keep it for 
yourself. 



J.V. cheerleader, Kristen Falzone, cheers 
her heart out for the Falcons during a home 
football game. 




1 



Rylan Grant and Steve Belden help participate in Monica Maltby volunteers for Key Club at the Harvest 
Project Adventure. The classmates watch as they Days held at Hampden's Laughing Brook, 
support another one of their friends. 



SOPHOMORES 







Brigitte Pelouze an Cathy Gagnon practice their part for 
the spring musical, South Pacific. 




f \ !■ 



Amber Quist relaxes in her homeroom. Everyone uses 
homeroom as a time to talk with friends, finish home- 
work, catch up on a few minutes of extra sleep, or just 
relax. 

Jennifer Harrington gives up her Saturday morning 
plans to help out at the Teddy Bear Picnic held on Octo- 
ber 15, 1988 at the Wilbraham Children's Museum. 



Douglas Rose 

Annette Ross 

Elizabeth Ross 

Jennifer Ross 

Heather Rothschild 

Robert Royer 

Taese Sanders 

Eric Schmitt 

Stephen Schmuck 

Ryan Scott 

Jennifer Shaw 

Daniel Skala 

Brian Smith 

Tara Smith 

Heidi Solaroli 

Susan Solzak 

Leah Soule 

Russell St. Pierce 

Ben Stone 

Martin Stone 

Carl Streeter 

Amy Stuart 

Ellen Sullivan 

James Sullivan 

Kay-Kay Sutton 

Lynn Szczebak 

Carrie Talbot 

Sara Taylor 

Charles Theocles 

Lisa Tienken 

Lori Toman 

Terence Tousignant 

Calli Tranghese 

James Troy 

Daniel Truesdale 

Frances Truitt 

Jill Turcotte 

Mary Viedeman 

Kimberly Venne 

Heather Wages 

Mary Wallace 

Matthew Wallace 

Thomas Walling 

David Ware 

Courtney Ware 

Michelle Watts 

Kara Welch 

Meal Whitfield 

Erica Whittle 

Jennifer Young 

Pamela Zajac 




j$l fa 




SOPHOMORES 















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Heather Wages shows off the child inside of 
her by dressing up as Alice in Wonderland on 
Halloween 




I hate not being able to drive 



44 



i 



hate having to hitch a ride. 
It's terrible! Hopefully I'll 
have my license by the 
middle of the summer so I won't 
have to worry about it next year. " 
— Mary Wallace 



44 



B 



ummin ' rides is really no 
big deal. I don 't mind it!" 
— Jenn Lynch 



44 



c 



onstantly having to hitch 
a ride to go anywhere is 
a pain! I can 't stand it. " 
Rylan Grant 



44 



I 



t's hard for me because I 
won 't be getting my license 
for awhile, but I have alot 
of senior friends who ha ve cars so it 
doesn't really bother me. " — Kris- 
ten Falzone 



44 



i 



f makes me feel like a 
moocher - always having to 
bum a ride." 

— Robbie Fortier 



44 



i 



a lift 
where. 



t doesn't bother me in the 
least, because my parents 
are always there, to give me 
when I want to go some- 
— Monica Maltby 



SOPHOMORES 



Jason Adamson 
Douglas Albee 
Susan A Ives 
Cory Anderson 
Lisa Anderson 
Michele Asselin 
Angela Babineau 

Philip Balmer 

Rachel Bannon 

Bridget Baron 

Mary Batista 

Rebecca Beacom 

Kandra Belcher 

Spence Bienvenue 

Frank Blanchard 

Heather Bleau 

riicole Bluteau 

Eric Boduch 

riicole Boissonnault 

Carrie Boudreau 

Douglas Bower 

Cynthia Brescia 

Catherine Bresette 

Jennifer Breton 

Robert Bruton 

Todd Burger 

Beverly Burke 

Amy Cahill 

Robin Callahan 

Jason Carter 

John Casagrande 

Brendan Cavanaugh 

Kris ten Cavros 

Michael Champigny 

Pamela Chase 

Steve Chechette 

Bryan Christofori 

Giovanni Cirillo 

Andrew Clines 

heather Colclough 

Jason Constantine 

Marie Courtney 

Shawn Cole 

Stacy Currier 

Edward D'Amato 

Tamara Damarjian 

Andrea David 

William Dean 

Margaret Dearden 




<#% life. 



FRESHMEN VS. THE 
UPPERCLASSMEN 



Dealing with the upperclass- 
men on the first day of 
school, for most of us, is not 
an experience that we would like to 
remember. If they weren't laughing 
at us and calling us "little fresh- 
men ", then they were giving us 
wrong directions to class and trying 
to convince us that the Butler 
Building was our homeroom. To 
top it off, they took full advantage 
of the fact that they were the oldest 



in the school, and we were the new 
crop of freshmen for them to pick 
on. 

There are some of us who are 
lucky enough to avoid the upper- 
classmen, but then there are those 
of us who have older brothers or 
sisters in the school, not only so we 
have to deal with them, we have to 
deal with their friends. Their friends 
find that we are easy targets to ha- 
rass and rank on, and they seem to 



find pleasure in doing so. However, 
there are some advantages to hav- 
ing an older sibiling in the school. If 
they are nice, then they will include 
you in their jokes, and tease you in 
a pleasant way. Dealing with the 
upperclassmen is one of the down- 
sides to being a freshman, but just 
think, in three years we will be the 
upperclassmen, and we will be 
waiting for the new group of fresh- 
men to enter Minnechaug. 










Dana Decesare 
Sherry Decoteau 
Mark Degray 
Laurie Delisle 
Anthony Desjardins 
Trista Desousa 



Paul Devries 
holly Dill 
Diana Dolan 
Sandra Donnelly 
Peter Dowd 
Kerri Dowling 



James Dubord 
Amanda Ducharme 
Matthew Dugan 
Alexander Durzy 
Lori Estrada 
Charles Farrah 



Jennifer Ferrindino 
Leslie Ferris 
Tina Fiore 
Andrew Forcier 
Kimberly Forrant 
Dorian Frackelton 



David Frantzen 
trie Frederick 
Jerome Gagliarducci 
Mara Gaudette 
Allison Geldart 
Rebecca Gibb 



Lynn Gil 
Matthew Glover 
Charice Goodrich 
Shawn Gralinski 
Karen Granaudo 
Laura Graveline 



Derek Gray 
Jennifer Grono 
Eric hall 

Brendan halloran 
Bonnie hanson 
Edward Harris 



J.V. cheerleader, Kim Tor- 
rant, cheers on the Fresh- 
man Falcon Football team 
at a home game one cold 
afternoon in October. 





Before school started. Amy 
Kraus and Kerri Dowling 
watch television and look at 
pictures to take their minds 
off of returning to school. 

Helping out the Key Club at 
the Peach Festival, Mike 
Jackson and Stephanie Pie- 
tryka sell raffle tickets to 
the crowd as they enter the 
grounds. 







Christopher Hebert 

Seth Medlund 

Jennifer Herbert 

Frederick hill 

Clifford Holt 



Kimberly Ingram 

Catherine Jablonski 

Michael Jackson 

Amy Jenkinson 

Eric Joyal 



Jonathan Kapner 

Jody Hasten 

John Kennedy 

Jonathan Kerbel 

Jonathan Kibbe 



Eun-Ah Kim 

Amy Kraus 

Mark Kulis 

Robert Langdon 

Jeffrey Lavoie 



Allan Leger 

Elizabeth Leritz 

Jason Lewenczuk 

Amy Liese 

Jennifer Little 



Alexis Loper 

Keith Lopez 

Christopher 

Lucarelle 

Christopher Lynch 

Christine Mahoney 



Charity Manegre 
Clarence Martin 
Sara Marveso 
Gregory Mascaro 
Michael Mascaro 



Louis McCray 

Michael McCurry 

Erin McDonald 

George McDonald 

Casey Mellen 



Jason Menard 

Lisa Merigian 

Jody Michalski 

Jeffrey Moore 

Richard Moriarty 



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Ryan Trombly helps out the JCL 
at the thirteenth annual catapult 
contest held at Minnechaug this 
fall. 





Enjoying themselves at the Peach Festival, 
a group of freshmen boys get their first 
glimpse of high school life. 

Amy Jenkinson practices her routine on the 
beam before a home gymnastics meet. 



Being a Freshman in 
Sports 



Being a freshman in 
sports definitely has 
its ups and downs. 
From the first day of tryouts 
until that last game or 
meet, the freshmen are 
looked down upon by the 
"more experienced" upper- 
classmen. Regretfully, we 
must learn the rules and 
regulations and the tricks of 
the trade. For some of us, 
we might learn these the 
hard way; and our learning 
experiences may be embar- 
assing and sometimes, very 
painful. We have to deal 
with the ridicule that we re- 
ceive from the upperclass- 



men who think that they 
can tell us how to do things 
properly, just because they 
have been down this road 
before. For some it may get 
frustrating, and cause us to 
quit, but then there are 
those of us who stick it out 
and actually make the 
team. 

Once we make the team, 
we might have to deal with 
the fact that we might never 
get the chance to play or 
compete in a game or meet. 
We did not try out for the 
team just so we could sit on 
the bench the entire game. 
Anxiously, we sit on the 



bench and wait for our turn 
to participate. We watch as 
the upperclassmen defend 
our school's reputation and 
pride, and hope that we will 
be out there oneday. 

Every freshman that has 
participated in a sports pro- 
gram at Minnechaug has 
not been disappointed in 
the risks that they took, and 
the outcome of those risks, 
now we can sit on the 
benches and await the fol- 
lowing year when it will be 
our turn to play in the game 
while the new freshmen can 
sit back and watch us. 




Staying after school to help with the year- 
book, Bethany Sager takes a break from 
writing captions. 



FRESHMEN 



& 



FROM THE TOP 
TO THE BOTTOM 



Last year we reached 
the point in our lives 
where we were the 
kings and queens of the 
school. Putting down the 
sixth graders had never 
seemed to be as much fun 
as it was then. Going from 
eighth grade to being a 
freshman was a step up. If 
this was true, then why did 
it seem like a step down? 

After being in the Middle 
School for three years, we 
knew everything about the 
school. In Minnechaug, 
everything was new to us. 
We were all afraid of getting 
lost and we were afraid of 
the upperclassmen. We 
were hoping that the 
friends that we would be 
making from the other 
towns would help us adjust 
to the changes that we 
would be going through. 

When people were asked, 
"Do you notice a change 



from being the oldest in the 
Middle School to the youn- 
gest in Minnechaug?", 
these were some of the an- 
swers . . . 

"Yes, last year all the 
same people were in all of 
my classes. This year 1 have 
only about 4 people from 
Hampden in my classes. It 
also seems that people 
aren't as close as they were 
last year." — Tony Trangh- 
ese 

"I think that High School 
is more fun than the Middle 
School." — Dean Ro- 
senthol 

"In Minnechaug, all of the 
upperclassmen think of you, 
as a stupid freshman, while 
last year that is how we felt 
about the sixth graders. — 
Betsy Leritz 

As freshman, we can look 
forward to three more chal- 
lenging years of academics, 
sports, and clubs. 





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Mr. Musselman's freshmen Eng- 
lish class prepares for the clay's 
lesson, by taking out their vo- 
cabulary books. 

Carrie Boudreau, Nicole Bluteau, 
Kim Wyzik, and Kara Perkins 
cheer on the Falcons at a home 
soccer game. 



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FRESHMEN 




John Mumper 

Jessamy Murray 

Theresa Myette 

Lauren Nakashian 

Megan Micoli 

John noble 

Renee riooney 

Thaddeus riowak 

Kealy O'Brien 

Sheila O'Donnell 

Robert Orieil 

Chandra Ober 

Rebecca Orr 

Wendy Osman 

Tracy Pafumi 

Dineen Parker 

Matthew Penso 

Kara Perkins 

Jill Perman 

Bryson Perri 

Stephanie Pietryka 

Aaron Pilarcik 

Wendy Poole 

Alan Poremba 

Robert Pridemore 

Kellie Raczka 

Lisa Raschilla 

Sanjiv Reejhsinghani 

Caetano Rodamilans 

Peter Rodgers 

Stephanie Rqj 

Carlo Romeo 

Dean Rosenthal 

Amy Ross 

Kara Ruscio 

Bethany Sager 

Anita Salomone 

Charles Savoie 

Christina Scagliarini 

Matthew Scarlett 

Joseph Shanahan 

Jodi Shepard 

Dana Shults 

Todd Shumate 

Laurie Snook 

Craig Soukup 

Craig Stitsinger 

Shauna Sutton 

William Szafarowicz 

Tammy Teece 

Elizabeth Tencza 

Stephanie Thiffault 

Robert Thorpe 

Scott Topor 

Anthony Tranghese 

Rita Trolio 

Jana Tromblay 

Ryan Trombly 

Jennifer Turgeon 

Jennifer Tyler 

William Veideman 

Stacey Verville 

Henry Wawrzonek 

Kenneth Wegiel 

Jennifer Whiting 

Heather Wholley 

Lauren Willoughby 

Joseph Wilson 

Erica Wolfe 

Kimberly Wyzik 

Jeffrey Young 

Leah Zadrozny 

Karen Zahr 

Amanda Zepke 

Michelle Zhe 

Kristel Zimmerman 

Stephanie Ziobro 

Jessica Zollner 

Renee Gibson 

Jason Menard 

Stephanie Thiffeault 




Leah Zadrozny 
and Amy Kraus 
enjoy the weather 
while waiting for 
their late buses 
on a warm 
October 
afternoon. 





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J.V. Cheerleader, Lori Estrada, cheers on the falcons 
at a home football game to an empty set of bleach- 
ers. 





Becky Beacom 
and Ally Loper 
head for the food 
tents for a snack 
at the Peach 
Festival in 
September. 



$ 



Miss Kristine Alquist: Reading and Study Skills, FSAT/SAT. 

Mrs. Donna Alberici O'Connor: Contemporary Problems, PSAT/ 

SAT; English Chairman; Emeralds Advisor. 

Mrs. Marilyn Ats: Latin 1,2,3,4; History of Civilization; JCL 

Advisor; Class of 1990 Advisor. 

Mr. Jerry Badger: Acting Principal 

Mr. Daniel Balser: Power Mechanics 1,2; IA 1; ACV Girl's Soccer/ 

Softball (JV). 



Mr. Donald Bamford: H Algebra 2, Basic Algebra 2, Math 10; 

Chariman Math Department, Math Prep SAT. 

Mrs. Lois Barber: Superintendent's Office. 

Mr. Martin Barrett: Physical Education; HCV Cross Country. 

Mr. David Barry: I. Social Studies, U.S. History, History Chairman; 

VGolf; Metco Coordinator. 

Mrs. Teresa Barton: Algebra 2, Geometry, Math Analysis, Pre 

Algebra, Basic Algebra . 

Mr. Charles Beeler: Music Theory, Concert Band, H Wind 

Ensemble, Music Chairman, Advisor, Pop and Concert Band. 

Dr. David Bennett: Physical Education, Health, HCV Girl's 

Basketball, Track, Driver Education. 

Mrs. Linda Bennett: LPVEC 

Mr. David Bernstein: Rhetoric of Film, Writing Lab, English 2. 

Ms. Connie Bienvenue: LPVEC 



Mrs. Judith Borsari: Guidance Counselor 

Miss Mary Lou Brewer: H U.S. History, Mew England Life, H. 

Senior Seminar; Advisor Model Congress and Model UN. 

Mrs. Cynthia Brown: Career Center Coordinator. 

Dr. Richard Brown: H. Chemistry, Chemistry, Science Department 

Chairman. 
Miss Patricia Cascio: Physical Education. 



Mr. Stephen Castonguay: History of Civilization, I Social Studies, 

Psychology. 

Mrs. Janice Cormier: Therapeutic Speech Education. 

Ms. JoAnn DalMolin: Pre Algebra, Algebra I, H. Algebra 2, 

Geometry, Algebra 11. 

Mrs. Christine Danker: Special Educator 

Ms. Diane Danthony: Popular Short Story, English 1, 

Communication Training. 




'90 Evaluation 



Minnechaug Regional 
High School's faculty 
met on November 28 to 
listen to tips on prepar- 
ing for the school's Self- 
study offered by a staff 
member from the New 
England Association of 
Schools and Colleges. 
The Association's Com- 
mission on Public Secon- 
dary Schools works with 
the schools to "improve 
the quality of education 
through the continuous 
process of evaluation.'' 

The self study provides 
an opportunity for the 
Minnechaug faculty to re- 
view educational pro- 
grams and to determine 
the degree to which our 
school meets the ac- 
creditation standards. 
The commissions stan- 



dards of accreditation in- 
volve evaluation proce- 
dures that assist in iden- 
tifying how effective edu- 
cation meets the needs 
of its students. The entire 
faculty participates in the 
evaluation process by 
serving on subcommit- 
tees or chairing a commi- 
tee. The various com- 
mittees of the Standards 
of Accreditation include: 
Curriculum, Community 
Support and Involve- 
ment, Educational Media 
Services, Administration, 
Faculty and Staff, Pupil 
Performance and Educa- 
tion Results, Guidance 
Services, Students Activi- 
ties. The co-chairs of the 
committee are Karl 
Sternberg and Susan 
Kline 




Girl's track coach, Hal Miller gives 
high-jumper Kiki Yamer a pep talk 
just before she competes. 



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Mr. John Deely: Business Math, Career Exp., Typing 1, 

Accountingl; HCV Girls' Soccer; HCV Ski Team. 

Mrs. Johanna Desautelle: Secretary, Library. 

Mrs. Elizabeth DeSimone: History of Civilization. 

Mr. Paul Deslauriers: Special Education. 

Mr. James DeWolf: Graphic Arts 1,2,3; Tech Drawing 2,3,4. 



Ms. Patricia Donnelly: Tutor, Special Education. 

Mrs. Patricia Donovan: LPVEC 

Miss Marie Driscoll: Director of Guidance. 

Mr. Raymond Drury: Concert Choir, Treble Choir, fl. Madrigals, 

Music History, Chamber Choir. 

Mrs. Peggy Durzy: LPVEC 



Miss Margaret fey: Spanish 1,4,5; Chairman foreign Language. 

Mrs. Susan Fitts: Geometry L2, Trigonometry, Basic Algebra 2, 

Math 10. 

Mrs. Joanne Forcier: Secretary, Attendance. 

Mrs. Joanne Fornier: Secretary, Guidance. 

Mr. Peter Gartner: Director, Special Education. 



Mr. James Girotti: Physical Education, Chairman P.E. 

Mrs. Patricia Gordon: General Science, Earth Science. 

Mr. Victor Granaudo: Geometry LI, H Math Analysis, Algebra 

11,12, Math Analysis, Mathletes Advisor. 

Mrs. Joan Guziec: Word Processign, Typing 2, Applied 

Economics/Business Law, Shorthand, Personal Typing. 

Mr. J. Brian Halloran: Superintendent of Schools. 



Mr. Daniel Hanscom: U.S. History, Our World Our Times, News/ 

Views. 

Mr. James Haynes: Metal 1,2; Industrial Arts, Small Building 

Construction, Wood 2. 

Dr. Diane Heiney: English 2, Speech Communications. 

Ms. Donna Hick: Tutor, Special Education, Advisor, Student 

Host/Hostess 

Mr. Ronald Hofmann: English 1,4; Contemporary Problems. 




Soccer coach John Deely, talks to 
his team before the game begins. 
These talks are what get the girls 
motivated. 



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Mr. Russell Holt: Consumer Math, AF Calculus, Geometry LI, 

Algebra 12, Trigonometry. 

Mrs. Diane Jeserki: Typing 1, Word Processing, Personal Typing, 

Accounting 1. 

Mr. Robert Johnson: Principal. 

Mr. Marios Kacoyannakis: Guidance Counselor. 

Mr. Bruce Kenney: Physics, H. Physics. 

Mr. Martin Kibbe: Dig. Electronics, Electronics 1,2; Industrial Arts, 

Advisor Class of '92, HCV Hockey. 

Ms. Terri Kida: LPVEC 

Mrs. Jan King: Special Education 

Ms. Chris Kirchgessner: Secretary, Special Education 

Mr. Robert Kirschling: Guidance Counselor. 

Mrs. Susan Kline: NEASC Evaluation, Co-chair, English 2, AP 

English 3. 

Mr. William Kober: Driver Education, Athletic Director. 

Mrs. Gloria LaElamme: Spanish 2,3; French 1,2. 

Mr. Alex Lagunowich: Biology, H Biology. 

Mrs. Carol Lambert: LPVEC 

Miss Raffelena Latino: AP English 4, American Idealism, English 

1. 

Mrs. Carol Ligarski: H. Computers 2,3; Chairman Computers. 

Mrs. MaryAnne Little: Switchboard Operator/Recptionist. 

Mr. John Logan: Assistant Principal. 

Ms. Beverley Macaulay: Superintendent's Office. 


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Dedicated 
Service 



On October 24, 1988 
twenty-one faculty mem- 
bers were recognized by 
the national Education 
Association for twenty- 
five years of dedicated 
service to the education 
profession. Mr. Gary Pet- 
zold and Mr. Daniel Hans- 
corn presented the na- 
tional Education Associ- 
ation Pins to: Mrs. Mari- 
lyn Ats, Mr. Jerry Badger, 
Mr. David Barry, Mr. Don- 
ald Bamford, Dr Richard 



Brown, Mr. Paul Deslaur- 
iers, Mr. James DeWolf, 
Ms. Marie Driscoll, Miss 
Margaret Fey, Mr. Peter 
Gartner, Mr. Ronald Hof 
mann, Mr. Marios Ko 
coynnakis, Mr. William 
Kober, Mr. Henry Man 
egre, Mr. Robert McCar 
thy, Mr. Harold Miller, 
Miss Barbara Prakneck 
Mr. Richard Spencer, Mr, 
Karl Stenberg, Mr. Louis 
Verani, and Miss Helen 
Walinski. 



Teachers who were recognized by 
the national Education Associ- 
ation accept their pins that were 
presented to them on Oct. 24. 




The teachers that received awards 
all join together to pose for a pic- 
ture. 

Mrs. Barton looks happy as she 
prepares her lesson for her next 
class. 



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Mrs. Catherine Maleckas: Secretarial Assistant 

Mr. Henry Manegre: Industrial Arts, Tech Drawing 

Chairman Industrial Technology. 

Ms. Mary Mariani: Superintendent's Office. 

Ms. Elizabeth Martin: LFVEC 

Mr. Robert McCarthy: French 2, 3, 4, 5. 



Ms. Corrinne Mercier: Superintendent's Office. 

Mr. Harold Miller: General Physiology/Anatomy; General Science 

2, Human Physiology. HCV Girls Cross Country. HCV Girl's 

Track. 

Mr. Russell Mooney: IIP Counselor. 

Mr. John Morrisey: Tutor Special Education 

Mr. Bryon Musselman: Engish 1,3; Advisor "As Schools Match 

Wits". 

Ms. Martha Niziolek: Secretary, Athletic Director 

Mrs. Paula Noonan: LPVEC 

Ms. Nancy NorCross: Superintendent's Office 

Mrs. Rosemary Notarangelo: Child Study 1,2,3; Life Ed/Child 

Growth; Nursery School. 

Mr. Thomas Orszulak: Psychologist 



Mrs. Patricia Osmond: Librarian, Advisor, International Club. 

Mr. Gary Petzold: Intermediate Biology, General Science 1, Earth 

Science, Advisor Class of '91. 

Mrs. Patricia Polchlopek: Physical Education 

Mrs. Kit Polga: Career Center Coordinator 

Mrs. Nancy Porter: Secretary, Assistant Principal. 



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Mr. Castonguay and Maria get 
into the spirit of the lesson by 
dressing up as Indians. 



Miss Barbara Prackneck: English 2, Survey of American 

Literature. 

Mr. John Przybylowicz: Spanish 1,2,3. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Radwilowicz: Chemistry. 








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Mrs. Joan Reel: Secretary to the Superintendent 

Mrs. Margaret Robinson: Art 1,2,3,4. 

Dr. Joyce Sager: Spanish 2,3,4. Advisor Class of '89, Yearbook, 

Business and Editorial. 


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Mrs. Sandra Sanders: Secretary, Assistant Principal. 

Mrs. Jeanne Sauve: Director, Computer Services. 

i Mr. Stephen Scharl: AV/Media Specialist. 


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Mrs. Heidi Schwendenmann: Physical Education, Advisor, Key 

Club. 

Mrs. Luella Searles: Bookkeeper. 

Mr. Francis Sersanti: English 1, Survey of American Literature, 

Advisor, Chess Team. 






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Mrs. Constance Shea: Geography Studies, Modern World History, 

Promise of America. 

Mrs. Florence Sheehan: Special Educator. 

Mrs. Carol Sibilia: Secretary, Principal. 


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School Leadership Project 



During the 1988-1989 
school year, the faculty 
and the students of Min- 
nechaug Regional High 
School came together to 
discuss some 'social 
problems'' at the school. 
Ms. Anne-Marie Zan- 
fanga, Ms. Diane Danth- 
ony, Mrs. Christine 
Danker, Mr. Russell Moo- 
ney, Mr. Marios Kacoyan- 
nakis, Mr. John Logan, 
Mrs. Joan Quziec, Mr. 
Stephen Castonguay, 
Mrs.Janice Cormier, and 
Mrs. Patricia Osmond 
talk with students, Lisa 
Deblois, Lynn Maloney, 



Amy Greene, Jennifer 
Dickinson, Bree Focier, 
Jason Bruno, Amy Gian- 
tris, Sheila Moriarty, 
Anne Courtney, Dirk 
Clarke, and Alexis Meede 
about the ongoing prob- 
lems at Minnechaug. 
These dedicated faculty 
memebers worked with 
students to create a 
friendlier atmosphere at 
the school. The project 
received a grant from the 
Commonwealth of Mas- 
sachusetts and hired a 
private consultant, Diane 
Goodman, who worked 
with the group. 







Coach Bennett watches the boys 
track team practice before a home 
meet. 



' '/ ■'■'!.!. 




Mr. Robert Silva: Algebra 11, Algebra 1, 2, Math 10, Geometry 

LI. 

Mrs. Barbara Sirois; Computer Programming, AP Calculus, 

Algebra 12, Geometry L2. 

Mrs. Marylou Sitnik: Pood Tech, Chairman Home Ec, Advisor 

NHS. 

Mrs. Rita Southworth: Library Aide, English Secretary. 



Mr. Richard Spencer: English 1, Advanced Writing, PAVAS 

Advisor. 

Mr. Karl Sternberg: NEASC Co-Chairman, Intermediate Chemistry. 

Mr. Arthur Tipaldi: American Idealism. Speech and 

Communication, HCV Soccer and HCV Softball. 

Mr. Michael Trebbe: Business Manager. 



Mr. Gregory Trimmer: Advanced Writing, Man and His 

Environment, English 2, JV Baseball. 

Mr. Louis Verani: Accounting 1,2, Applied Economics/Business 

Law, Word Processing, Chairman Business Department. 

Mrs. Sonya Vickers: General Science, Biology. 

Miss Helen Walinski: Assistant Principal. 



Mr. Andrew Whalen: Administrative Assistant, Physical Education, 

first Aid, HCV Baseball. 

Mrs. Constance White: Tutor, Special Education. 

Mr. Curt Wing: I.E. Science, H. Earth Science, Intermediate 

Physics. 

Mrs. Jeanne Wolford: Nurse. 



Mr. John Worthley: Algebra 11, 12, 1, Math Analysis, Basic 

Trigonometry. 

Miss Christine Wrona: Promise of America, U.S. History. 

Mrs. Sandra Zahr: Secretary, Guidance. 

Ms. Ann Marie Zanfagna: IIP Counselor. 




Mr. Pryz flips through his plan Coach Greg Trimmer gives his 
book to create the days lesson. boys a pep talk before the big 
baseball game. 




Colleen Wilson carves a pumpkin 
to get ready for Halloween. 



Learning how to cook from Mrs. 
Danio is exciting to Maria Fer- 
reira. 



fr 




Trying as hard as he can Eric 
Methe learns from Mrs. Carol Lam- 
bert. 



he Lower Pioneer Valley Edu- 
cational Collaborative ad- 
ministers classes for stu- 
dents with special needs in addi- 
tion to providing vocational train- 
ing programs. Minnechaug hosts 
three classes. The students range 
from those with severe handicap- 
ping conditions to some who work 
half days in the community and 
come to Minnechaug Regional to 
complete their academic work. Our 
students graduate with diplomas 
from their hometown, commemo- 
rating their individual achieve- 
ments, but greatly benefit from the 
sense of integration and respect 
they have enjoyed at Minnechaug. 








aster Said 
than Done 



Honors Calculus, Advanced Biology, Spanish 5, no problem! That's 
what most people say before tackling a schedule like that; but once 
the classes get started and the workload increases, we all realize the 
mistake we've made. A schedule like that not only takes up all of our spare 
time, but it's also much easier said than done. 

Year after year we tell ourselves that the following year we'll slow things 
down, but do we ever listen to ourselves? Of course not! We always seem to 
be more wighted down by books as the years go on. However, there are a 
few smart people who know when to call it quits. Each year they slow their 
schedule down to a limit they know they can handle. Do they know some- 
thing we don't? Probably. They're the ones that are always telling us how 
much we are pressuring ourselves and how tired we will be if we don't take 
a break. Until colleges don't judge students for the depth of their course of 
studies, SOMETHINGS WILL NEVER CHANGE. 



Mate Scott works hard to complete his 
English assignment while Christine Mar- 
tin catches up on her homework during 
their free block. 



ACADEMICS DIVIDER 




ACADEMICS DIVIDER 



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Creativity at 
Work 

C-3 looks like any other room from the outside, but on the inside of the 
door lies another world. The World of Art. From Art 1 to independent 
study, the students are able to sketch, paint, sculpt, but most important- 
ly, create. Talents are discovered and then developed. Trips to Boston's Muse- 
um of Fine Arts and to new York's Metropolitan Museum are taken to help 
widen our appreciation of the art world. Mrs. Robinson and Mrs. Stuart, the art 
teachers this year, are carrying on where Mrs. Gross left off; inspiring students 
to create and explore the infinite possibilities of art. Minnechaug also has an 
Art Club. The colorful birthday banners are the main fundraiser for the group. 
Also a tag sale held in December helped to bring in money to pay for the trips. 
Most of the time, individuals are working on their own projects, but every 
Thursday, is group work. We all gather around the stand in the middle of the 
room, and work on the same project. Whether it be drawing two trashcans or a 
still-life, or working on drawing the human body, these group projects teach us 
how not everyone interprets things the same way. 

not everyone in art is an artist, all one needs to join art is an appreciation for 
it. From Bill Klepfer's drawings, Tina Farrah's life-like sculptures, Amy Rice's 
prints, Sharon Leung's portraits, to Earl Scholfield's pen and ink drawings, art 
proves that there are many possibilities, people, and talents behind the doors 
of C-3. 



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Ko Shimizu displays his artistic talents in Mrs. 
Robinson's D-block class on his latest creative 
endeavor, which was an abstract painting of an 
apple still-life. 



Taking time out from doing their work. Bill 
Klepfer hammers Earl Scholfield into a cre- 
ative state of mind during their Art 3 class. 



Kim Boucher looks for the materials 
that she needs to finish her art pro- 
ject; which was hand outlines con- 
nected in a sculpture form. 






Danielle Couture concentrates on the 
fine details of her painting, an im- 
pressionist painting of a shell. 



Taking time out from her work. Amy 
Rice works on a Welcome Home ban- 
ner ordered through the Art Club. 



Brendan Rohan works with 
immense skill and concen- 
tration on his Industrial 
Technology project. 



John Kaschi is careful not 
to catch his fingers in the 
machine as he cuts his 
board to just the right size. 





The Other Side of 
the Arts 

Over the past few years, the immense decrease of our school population has caused 
many sad faces for both faculty and students when the school board decided to lay 
off teachers and retract courses. Well, to execute this dismal act, the school board 
chose the Industrial Technology department. Last year. Mr. Matroni and Mr. Mathew Kibbe 
were the first two teachers to be released since they were the junior members of the staff; 
which now leave only five teachers in the department, Mr. Dewolf, Mr. Manegre, Mr. Marty 
Kibbe, Mr. Haynes, and Mr. Balser. 

The reduction in faculty would mean that other members of the staff would have less 
options of teaching particular courses they like. They would have both consolidate and 
drop some of the classes in order to cover the classes that the previous teachers had left 
behind. Likewise, because of less faculty, less courses were offered. This year, Graphic Art 
3 and Design Layout, which are advanced programs were dropped because no teachers 
were available. In addition, many courses became singletons, meaning that they were 
offered during only one particular block. This limits the course availability, and means less 
chance of fitting into the schedule; thus less students will end up taking the course. 

However, there is actually a bright side to all these problems. Students who are now 
taking the Industrial Technology courses get bountiful attention from their teachers, since 
each class has fewer kids. The Industrial Technology Department still offers a variety of 
courses which is intriguing and enjoyable for any students that have the propensity toward 
that particular field. The new computer in Mr. Dewolf's Technical Drawing class provides 
print outs of the most detailed architectural sketches. Although our school is offering less 
courses, the ones that we already have are most of all sufficient and with the eager 
assistance of our faculty, the outgrowth of our Industrial Technology Department is certain- 
ly rewarding. 






INDUSTRIAL ARTS 




Rob Williams and Tim Muir work together on 
their Industrial Arts project. 




Jason Walbridge uses all of his concentration 
in sanding down his woodshop project. 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



^ 



Dawn Barnes and the pres- 
choolers in her child study class 
listen while the teacher tells a sto- 
ry. 




Nicki Carroll works with the pres 
choolers in her child study class. 



CHILD STUDY/FOOD TECH 




Working for the 
Future 

Many students now take child study and home economics by choice rather 
than as courses to fill their schedules. Previously when students found 
blanks in their schedule on the first day of school they frantically ran to 
Guidance only to wait in line for hours to see their counselor. Finally when they have 
been priviledged enough to get an appointment, they discover that all the courses 
they wished to take are filled, they eventually decide to take child study or home 
economics. However, now that scenario has changed. Several students have cho- 
sen to take child study because they have an adamant interest in children. These 
students gain a better understanding for children, their behavior and actions. 

The preschoolers attending the Minnechaug nursery School took several trips 
this year including a visit to the Holyoke Children's Museum, a production of 
Pinocchio' and the New England Dance Conservatory. In November, the New Eng- 
land Dance Conservatory presented the children with a dance demonstration by the 
Conservatory's repertory company. The New England Dance Theater, as they are 
called, presented several productions of ballet, jazz, and modern dance. The chil- 
dren's enthusiastic faces encouraged the dancers. At one point the children were 
able to involve themselves in the art of dance and leam a few basic steps from the 
performers. 

Home economics, as well, is a course that prepares students for college and life. 
The students not only learn about the specific aspects and recipes of cooking, but 
also survival skills. No more television dinners in the future for these students. The 
Bird Cage is a restaurant sponsored by the school in which the students are able to 
provide others with the skills that they have learned. They are taught new and 
exciting recipes while learning the importance of accurate cooking. For many this 
course is the first step to a career as a chef or restaurant manager. Many colleges 
including Cornell and Johnson and Wales look for early manifestation of a student's 
intrest in the field. Both Child Study and Home Economics provide these students 
with the basis for future careers. These courses are definite assets to the curriculum 
at Minnechaug. 

Ryan Scott shows off his gourmet skills 
for his latest cooking assignment. 




CHILD STUDY/FOOD TECH 







Greg Sherman tries to cram a week's 
worth of material and studying into 
his Friday morning A-block senior 
study. 

Keitha McDonald shares a joke with a 
classmate as she prepares for Mr. 
Hanscom's history trial. 





A Free Block — What is That? 



Study Hall — those magical words. Some of us may ask, what's 
that? But for those of us who have study halls, they can be both a 
blessing and a curse. If you have homework and can sometimes 
work in jungle-like conditions, studies are a great way to get your work 
done. However, if you're like most people, the temptation to talk is so 
great that it overcomes us. If this temptation is given into, it can 
sometimes lead to detention. Many people favor going to the library 
over staying in their study hall. Lori Gil says, 'the library is a more 
comfortable atmosphere and you have the option of talking as well as 
doing your work." 

Getting a library pass may be more trouble than it's worth. Many 
teachers are protective of their alloted library passes, and are reluctant 
to part with them. Unless you are a senior, you have to have a valid 
reason to be in the library. In fact, there is a space on the pass where 
you have to fill in your reason for attending the library. Making the 
mistake of neglecting to fill in this precious blank may lead to greater 
hassles when the pass is checked by the ever present library security, 
(i.e. teachers with a free block) There is also the possible embarass- 
ment of the newly installed airport-like book detector going off if you've 
forgotton to sign out a book. Regardless of all this, study halls are a 
welcome break from a class. 




Karianne Kraus uses the last few minutes of her art 
class, to complete the final copy of her English paper. 



STUDY HALLS 




Looking around the K-l study hall, a bored 
Stephanie Pietryka looks for something to do 
until the block comes to an end. 

Jeff O'Shaughnessy takes advantage of the li- 
brary's social atmosphere during a cancelled 
computer class. 




Nan-Hee McMinn and Tania Fernandez finish 
up some last minute homework on the bench- 
es outside of the cafeteria. 



STUDY HALLS 



& 



Jeremy Ober takes full advan- 
Mrs. Polchlopek prepares to tage of the equipment in the 
serve to Jen Jose during a weight room, which can also 
rough ping-pong match be used afterschool as well as 
during her gym period. during a gym block. 




Tim Sullivan tosses the 
ball up for a three-point- 
er as Rony Chung studies 
his technique. 



$ 



Should Gym be 
Required? 




No matter what grade you are in at Minnechaug, when it comes to gym, 
everyone has got a story to tell. Whether it was the time you beat Polch 
at ping-pong, the time you scored a three pointer when only one other 
person was looking, or the time you suffered in the weight room, gym provides 
fond, and not so fond memories for everyone. 

Being veterans of lifesaving, project adventure, and folkdancing, here are 
some stories that we'd like to share with you. This story is not about almost 
drowning in lifesaving, or falling off of the log, or having to dance with some 
guy that is six inches shorter than you. Ho! This is a story that happens every 
year — getting weighed. That day is always the same. We walk into the locker 
room prepared for 45 minutes of sometimes bizarre physical challenge, and 
then it happens — the voice rings out; "Don't bother changing today, just go 
to the nurse's office, I'll meet you there.'' Assorted groans fill the locker room 
(mostly from people who have no reason to groan). There's nothing you can 
do now, except go to the nurse's office and get it over with. 

As you stand on the scale, the students up in M-hall freeze with their beakers 
poised in mid-pour. What was that they ask. It must have been a janitor on the 
roof. A hush falls about the nurse's room and it seems as though all eyes are 
on you. The nurse gives you that look and and then a disappointing shake of 
the head as she then writes down your weight on the paper. Okay, okay, so we 
are exaggerating a little, but we just had to find a story to top the ones about 
ping-pong, the weight room, dancing, etc. 



Andy LaPierre gives his 
legs a good workout as he 
exercises with the class dur- 
ing his gym period. 




£ 




Foreign Languages: Friend or 

Foe? 



Foreign language is a two year 
requirement at Minnechaug for 
entrance to some colleges, al- 
though many students continue their 
education past the requirement. 
Some students even take more than 
one language. Of the three languages 
offered — Spanish, French, and Latin 
— Spanish has the most students en- 
rolled. Sheila Moriarty takes both Lat- 
in and Spanish 4, and when asked 
why she takes more than one lan- 
guage, she answered, "Languages 
are easy. 1 like them." However, she 
added that, "Latin really helps me 
with my English vocabulary and gram- 
mar. Being involved in JCL is alot of 
fun." 

Students who have taken both 
Spanish and French have said that 



Spanish is easier. However, Spanish 
did become a bit more difficult this 
year for some students when Mrs. 
Sager was out with a back operation 
and Mr. Przybylowicz was out after 
breaking his ankle in class. For sever- 
al weeks, the students shifted from J- 
3 study halls to Miss Fey's classes. It 
was difficult for Miss Fey to teach addi- 
tional classes for these students who 
had already fallen behind the regular 
flow of the cirriculum. However, with 
the installation of substitute teachers, 
Miss Kathy Shea and Miss Kathy Sie- 
bert, the students were able to re- 
sume their learning. 

Perhaps the motivation for taking a 
foreign language would be the oppor- 
tunity to visit a foreign country, and 
utilize the language that they have 



been learning. Last summer, French 
students had the opportunity to travel 
to France and stay with the families of 
the french students that they had 
hosted the previous year. 

Each year, the Spanish students are 
offered a trip to Spain which is very 
popular. This year twenty-one stu- 
dents went on a two week trip during 
February vacation. The Junior Classi- 
cal League has a state convention 
each year in the spring, and it is very 
popular as well. Whatever language a 
student decides to take at Minne- 
chaug, there are plenty of opportuni- 
ties to experience the culture of that 
language as well. 



TOREIGN LANGUAGE 





Cathy Gagnon takes time out from 
doing her classwork to talk to the 
person next to her about the big 
Spanish test that she has to take 
on Friday. 

Mr. McCarthy prepares his lecture 
for his next class while his French 
students work on the classwork he 
put up on the overhead projector. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE 



$ 



Noel Smith takes a break and relaxes his hand muscles 
as his chemistry teacher gives the class notes. 

Amanda Howell and Melissa Luttrell attempt to get their 
experiment finished before the end of their honors biol- 
ogy class. 




*, 







Ken Weigel does some last minute studying for his earth 
science test with a friend before the class bell rings. 




Working with the 
Sciences 




John Howell works diligently. 




Students have their thinking caps 
in place as they take a chemistry 
exam. 



Imagine, if you will, a 
classroom full of stu- 
dents. All is quiet ex- 
cept for the sound of rapidly 
moving pencils, no one 
moves, just thinks. The 
clock ticks and then you 
hear the one fatal sentence, 
"O.K. finish the problem 
that your working on." Oh 
no! Only two minutes left in 
the class, and twenty prob- 
lems left to do. No problem. 
Where are you, you may 
ask? Well, this could be ei- 
ther a science or a math 
class. Doesn't it seem to 
you that the only class 
where you can never finish 
an exam is a science or a 
math class? 

At least for some, science 
can be made interesting by 
the lab days. Whether you 



are boiling water or working 
with magnesium, there al- 
ways seems to be some- 
thing happening. CRASH! 
Jack Welch just broke an- 
other beaker. Dr. Brown's 
bellowing voice echoes as 
he gives another command 
of what not to do in a chem- 
istry class. Sounds exciting 
doesn't it? Well, it's just as 
interesting and challenging 
as a math class. Students 
have determined that both 
science and math are sig- 
nificant assets to the Minne- 
chaug cirriculum. Al- 
though, as students admit, 
they are the most difficult of 
all their courses; however, 
they are extremely impor- 
tant if you wish to continue 
your education. 







U 



)L m 



Erica Wolf and Mara Qaudette 
work steadily on their earth sci- 



Mrs. Rad. gives Mike Sargent the 
bad news about his last chemistry 



a 






MB 



Amy Green shows that listening is an im- 
portant part of communicating your feel- 
ings and thoughts. 

Kateri Collins and Kerry Ceasan live it up at 
the Senior Kick Off Dance. 




Keitha McDonald shows how she can cope 
with a boring class lecture. 



Members of the Cope class — first row: Anne Courtney 
Maribeth Liberty, Trina Makuch, Angela Babineau, Cheri 
Methe, Amy Greene, Kateri Collins, Amy Takorian. Sec- 
ond row: Jason Bruno, Lori Delisle, Conrad Heede, Mac 
Gregor Smith, Mrs. Alberico-O'Connor, Mrs. Zanfanga 
Erik Christensen, and the men from the office. 



\- *s^^b^^^ 






w . - — 



UA 



a,.v 



Communications Training 



The first thing that came to my 
mind when 1 walked into the 
Communications Training 
class was, "I'm in the same class as 
him/her?" I had my doubts at first, 
but then decided to give the class a 
try. After all, it was only one semester, 
now that I am involved in the class, I 
am so glad that I stuck with it. The 
leaders, Ann Marie Zanfanga and 
Diane Danthony, helped to create an 
atmosphere which was comfortable 
and easy-going, one in which every- 
one can speak their mind without feel- 
ing inferior to one another. 

Early in October, the class took an 
overnight trip to the Moses Boy Scout 
Reservation in Russell, MA. led by 
camp director Bob Kidd. On the bus 
trip early Saturday morning, the class 
separated into their normal group of 
friends, but when we arrived, we real- 
ized that we would have to work to- 
gether as one if we wanted to survive 
the challenges ahead. In all, the 
group participate in fifteen hours of 



sheer fun and terror, nicely put by Me- 
lissa Stratton, the first part of Satur- 
day morning involved getting to know 
one another and earning one an- 
other's trust. We were involved in low- 
balanced challenges much similar to 
those activities in Minnechug's Pro- 
ject Adventure. One of the activities 
involved a fifteen foot wall in which 
each person had to get over to the 
other side. It took communication, 
encouragement, and trust within the 
group to complete the challenge, es- 
pecially with those who felt insecure 
and uneasy. 

"It felt good inside to see other peo- 
ple accompish tasks that they were 
frightened to try." — Kateri Collins 

Throughout the afternoon the 
group became closer and the trust be- 
gan to grow. We were faced with a 
grueling forty foot platform to which 
we were to climb using a six inch wide 
wire ladder. Each person had a Swiss 
seat which was attached to a rope 
held by a group member. 



"We were all trusting each other 
with our lives." — Conrad Heede 

With a lot of hard work and encour- 
agement from all, each person made 
it through. 

The biggest challenge came the 
next day when the class was to face 
the obstacle course forty-five feet in 
the air. This course took the most in- 
ner-strength form everyone. The 
course started with a two wire bridge, 
followed by a monkey walk, the infa- 
mous log, and finally a trip down the 
two-hundred foot zip line. 

"It gave me an overwhelming feel- 
ing of exhilaration." — Cheri Methe 

It was a perfect way to end a perfect 
weekend. We all learned to have con- 
fidence in ourselves and others. 

now as 1 walk down the hall in 
school, I see each member of the 
class in a different light, not judging 
them for their appearance, but know- 
ing and liking them for who they are 
inside. 



During the Roaring twenties day in Miss 
Brewer's Senior Sem. classes, Mary Beth 
Jacobs dresses up as a character of the 
times. 

Jason Hiersche stands "trial" during Mr. 
Hanscon's B-block history trial. 



r 




■ i 

T3 



Bringing the Past into the 
Present 



Do you know what it's like being 
in the same junior year history 
class twice and not because 
you've failed? Well, it definitely isn't 
all that easy. As a history aide, you 
wouldn't think you'd have to keep up 
on current events or the topic of dis- 
cussion in class. That is definitely not 
the case. 

For one, each week I have to make 
up a current events test on what, you 
ask, well, just about whatever pops 
into my mind five minutes before it is 
supposed to be done. But the best 
part is the bonus questions with a triv- 
ia calendar to help you. You can find 
questions like 'What is the banned 



fruit in Iran?'' "Name the Marx broth- 
ers,'' and so on. The kids love you for 
it. The best, though, is "name the 9 
reindeer.'' Some kids sing the song, 
but without fail, someone always puts 
Jack. 

The most embarassing moment is 
when you've been paying attention to 
everything the teacher has been say- 
ing and she calls on you to answer a 
question. "What was T.J. known for 
saying?" You know the answer, it's on 
the tip of your tongue, but you blurt 
out, "Give me liberty or give me 
death'' and the whole class laughs, 
"Oh, that was Patrick Henry." Your 
face heats up and turns bright red. "A 



little rebellion now and then." To ex- 
cape more embarassment, you scurry 
across the hall and update the cur- 
rent events chart. 

It isn't all that bad though. The feel- 
ing of power, to know if you really 
wanted to, you could fail someone 
(you never would though). I recom- 
mend for all of you who like history, to 
consider becoming an aide. It's a lot 
more fun than wasting five periods a 
week in the library and the satisfac- 
tion you receive from helping your 
peers makes you feel so good about 
what you're doing. It's not a bad re- 
view either. 







Members of Mrs. Shea's sophomore history class, Brian Borsari, 
Dave Kozub, and Tony Beake, participate in witnessing the Charles- 
ton contest held in Miss Brewer's G-block class. 




Paula Turcotte, Shiva Davis and Chrissy Munroe Hsten intently to Mr. 
Castonguay's Sesame Street preview, which he showed to his psy- 
chology classes. 

Laurie Wyzik listens to the trial that was going on during Mr. Hans- 
corn's senior history class. 




fr 



Kelly McDonald tries to capture her 
Halloween spirit down on paper for an 
assignment for Mr. Spencer's class. 



Laurie Ellis tries not to cough and disrupt 
the lecture during her advanced writing class 
with Mr. Spencer G-block. 




^ 



Our Own Native 
Language 



When someone says English class 
— what automatically comes to 
mind? Required reading, right. Books 
from Silas Marner to Waiting for Godot 
(and everything in between) are new 
each year. Maybe "read" is too strong 
a word. Many students opt for the little 
yellow version with blackstripes (you 
know what I mean). There are several 
arguments for and against this prac- 
tice. Teachers argue that "so much is 
lost by not reading the original, you're 
cheating yourselves the true exper- 
ience . . . ," etc., etc. One student who 
wishes to remain anonymous, points 
out that "one week is not enough 
time to read a 500-plus page book, at 
least not if 1 have to understand it and 
be tested on it." Other students con- 



fess to beingjust "too lazy to be both- 
ered." This may be a sad commentary 
on the dedication of some English 
students, but there are two novels 
that everyone I spoke to read in their 
entirely — The Count of Monte Cristo 
and Shane because "the Count of 
Monte Cristo was a great story with a 
serious revenge plot" and "Shane 
was easy to understand and took fif- 
teen minutes to read." Maybe teach- 
ers should consider assigning five fif- 
teen minute revenge stories a week 
instead of Moby Dick! 

Jennifer Doyle tries unsuccessfully to get the 
copier to work in her favor. She uses the li- 
brary's resources as a good source of informa- 
tion for her English papers. 




John Qalarneau, Brian McKeon, and Mark 
Warga converse in the library while doing re- 
search for their term papers for English. 



Jodi Kasten recites a poem in front of her Eng- 
lish class. Mr. Musselman has his students 
learn poems to improve their memory. 




£ 




1 



'"-''iil- 






Rodrick Campbell (89); PET computer- 
Eric McQranahan (89), Steve Belden 
(91); Tim Sullivan (90), Rylan Grant 
(91); Mike Tarantino (89), Karianne 
Kraus (89), Julie Motyl (90); Mark Isham 
(90), Mike Ligarski (90). 






Why do you take pro- 
gramming courses? 

"I want to major in en- 
gineering or other 
technology related 
fields.'' SUE FIORE 

(89) 

"More challenge and 
to help getting accept- 
ed to colleges." WEN- 
DY BENNETT (89) 

'Computers in busi- 
ness are essential. 
VAIL MOSIER (91) 



Have programming 
courses helped you in 
other academic 
areas? 

'Yes, changes the 
method of thinking!" 
SEAN CAMPBELL (91) 

"I think it helps a per- 
son to think logically 
which helps them in 
other courses." JESSI- 
CA QIANANTONI (89) 
"To make you think 
more analytically.'' 
JIM WILK (89) 



COMPUTERS 




♦ Jfc 




Mark Haggerty 90. Andy Hersman 
(90), Troy LaDue 89; Kirsten Vin- 
son (89); Laurie Ellis (89). Linda 
Granaudo (89). 



How do you expect 
computer courses to 
help you in the future? 

'More qualified to get 
a job.'' WENDY BEN- 
NETT (89) 

'Make money." 
STEVE BELDEN (91) 

"They will develop my 
logic and problem 
solving abilities.'' 
MARK ISHAM (90) 



David Sutter (88); Rodrick Camp- 
bell (89); Hitesh Trivedi 88; Kevin 
Dahm (88); Dean Kowalski (Dean 
of the School of Business at West- 
ern New England College); and 
Advisor Mrs. Carol Ligarski. 



Linda Herbert (89), Frank Flynn 
(90), Sue Flore (89); Vail Mosier 
(91) 



Jim Wilk (89), Doug Wentworth 
(89); Sanjiv Reejsinghani (92), 
Jeff Moore (92); Judy Lussier 90 



COMPUTERS 




Have you ever realized the importance of belonging to a group? Sure, 
there are times when we enjoy being alone, but the times we will 
remember most are the ones shared with friends. Who has time to 
spare during the busy school day to relax and talk amongst peers? We find 
comfort in the weekends as times to be with friends, but during the week, 
our only escape from academics is clubs. For maybe an hour a week, we 
join together as one. 

It doesn't matter where we are: a Key Club car wash, a national Honor 
Society dance or a choral concert, all that is important is the fact that all of 
our friends are together for that one moment of time. 

For some of us being alone is more comforting than being with a large 
group of people, but for most of us, high school is the time to share with 
friends. It has always been that way, reminding us that SOMETHINGS 
NEVER CHANGE. 



Excited about her last year of high 
school, Marq Mosier enjoys herself at 
the Senior Kick-Off Dance held on Sep- 
tember 17. Seniors enjoyed sodas, 
grinders, and ice cream in the Court- 
yard, then danced in the gym. 




GROUPS DIVIDER 




GROUPS DIVIDER 



CLASS OF 1990 OFFICERS 



Secretary Lori Gil, President Bryce Whiting.Vice 
President Andy Hersman, Treasurer Nancy 
Orquiola 



CLASS OF 1991 OFFICERS 



Secretary Katie Lewis, President Dave Kozub, 
Treasurer Brian Borsari, Vice President Roger 
Brunelle 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
OFFICERS 

Jeff Dernavich, Jeff OShaughnessy, Brett 
Knowles, and Todd Dickinson 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



front Row: Amber Quist, Kara Welch, Brett 
Knowles, Todd Dickinson, Jeff O'Shaughnessy, 
Jeff Dernavich, Rob Fortier, Sue Pierce, Amy 
Greene, Allison Mullett. Second Row: Steve 
Fiedler, Tom Mango, Marq Mosier, Lisa Lewis, Jen 
Lynch, Jen Lucarelle, Sarah McGahan, Diama Cer- 
asa, Tara Daly. Third Row Michele Kennedy, Kir- 
sten Root, Bryce Whiting, Brigitte Pelouze, Katie 
Lewis, Denise Allard, Nanhee McMinn, Keely Fitz- 
gerald, Alexis Heede. Fourth Row: Roger Brun- 
elle, Dave Kozub, Cathy Gagnon, Carta Morgan, 
Noel Smith, Jack Welch, Lori Gil, Amy Sullivan. 
Fifth Row: Beth Gillen, Sara Jenkins, Michele 
Leung, Sheila Moriarty, Sue Fiedler, Lisa Kenne- 
dy, Molly Rihm, Carolee Salerno, Andy Hersman. 
Back Row: Brian Borsari, Jen Lech, Brandy Renn, 
Lisa Manning, Lynn Maloney, Amy Fitzgerald, 
Mary Beth Jacobs, Nancy Orquiola. 




]OVERMMENT 




CLASS OF 1989 OFFICERS 



Secretary Lynn Maloney, President Tonj^Mango, 
Vice President Amy fitzgerald, Tr^Ssurer Allison 
Mullett 



This is 
Dedicated to 
our School 



The last edi- 
tion of the 
1987-1988 
version of Minne- 
chaug's paper/The 
Smoke Signal," was 
not a happy one. 
Departing seniors 
wrote essays about 
the demise of the 
paper and claimed 
that the last issue of 
87-88 would be the 
last issue altogeth- 
er. 

They did not 
count, however, on 
the dedication of 
the underclassman 
staff. Within a 
month of the open- 
ing of school, the 
students met, with- 
out an advisor, 
money, or official 
school sanctioning, 
and organized what 
they could, includ- 
ing an independent 



search for an advi- 
sor. 

Soon, Mr. Trim- 
mer and Mr. Fetzold 
were urged to be 
the paper's advisor 
and business man- 
ager, respectively. 
Reports of the 
Smoke Signal's 
death were proven 
wrong as the first 
abbreviated issue 
rolled off the 
presses in Novem- 
ber. Before the ink 
was dry, the paper 
was embroiled in 
controversy, and 
things had returned 
to normal. 

Congratulations 
to the 88-89 staff, 
not only for manag- 
ing to save the 
school paper, but 
for giving the 89-90 
staff a hard act to 
follow. 



Senior Lynn Maloney 
helps to clean up the 
courtyard before we re- 
turned to school. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT SMOKE SIGNAL 



& 






Living Up 

To The 
Standards 



Mi n n e - 
chaug's 
Emerald 
Key Chapter of the 
National Honor So- 
ciety is an involved 
club composed of a 
diverse and aca- 
demically outstand- 
ing group of stu- 
dents. 

This year's activi- 
ties began with the 
October induction 
of new members. 
Richard Neal, for- 
mer Springfield 
mayor, and newly 
elected Massachu- 
setts Representative 
to the United States 
Congress, was the 
guest speaker. 

The club's other 
yearly activities in- 
cluded the annual 
Hawaiian Dance, 
where over $1,500 



were raised for the 
scholarship fund, 
and the participa- 
tion in a phone-a- 
thon for the Heart 
Association. In ad- 
dition to these 
planned events, 
members of the Na- 
tional Honor Soci- 
ety shared their aca- 
demic talents with 
other Minnechaug 
students through 
peer tutoring. 

Under the leader- 
ship of faculty advi- 
sorMary Lou Sitnik, 
President Kirsten 
Root, Vice President 
Tom Mango, Secre- 
tary Linda Herbert, 
and Treasurer Jeff 
Dernavich, the club 
enjoyed another 
successful and ful- 
filling year. 



Induction Co-Chairper- 
son Bill Jackson gives 
the recitation of the 
Pledge to the under- 
classmen inducted on 
October 19,1988. 




Brian Borsari and 
Heather Brown wait for 
their names to be called 
during the ceremony. 



NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 




' \ V 





Front Row: Mark Isham. Marianne Marchesseault, Chri 
Agnew, Jeff Dernavich. Linda Herbert. Tom Mango. Kii 
sten Root, Jenn Kennedy, Diana Pabish, Jennifer Lech 
Brandy Renn, Jennifer Dearden, Kerry McAleer. Seconi 
Row: Bill Scarlett, Karianne Kraus, Mary Beth Jacobs 
Susan Fiore, Marq Mosier. Mia Robinson, Jennife 
Doyle, Laura White, Erica Kostka, Amy Sullivan, Beck; 
Morton, Katie Dennis. Third Row: David DeSimone, Bii 
Jackson, Mike Sargeant, Jeff O'Shaughnessey, Bret 
Knowles. Greg Lefebvre, Todd Dickinson, Robert Mel 
Ion, Rob Cummings, Katie Rasca Lori Gil Ben Connell 
Fourth Row: Anju Reejinsinghani, Laurie Ellis. Marl 
Streeter. Todd Gibbs, Kevin Trombly. Rob Dionne. Eric; 
Kansinger, Noel Smith. Jack Welch, Mark Haggerty 
Dave Belcher. Back Row: Frank Gerhart Linda Gran 
audo, Sonya Rhie. Lucy Rodamilans. Becky Emerle, Kir 
sten Vinson, Mike Zhe. Frank Flynn, Bryce Whiting. Car 
olee Salerno, Andy Hersman. 
I I 







NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 






ART CLUB 



Front Row: Richard Moriarty, Tom Walling, Marq Mo- 
sier, Kateri Collins, Laura White, Sarah Demosthen- 
ous, Michelle Laferriere. Second Row: Kerry McAleer, 
Kim Roberts, Kelli Thomas, Kim Boucher, Erica Kan- 
singer, Erica Kostka, Nanhee McMinn. Back Row: Ad- 
visor Mrs. Margaret Robinson, Treena Makuch, Earl 
Schofield, Amy Rice, Kari Stolauski, Keitha Mc- 
Donald, George Poulopoulous. 



DRAMA CLUB 



Front Row: Marq Mosier, Bill Jackson, Mike Sargeant, 
Kim Hertz, Erica Kostka. Back Row: Mia Robinson, 
Bridgitte Felouze, Heather Wages, Jenn Kennedy, 
Cathy Gagnon. 



FALCON PLAYERS 



Meredith Braskie, Mia Robinson, Bill Jackson, Mike 
Sargeant, Kim Hertz, Kristen Cavaros, Bethany 
Sager. Second Row: Kiki Yamer, Lisa Lewis, Bridgitte 
Pelouze, Monica Maltby, Jennifer Kennedy, Lynne 
Maloney, Renee Gibson. Third Row: Carla Morgan, 
Alexis Heede, Heather Rothschild, Heather Wages, 
Corinn Miller, Erica Kostka, Elizabeth Tencza. Back 
Row: Marq Mosier, Earl Schofield, Lara Brady, Sarah 
McGahan, Mike Jackson, Anne Courtney, Jennifer 
Sanders. 



PAVAS 



Front Row: Marq Mosier, Cathy Gagnon, Vail Mosier, 
Keely Fitzgerald, Mike Landry, Inaki Vinaixa, Cathy 
Collier. Second Row: Advisor Mr. Richard Spencer, 
Jen Lucarelle, Jen Lynch, Anne Marie Berte, Diama 
Cerasa, Bridgitte Pelouze, Susan Pierce, Rachel Mor- 
ton, Lisa Lewis. Third Row: Tara Daly, Amber Quist, 
Kerry Manning, Amy Barber, Jen McCarthy Amy 
Giantris, Katie Lewis, Tara Reavey, Sarah Demosth- 
enous, Carla Morgan. Fourth Row: Erica Dutil, Erica 
Whittle, Ellen Sullivan, Heather Rothschild, Denise 
Allard, Mary Veideman, Kristen Falzone, Robert For- 
tier, nanhee McMinn. Fifth Row: Andrea Chechile, 
Misty Foss, Michelle Laferriere, Jen Shaw, Courtney 
Ware, Alexis Heede, Tania Fernandez. Back Row: 
Sarah McGahan, Monica Maltby, Bill Jackson, Mike 
Sargeant, John Goodrich, Anju Reejhsinghani. 



■ 






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PAVAS/DRAMA/FALCOn PLAYERS/ART CLUB 




AN EYE FOR 
THE ARTS 



The students 
in the Drama 
Club all share 
the same love of the 
dramatic arts. As 
the students in the 
club learn, a play 
should not be a pro- 
duction where ev- 
eryone works on his 
or her own separate 
part, but a collabo- 
rative effort where 
all members work 
for a well-executed 
and enjoyable 
whole. The club dir- 
ects, produces and 
performs the One- 
Act competition, 
which allows all 
members to exper- 
ience the whole art 
of the theatre. 

The One Acts, 
which were held on 
November 18th, 
were well presented 



and were fun for 
participants and 
viewers alike. Con- 
gratulations go to 
seniors Bill Jack- 
son, Kim Hertz, Jen- 
nifer Kennedy, Kiki 
Yamer, and Mia 
Robinson for their 
outstanding effort in 
directing, acting, 
and technical help 
through their high 
school years. And 
special thanks go to 
Tim McKenna, the 
advisor, and Nark 
Bevins, the stage 
manager and tech- 
nical assistant. 

Class officers this 
year were President 
Mike Sargeant, Vice 
President Bill Jack- 
son, Secretary Mer- 
edith Braskie, and 
Treasurer Mia Rob- 
inson. 



Senior Bill Klepfer waits 
anxiously for the pottery 
wheel to spin so that he 
may begin sculpting. 




Senior Sharon Leung 
takes great care in see- 
ing that her artwork 
reaches perfection. 



Senior Earl Schofield adds a 
few finishing touches to his 
painting during art class. 



PAVAS/DRAMA TALCON FLAYERS ART CLUB 1 7 : 




& 



Front Row: Mark Symanski, Damn Bilik, Eric 
McGranahan, Estella Kranenburg, Andrea Che 
chile, Kerry Manning, Jim Wilk, Amy Giantris, So 
nya Rhie, Nanhee McMinn. Second Row: Kevin 
Blomstrom, Rob Williams, Heather Rothschild 
Alexis Heede, Cathy Gagnon, Monica Maltby, Kee 
ly Fitzgerald, Juliet Greene, Lori Toman, Sara De 
mosthenous. Third Row: Chris Morissette, Brett 
Knowles, Becky McFeeters, Jennifer Dearden 
Barbara Vecchio, Tom Walling, Anne Courtney 
Jennifer Sanders, Brandy Renn. Back Row: Mario 
Rodriguez, Chris Zeo, Mike Schmidt, Jen Shaw 
Misty Foss, Michelle Laferriere, Tara Reavey 
Todd Gibbs, Mark Sheehan. 



EMERALDS STAFF 

Kim Carling, Kim Hertz, Jennifer Landberg 





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INTERNATIONAL CLUB/JCL/EMERALDS 




ALL 

AROUND 

THE WORLD 



An important 
part of The 
Junior Clas- 
sical League is link- 
ing the past to the 
present. With the 
aid of the club's 
spunky advisor, 
Mrs. Marilyn Ats, 
and Co-Presidents 
Kevin Trombly and 
Tom Mango, Vice 
President Tony Rys, 
Treasurer Jason 
Bergeron, and Sec- 
retary Todd Qibbs, 
the JCL is one of the 
most exciting clubs 
at Minnechaug. Jeff 
Demavich served as 
Publications Editor 
for the Massachu- 
setts JCL. The offi- 
cers and members 
attended the Cata- 
pult contest, where 
Chloris once again 
took first prize de- 
spite difficulties dur- 
ing its take-off, the 
State convention 
and the annual na- 
tional Convention, 
which took place in 
the summer of 
1988. 



The International 
Club welcomed 4 
exchange students, 
from Japan, Ko Shi- 
mizu,- from Spain, 
Mario Rodriguez 
and Inaki Vinaixa, 
and from The Neth- 
erlands, Estella 
Kranenburg. 

Under the exper- 
ienced leadership of 
President Sonya 
Rhie, Vice President 
Andrea Chechile, 
Secretary Kerry 
Manning, Treasurer 
Amy Qiantris, and 
Advisor Mrs. Pat Os- 
mond members vis- 
ited to new York 
City, held a toga 
dance, and visited 
Shriner's Hospital 
in Springfield. The 
exchange students 
and club members 
toured new York 
City's top attrac- 
tions. The visit to 
Shriner's Hospital 
has become an an- 
nual event in which 
students greet pa- 
tients with flowers 
and smiles. 



JUNIOR CLASSICAL LEAGUE 

Front Row: Sara Marvaso, Sharon Leung, Becky McFeeters, 
Melissa Desjardins, Michelle Leung, Tania Fernandez, 
Monica Maltby, Cathy Gagnon. Second Row: Jen Jose, Tor- 
rie Martineau, Kara Welch, Amber Quist, Tara Daly, Misty 
Foss, Laura Graveline, Amy Cahill. Third Row: Mary La- 
Pierre, Amy Jose, Heather Wages, Sheila Moriarty, Sue 
Fiedler, Eileen Blomberg, Sara Jenkins, Beth Qillen, Sarah 
Demosthenous, Tony Rys. Fourth Row: Tom Mango, Mary 
Beth Jacobs, John Galernof, Christy Talbot, Becky Morton, 
Linda Herbert, Brian McKeon, Amy Fitzgerald, Jason Ber- 
geron. Fifth Row: Jeff Dernavich, Ann Counos, Jeremy 
Licht, Brian Dolaher, Mike Tarantino. Sixth Row: Adam 
Fields, Shaun Cole, Kevin Trombly, Brett Knowles, Roger 
Brunelle, Frank Flynn, Greg Lefebvre, Jeff OShaughnessy. 
Back Row: Jack Welch, Darren Bilik, John Goodrich, Mike 
Fietryka, Todd Gibbs, lnaki Vinaixa, Mark Symanski, Chris 
Morissette. 

JUNIOR CLASSICAL LEAGUE 
OFFICERS 

Front Row: Jeff Dernavich, Tom Mango. Back Row: Kevin 
Trombly, Jason Bergeron, Todd Gibbs. 



INTERNATIONAL CLUB/JUNIOR CLASSICAL LEAGUE 



ACADEMIA 



66 



wi 



ho wrote the Red and the 
Black?" (Stendahl), 
Who pitched a perfect 
World Series game in 1956?" (Don 
Baben) "What is the Buckeye 
State?" (Ohio). 

Those questions, and more, were 
spinning through my head on the 
bus ride to the taping of "As 
Schools Match Wits." Captains Bill 
Jackson, a four-year team member, 
and Jen Samble, a junior who had 
last year performed on Cathedral's 
TV team, along with last year's al- 
ternate, Melissa Luttrell, newcomer 
Anju Reejhsinghani, alternate Shei- 
la Moriarty, and tireless advisor Ray 
Musselman, waited anxiously for 
the show to begin. Weeks of memo- 
rization had come down to 22 min- 
utes. 

We began well and held a 30 
point against Amherst by the half- 
way mark. Things began to unravel 
when Amherst, which had faced 
and defeated two competitors, took 
the lead. The key factor was prep- 
aration. We lost by only 25 points. 
In our first (and only) time as a 
team, we posted 150 points. We felt 
proud and celebrated our effort at 
Friendly's after the meet. 

Seniors Denis Qagnon, Anju 
Reejhsinghani and Sonya Rhie, 
along with newcomers Mary Wal- 
lace, Steve Belden, and Erica Dutil 
made up this year's competing 
Mathletes Team. Advisor Mr. Vic 
Qranaudo worked to build up the 
experience of his relatively young 
team. Anju Reejhsinghani com- 
mented that "practices and meets 
encourage teamwork, but you also 
get the individual satisfaction of be- 
ing able to solve many different 
kinds of problems. Practicing for 
the meets are also an excellent 
preparation for the achievements, 
SATs, and final exams in Math." 



Student Hostess Laura Moran checks out 
the oncoming crowd during the Sports 
Award Assembly last fall. 




AS SCHOOLS MATCH WITS/MATHLETES/STUDENT HOSTS AMD HOSTESSES 




MATHLETES 



Front Row: Alexis Heede, Sharon Leung, Mary Wal- 
lace, Cathy Oagnon. Back Row: Anju Reejhsinghani 
and visitor Greg Lefebvre. 



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STUDENT HOSTS AND 
HOSTESSES 



Front Row: Brandy Renn, Bree Forcier, Melissa Des- 
jardins. Second Row: Tara Reavey, Juliet Greene, 
Sue Fiedler, Amy Davidson, Cathy Maenzo, Tom 
Walling. Third Row: Alexis Heede, Amber Quist, Tara 
Daly, Torrie Martineau, Beth Gillen, Kelli Hudson, 
Sue Solzak. Back Row: Michelle Leung, Becky 
McFeeters, Barbara Vecchio, Sharon Leung, Mary La- 
Pierre, and Melissa Eisold. 



AS SCHOOLS MATCH WITS 
TEAM 



Front Row: Bill Jackson, Mark Streeter, Kevin Trom- 
bly. Back Row: Mike Zhe, Alexis Heede, Heather 
Wages, Anju Reejhsinghani. 



CHESS CLUB 

Tom Walling, Mark Wing, and Mike Lynch 



MATHLETES/STUDENT HOSTS AND HOSTESSES/AS SCHOOLS MATCH WITS/CHESS 



£ 




KEY CLUB. Front Row: Jen Riek, Tania Fernandez, Penny Griswold, Karianne 
Kraus, Bill Jackson, Linda Herbert, Mary Beth Jacobs, Alexis Heede, Monica 
Maltby, Cathy Qagnon, Tara Daly. Second Row: Chris Baer, Sue Fiore, Denise 
Vermette, Kim Eaton, Becky Emerle, Jen Sambie, Mark Sheehan, Jim Wilk. Inaki 
Vinaixa, Mario Rodriguez, Torrie Martineau. Third Row: Candy Arslanian, Kelli 
Thomas, Jen Patterson, Christy Talbot, Chrissy Froehlich, Ann Counos, Jen 
Lynch, Kara Welch, Amber Quist, Roger Brunelle, Nanhee McMinn, Michelle Lafer 
riere, Lori Toman, Cathy Collier. Fourth Row: Sue Pierce, Marianne Marches 
seault, Dena Mascaro, Carrie Talbot, Amy Giantris, Sheetal Patel, Anju Reejh 
singhani, Anne Courtney, Jen Sanders, Brandy Renn, Sarah Demosthenous, Tara 
Reavey, Mary Viedeman. Fifth Row: Lisa Manning, Kirsten Vinson, John Cham 
bers. Peter Spellios, Heather Wages, Denise Allard, Sean Campbell, Katie Ratzca 
Sue Fiedler, Eileen Blomberg, Amy Sullivan, Lisa Kennedy, Cathy Maenzo, Kristen 
Falzone, Kelly Pincince. Sixth Row: Diama Ceraza, Eric McGranahan, Mia Robin 
son, Jennifer Doyle, Kirsten Root, Jackie Bushway, Mark Streeter, Juliet Greene 
Keely Fitzgerald, Kerry Manning, Jen Lucarelle, Lynn Maloney, Michele Kennedy 
Seventh Row: Lisa Lewis, Meredith Braskie, Mike Sargeant, Jack Welch, John 
Goodrich, Conrad Heede, Mike Pietryka, Bill Scarlett, Jim Deforest, Rick Smith 
Rob Dionne. Eighth Row: Ellen Sullivan, Richard Batts, Rob Labadorf, Jeff Derna 
vich. Shaun Cole, Brett Knowles. Back Row: Kevin Trombly, Mark Symanski, Todd 
Dickinson, Jeff O'Shaughnessy, Chris Morissette, Rob Williams, Mike Tarantino, 
Jason Bergeron, Mike Zhe, Todd Gibbs, Andy LaPierre. 




Helping 
The Town 



The 1988 version of the Minnechaug 
Key Club is remembered not only for 
its size, but also for its accomplish- 
ments. The organization has grown in re- 
cent years, and this year it is 137 members 
strong. 

The officers are a dedicated group of in- 
dividuals who have given their all. Bill 
Jackson is President, Linda Herbert is Vice 
President, Nary Beth Jacobs is Treasurer, 
Karianne Kraus is Press secretary and Pen- 
ny Qriswold is Secretary. 

The club's main purpose is to serve the 
community in any way possible. Members 
dedicated hours at the Peach Festival, 
bowled to raise money for Big Brothers and 
Big Sisters, and worked at Habitat, just a 
few examples of all the things they do. Ser- 
vice activities such as these continued 
throughout the year. Carwashes, the 
dance and the talent show were also great 
fundraisers. We were also chosen as Host 
Club for convention. 

The 1988-89 Key Club could very well go 
down as being one of the finest in Minne- 
chaug's history. 



Senior Tim Kealy helps to 
paint young faces during 
Harvest Days sponsored by 
Laughing Brook. All week- 
end long, different mem- 
bers volunteered to work at 
this booth and to do any- 
thing else they were asked 
to do. 




Michelle Laferriere, a dedi- 
cated Key Club member, 
washes a car during the car 
wash held in September on 
a Saturday morning before 
a home football game. 



KEY CLUB 08] 




front Row: Amy fitzgerald, Jennifer Deardon, Becky 
Mcfeeters, Melissa Desjardins, Bree forcier, Jill Han 
son. Second Row: Kerry Manning, Keely fitzgerald 
Karianne Kraus, Monica Maltby, Jen Lucarelle 
Christy Talbot. Third Row: Tom Walling, Penny Gris 
wold, Chrissy Froehlich, Chris Agnew, Shannon Mar- 
tin, Anne Courtney, Kirsten Vinson. Back Row: Peter 
Spellios, Jeff Demavich, Jeff O'Shaughnessy, Sheila 
Moriarty, Linda Herbert. 




On a hot day in July, Lori 
Gil, Sara Taylor, and Kerry 
Cesan check into their 
dorm at Bryant College for a 
three day yearbook work- 
shop, sponsored by Jos- 
tens' Publishing Company. 
Also attending the confer- 
ence were Karianne Kraus, 
Monica Maltby, Peter Spel- 
lios and Dr. Joyce Sager. 



"his is it! 



Throughout 
the last term 
of the 87-88 
school year, several 
students entered fl- 
18 with the inten- 
tion of becoming a 
member of the 
1988-1989 year- 
book staff. Members 
of every class, from 
freshman to senior, 
pulled together to 
make a tangible 
memory. 

By the first official 
meeting in Septem- 
ber many efforts to 
make the 1989 
yearbook the best 
were already under- 
way. During the 
summer, several 
members of the 
staff attended con- 
ferences at Bryant 
College and at Am- 
herst College. They 
then sold hundreds 
of dollars in ads. 
Along with the busi- 
ness ads, yearbook 
members focused 
their attentions on 
personal ads, mak- 
ing phone calls to 



parents urging them 
to place a senior 
message. Many 
baby pictures and 
best wishes arrived 
through the mail. 
Under the exper- 
ienced direction of 
business manager 
Kirsten Vinson, the 
1989 Falcon Year- 
book "Some Things 
never Change" was 
underway. 

Although team ef- 
fort was a major fac- 
tor in the success of 
this year's year- 
book, there was 
also room for indi- 
viual style. Editors 
of all sections 
worked diligently. 
As a result, every 
section has a 
unique style. With 
the help of staff 
members, senior 
Karianne Kraus and 
sophomore Monica 
Maltby, co-editors of 
the yearbook, cre- 
ated a memory 
none of us will for- 
get. 



Co-editors, Karianne Kraus 
and Monica Maltby, worked 
three days over the Colum- 
bus Day long weekend with 
other members of the staff. 



JiH Gagnon, Melissa Lut- 
trel, Jodi Sheperd, and 
Carla Morgan warm up 
for the first timeout dur- 
ing a home football 
game. 



Band 



This year's band was one of the finest. 
Under the direction of Charles 
Beeler, the band's almost ninety stu- 
dents provided the talent and dedication to 
make the 1988-89 band what it was. The 
Minnechaug bands consist of the Concert 
Band, which is made up of mostly under- 
classmen, and the Honors Wind Ensemble, 
whose members are selected by audition. 
Although the Wind Ensemble consists of 
mostly upperclassmen, some talented 
freshmen are members also. 

The band's first performance, the Winter 
Concert, was a great start to the concert 
year. The annual Pops Dinner Concerts 
were held in April and were extremely suc- 
cessful. The band was able to raise enough 
money through participating in the maga- 
zine sale to do such things as update its 
inventory, repair instruments and pur- 
chase new music for future growth. The 
magazine drive allowed the members of 
the band to take an overnight trip to New 
York City, where they performed in Lincoln 
Center. 

The band will play one more concert, the 
one for the graduation. Through all of their 
hard work, this year's Minnechaug Bands 
made a powerful impact on the Hampden 
and Wilbraham community. The 1988-89 
band members should be playing with 
pride, for their efforts certainly paid off. 



Senior Mark Wing takes a 
breather from the rigors 
of playing in the band at 
a Saturday afternoon 
football game. 









fc^\£ 





MlfSNECHAUG BAWDS 

Front Row: Kelli Hudson, Renee Gibson, Jennifer 
Whiting, Beverly Burk, Heather Brown, Amanda 
Howells, Mary Wallace, Bob Joyal, Sanjiv Reejhsingh- 
ani. Second Row: Chris Sala, Matt nelson, Scott 
Wright, Kristen Cavros, Megan Micoli, Betsy Leritz, 
Jodi Sheperd, Mike Landry, Jim Robinson. Third 
Row: Paula Turcotte, Jenn Kennedy, Jennifer Fatter- 
son, Amy Giantris, Heather Wages, Kerry Manning, 
Andrea Chechile, Heather Rothschild, Sarah O Don- 
nell. Fourth Row: Diana Pabish, Barbara Vecchio, 
Denise Vermette, Christy Talbot, Sue Hanrahan, Sue 
Fiedler, Alexis Heede, Kelli Pincince, Jen Shaw. Rob 
Fortier, Carla Morgan. Fifth Row: Laura White, Jenni- 
fer Sanders, Anne Courtney, Pete Spellios, Todd 
Dickinson, Mike Schmidt, Jeff O Shaughnessy Bill 
Scarlett, William Thompson. Michelle Jones. Sixth 
Row: Keith Lopez, Roger Brunelle, Jay Jablohski 
Dave Garabedian, Brian Bishop, Rob Dionne. Doug 
Albee, Aaron Pilarczk. Back Row: Griff noble. Scott 
Wyman, Kevin Moriarty, Neil Whitfield, Michael Jack- 
son, Brendan Halloran, Mark Kulis. Matt Scarlett. 



Madrigal Singers Jenn Kennedy, 

Tim Kealy, John Christie, Marc 

Mariani, Todd Dickinson, Jeff 

Bennett, Kirsten Root, and 

Penny Griswold concentrate on 

giving yet another strong 

madrigal performance for the 

members of the National Honor 

Society and their families. 



A Singing 
Success 



Minnechaug 
boasts 
many of 
Western Massachu- 
setts finest singers 
including Jennifer 
Kennedy, Carolee 
Salerno, Lisa Lewis, 
Katie Lewis, Susan 
iianrahan, Kirsten 
Root, Jackie Bush 
way, Penny Gris 
wold, Shannon Mar 
tin, Jeffrey Bennett 
Michael Sargent 
Timothy Kealy, and 
John Christie 
These fine chora 
singers all particia 
pated in this year's 
Massachusetts Mu- 
sic Education Asso- 
ciation Western Dis- 
trict Festival. Caro- 
lee, Lisa, Jackie, 
Penny, Shannon, 
Jeff and Mike were 
also recommended 
for this year's All- 
State Festival. 

These students 
along with many 



others, make up the 
1988-89 Minne- 
chaug choirs. The 
Treble Choir con- 
sists of 20 freshmen 
girls. They are ac- 
companied by Jenn 
Kennedy. The Tre- 
ble Choir works on 
much of the same 
music as the Con- 
cert Choir but also 
concentrates on 
learning basic vocal 
technique. The 
Concert Choir is 
made up of 45 stu- 
dents in all classes. 
They sing larger 
choral numbers, 
showtunes and sa- 
cred music. The 
Madrigal Singers 
are the finest sing- 
ers in Minnechaug. 
Consisting of 13 
seniors and one ju- 
nior together as a 
group, they are al- 
ways impressive to 
the audience. 



Conductor Raymond W. 
Drury displays his expertise 
with the Madrigal Singers at 
the NHS induction in Octo- 
ber of 1988. 





Concert Choir and Madrigals 

Madrigals and Concert Choir combine to sing "With 
the Voice of Singing" as the grand finale during the 
Winter Concert which was held in December 1988. 
Combined, the choirs and the band were able to 
perform with great enthusiasm insuring success. 



Treble Choir 

Front Row: Rachel Bannon, Jodi Michalski, Michelle 
Zhe, Lynn Gil. Row 2: Nikki Pepin, Bethany Sager, 
Melanie Kim, Brigitte Pelouze, Becky Beacom. Back 
Row: Mr. Drury, Liz Childs, Nicole Bolek, Bonnie Han- 
son 



Concert Choir 



front Row: Brigitte Pelouze, Lisa Lewis, Diama Cer- 
asa, Ellen Sullivan, Mary Wallace, Leah Soule, Caro- 
lee Salerno, Nikki Pepin, Nicki Keller. Second Row: 
Ryan Scott, Katie Lewis, Amy Barber, Erica Whittle, 
Courtney Ware, Bree Forcier, Liz Childs, Annette 
Ross, Gretchen Hall. Third Row: John Christie, Tim 
Kealy, Jeff Bennett, Penny Griswold, Paula Turcotte, 
Corinn Miller, Joanna Lacamera. Fourth Row: Becky 
Triggs, Chris Albano, Richard Batts, Artis Falls, 
Monica Maltby, Sarah McGahan, Cathy Gagnon. Back 
Row: Jeanette Larro, Becky Takorian, Nicole Pourier, 
Gina rig, Karrie Murphy, Nicole Bolek, Pamela Zajec 



Madigal Singers 



Front Row: Todd Dickinson, Kirsten Root, Jackie 
Bushway, Lynn Maloney. Second Row: Penny Gris- 
wold, Sue Hanrahan, Mike Tarantino, Shannon Mar- 
tin, Jennifer Kennedy. Back Row: John Christie, Tim 
Kealy, Jeff Bennett, Mike Sargent. 




#J^ 



Nicest Smile 



Nicest Eyes 



Nicest Hair 



-r> t 





Most Handsome/ 
Pretty 




Funniest Laugh Funniest Laugh 



Best Figure 





Best Dressed Girl Best Dressed Boy 



CLASS COUPLE 



SENIOR SUPERLATIVES 



r 





Despair of the Faculty 



f 



Afek*L 




MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED AND PRIDE OF THE FACULTY Despair of the Faculty 




CLASS BALLOT RESULTS 



Class Einstein 



Class Einstein 




Class Clown 



Class Clown 



Best Dressed: 

Most Handsome/Prettiest 

nicest Eyes: 

nicest Hair: 

nicest Smile: 

Most Athletic: 

Class Einsteins: 

Most Artistic: 

Most Unpredictable: 

Most Likely To Succeed: 

Pride of the Faculty: 

Most Mischievous: 

Best Physique/Figure: 

Friendlest: 

Class Partiers: 

Funniest Laugh: 

Optimist: 

Pessimist: 

Best Personality: 

Cutest: 

Despair of the Faculty: 

Funniest: 

Tallest: 

Shortest: 

Class Flirts: 

Class Musicians: 

Individuals: 

CLass Clowns: 

Most Fun to Be With: 

Quietest: 

Loudest: 

Class Couple: 

Pete and Repeat: 

Three Muskateers: 

Three Muskateers: 

Laverne and Shirley: 



Rob Williams/Kim Diotalevi 

Rick Smith/Kristen Mastroianni 

Todd Dickinson/Amy Fitzgerald 

Brett Knowles/Kristen Mastroianni 

Peter Danio/Cheri Methe 

Rob Williams/Amy Fitzgerald 

Bill Jackson/Anju Reejhsinghani 

George Pouloupolos/Tina Farrah 

Eric McGranahan/Marq Mosier 

Tom Mango/Kirsten Root 

Tom Mango/Kirsten Root 

Derek Moran/Sue Stevenson 

Jim Thompson/Kristen Mastroianni 

Rob Williams/Gianna Pedace 

Jason Sares/Sue Stevenson 

Jim Thompson/Kim Eaton 

Jeff O'Shaughnessy. Gianna Pedace 

Tim Burke/Kelli Thomas 

Mike Pietryka/Allison Mullett 

Peter Danio/Gianna Pedace 

Eric Christensen/ Holly Hupfer 

Mark Szymanski/Marq Mosier 

Steven Fiedler/Becky Ross 

Fred Gore/Corinn Miller 

Chris Zeo/Lynn Maloney 

Todd Dickinson/Jennifer Kennedy 

George Pouloupolos Keitha McDonald 

Jeff Luttrell/Sue Stevenson 

Peter Danio/Lyntte Rutstein 

Kevin Blomstrorn Aimee Stone 

Jeff Bennett/Lynn Maloney 

Stephen Fiedler & Kiki Yamer 

Tim Burke and Will Thompson 

Kristen Rys/Kim Smith, Wendy Sanderson 

Chris Zeo/Mike Schmidt Chris Bennett 

Mia Bongiomi Karen Chechette 

SENIOR SUPERLATIVES 



^1 



K 




Class Optimists Class Pessimist Class Pessimist Class Individual 





Best Personality Best Personality 



Most Athletic 



li 



Most Athletic 




$ 



Class Musician 



SENIOR SUPERLATIVES 



FRIENDLIEST BOY AMD GIRL 




SHORTEST AMD TALLEST 



Three Muscateers 




PETE 



fc 



REPEAT 



e^ f^ 




Most Mischievous 



Most 
Mischievous 



Class Musician 



SENIOR SUPERLATIVES 








^ 



COMMUNITY DIVIDER 




tad 
starts 

here 



How could Minnechaug survive without the support of Wilbraham and 
Hampden? Whenever we have a fundraiser, whether it be a magazine 
drive or a fruit sale, we turn to the community to help out our causes. 
Where would the yearbook be without the community? Without the funds 
from the various stores, restaurants, and other businesses, the yearbook 
would not be able to exist. In other words, it all starts here. 

What would we do if Friendlys or Snappy's did not exist? Where would we 
hang out? What fun would the weekends be without the movie theaters, 
bowling alleys, or malls to spend our time at? Think about it! We would all 
lead pretty boring social lives if it weren't for the community to provide us 
with things to do. Although we may take it for granted, the community is an 
important part of our lives, and SOMETHINGS WILL NEVER CHANGE. 




Working hard selling raffle tickets for 
Key Club, Conrad tleede approaches the 
spectators after they witness Key Club's 
float which resembled Florida, during 
the Peach Festival Parade. 



COMMUNITY DIVIDER 



& 




A. BOILARD SONS, INC. 



LUMBER & BUILDING SUPPLIES 

476 OAK STREET 

INDIAN ORCHARD. MASSACHUSETTS 01151 




Congratulations!! You 
did it! Happiness 
always to the one who 
has always made our 
hearts smile!! 



TELEPHONE 

(413) 543-4100 




For I know the plans I 
have for you, declares the 
Lord, plans to prosper 
you and not to harm you, 
plans to give you a hope 
and a future. Jer. 29:11 
Paul & Ginny Dernavich 



VILLAGE COUNTRY 
KITCHEN 

566-8150 
522 Main St. Hampden 

Quality Home Cooked Meals 
Breakfast and Lunch Specials Daily 

Monday - Saturday 6 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. 



BOSTON ROAD ANIMAL 
HOSPITAL 



1235 BOSTON ROAD 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 01119 

TELEPHONE: 783-1203 

MICHAEL B. RIHM, D.V.M. 
DONALD R. CROUSER, D.V.M. 
JOHN E. STAMBAUGH, VMD, 

PhD. 

JOHN ROSSEEL JR., D.V.M. 

MICHELLE HAROULES D.V.M. 

DIANE R. B1EDERMAN D.V.M. 

LAUREN C. HILL D.V.M. 

VIVIAN MEYER, D.V.M. 

MELISSA S. FOODMAN, D.V.M. 

BARBARA J. GORDON, D.V.M. 




COMMUNITY 



INSTRUMENT AND 
CONTROLS INC. 

630 Silverst 
Agawam 

789 • 3840 



orf 



GIFTS = 
FINE JEWELRY 

782-9207 

BIG D. PLAZA 
Springfield 

Alex And Jackie 
Smart 



CJUk 
Of 



'90 



SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHY 




At Photography by Duval you will get a Senior Session 
like you've never seen before! 1 1 

Your Senior Portrait Is the most important photograph you'll 
ever have taken, so don't settle for anything but the bestlll 

You will be photographed by one ol the nation's top portrait 

photographers, known for her many awards and recognitions.At 

Duval's you can count on the BEST In Senior Photography. 

YOU CHOOSE... 

The Photography Session 

Indoor, Outdoor. Casual, Formal, or WACKYHI Backgrounds of a different 

color: Reds, blues, purples, pinks, yellows.. ..all the way to the Traditional. 

OR.. ..choose the WHITE ROOM with it's enchanting Victorian Window Lightl 

The MOOD is yours for the choosingll 

ONLY AT DUMP'S... 

...can you get the attention and selections you deservelll 



CALL NOW!!!! 




Distinctive 
Photography 



283-9341 



BEST WISHES 
PE FOREST ASSOCIATES 

COMMERCIAL GRAPHICS 8. PRINTING SERVICES -J^ 

2341 BOSTON ROAD • WILBRAHAM, MA 
596-2468 



Bourbeau & Hinch 
Insurance Agency, Inc. 

ADVISORS 

CONSULTANTS 

AGENTS 

BROKERS 

413-566-5584 

2 Allen Street. 

Hampden 



COMMUNITY 



msm 





n» 



12Pulaski St. Indian Orchard 



ALPHA OIL CO., INC. 



JAMS J. DIOULIVI 



FUEL OIL 

HEATING EQUIPMENT 

SERVICE & ENERGY CONSERVATION 



2440 BOSTON ROAD 
WIIBRAHAM, MA 01095 

(413)596-4583 





We always knew you 
would graduate from the 
sink someday! We are 
very proud of you. 
Love, 

Mom, Dad, 
Andrea, Nicole 




Molly Rihm Kristen Mastroianni 

SUZANNE DAHLSTROM'S 

K 

&o COMPANY 




PROFESSIONAL MODELING t FINISHING SCHOOL 




the 



MINNECHAU6 EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 

s4*tct 70u6e& *76em (2o*tU*uced Suecea&ff 



COMMUNITY 



Whip's 
Sport About 



SPORTING GOODS 



463 BRECKWOOD BLVD. 
SPRINGFIELD, MA 01119 



iiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiziU 




And they said 
it couldn't be 

done 

Mr. & Mrs. Riek 



f phelon I 



R.E. PHELON COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

2342 BOSTON ROAD 

WILBRAMAM, MA 01095 

(413) 596-6807 



M»9 naba ' 



A 

Tradition 

Of 

Excellence 



Proudly Serving The 

Community For More Than 

60 Yrs. 



B-.flimtCIM 



Chevrolet • Oldsmobile • BMW • Honda 
Volkswagon • Hyundai • Mitsubishi 



Granite 

Countertops And Floor Tiles 
JOHN A. DERNAVICH INC. 

OF WILBRAHAM 
Call 596 • 6601 For More Info. 



COMMUNITY 




"The only way to travel is Cadillac style," 
according to freshmen Becky Orr, Bethany 
Sager, and Betsy Leritz, Shown in Cadillac's 
ultra luxury model, Allante. 




GyviCadcllac 

I N C. 

1 MILL STREET • SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 
TEL. 781 - 1677 



COMMUNITY 




Merchandise Group 



C. A. PELOUZE 

SPRINGFIELD CREDIT CENTRAL 
OPERATING MANAGER 



1585 BOSTON ROAD 
SPRINGFIELD, MA 01129 



(413) 543-3327 



COMMUNITY 



Heating, Air Conditioning 
and Ventilation Systems 



Carrier 



Hurley&Dauid 

Engineers, Contractors, Sales, installation, 
Service, Maintenance Contracts 



Our Business is 

Heating and cooling 

Your Business 732-3141 

90 RSK AVENUE, SPRINGFIELD, MA 01107 



& 



COMMUNITY 



Tri-Town Rubber Inc. 


2694 BOSTON ROAD 


NO. WILBRAHAM, MA 01095 


\ TEL. 596-3886 


QUALITY 


SERVICE 



GOLDEN PALACE 
Chinese Restaraunt 

1494 Wilbraham Rd. 
Springfield 
782-8083 



SUNSET STEP 
CO. 

2624 Boston Rd. 
Wilbraham, MA 

AU Types Of 
Concrete Products 

Home • Garden 
Commercial 



WILBRfiHfiM 



JfiCITO 
SfiLES 



2030 BOSTON RD. 

WILBRAHAM, MA. 413/543- 

5770 



Congratulations, Jeff!! 

Love, 

MOM, DAD & 

KAREN 





JanAr 

Gymnastic & 
Dance Center Inc. 

S96-4479 ' 596-2197 




AN 

ELEGANT 
ALTERNATIVE 



52 MofhSc. 

EaiT Longmeadow 
Party And £petiat 
Ocauium, DwiU 



Park-Main 
Travel Agency 

(413— 543-5550 

MEMBER OF THE COLBY 
GROUP 

1984 BOSTON ROAD 
WILBRAHAM 



MEDEIROS/WILLIAMS 
CHEVROLET 

SIMPLY THE FINEST 

Bus. Phone 543-6670 

2045 Boston Rd. 

WILBRAHAM, MA 

JOHN T. MEDEIROS 



COMMUNITY 



CINDYM* 



Restaurant And Lounge 

362 Cooley St. 

Springfield 

Entertainment 
Wed. - Sat. 9-1:30 

Lunches 
Mon. ■ Fri. 11:30-2:30 



GREEN 

ACRES 

FRUIT FARM 

868 Main St. 
Wilbraham 

596-3016 



SMITH & 

SMITH 



Residential • Commercial 
Industrial 

522 Main St. 
Hampden, MA 

566-8544 



E 



ealtor 



Congratulations 

To The 
Class Of 1989 

From 

PARKER 
DRUG 

1907 Wilbraham Rd. 

Springfield 

782-2318 



«,^" > "# 


.JdtossdL 


<4S^^& 


RESTARAUNT 


AND 


PUB 


2000 Boston Rd. 


Wilbraham, MA 


543-5032 



GLENDALE 
PLASTICS 

Where Foam 
Takes Form 

P.O. Box 406 
Ludlow, MA 

413 • 583 • 5011 



PEN INSURANCE 

AGENCY 

Home • Auto 
Business • Life 

153 Grove St. 
Chicopee, MA 

592 • 4666 

John A. Penso 



WILBRAHAM 

TENNIS 
CLUB 

Open Year Round 

Everyday 
8 AM Till Closing 

8 Courts 

2041 Boston Rd. 
Wilbraham 

543-1074 



BREADY'S 

12957 Boston Rd. 
No. Wilbraham, MA 

596-4091 
Mark A. Bready 



COMMUNITY 



INDUSTRIAL 

COMPONENTS 

CORP. 

2551 Boston Rd. 

Wilbraham 

596 • 3854 



HOUSE OF HAIR DESIGN 

IN 

Wilbraham 



on 



2141 BOS Tun fiOAD 

i with 



WILBRAHAM 
ANIMAL HOSPITAL 



ROBERT H. ROWE, D.V.M. 
PHONE (413) 596-8395 




2103 BOSTON ROAD 

WILBRAHAM. MA. 01093 

596-5112 




We're proud of you Kati-did! 
Love Mom 8? Dad 



r*r*+„+M 




7 RAILROAD AVE 
WILBRAHAM: MA 
(413)596-6177 

CREATIVE 
EXTERIOR & INTERIOR SIGNAGE 



WILBRAHAM 



& 



MOVIE STOP 

"WE HAVE THE MOVIES 
YOU WANT TO SEE" 

596-8051 



2797 BOSTON ROAD 
WILBRAHAM, MA. 01095 



Footwear 

for 

K \OS 

Wilbraham Shops 
599 - 1502 



CAMPUS PHARMACY 

300 Stafford Street 
Springfield, MA 01 104 

Telephone: 739-6316 



Adjacent to Mercy Hospital 
Nicholas E. Creanza, P.D. 



COMMUNITY 



■ 



§ 



i 



m 
•■'<<$ 



A Division of 
Meliklan, Inc. 




HORIZONS 



Fine Dining and Spirits 



2200 BOSTON ROAD 
WILBRAHAM, MA. 01095 



599-1271 



k<s 




Kimmy: 

Congratulations and best 
of luck always! 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, and Danny 



PRECISION 

POWER EQUIPMENT, 

INC. 

2400 BOSTON RD. 
WILBRAHAM, MA 01095 

SALES • SERVICE • PARTS 

ARIENS • SNAPPER • POULAN 

BUNTON • EXMARK • FERRIS 

PRO-CUT 

• SNOWBLOWERS 

RAY McNULTY 



M 



Taylor rental 



1997 Boston Rd. 

Wilbraham, MA 01095 

('113) 543-4255 

MON. 7:30-5:30 
TUES.-SAT. 8:00-5:30 



*V J 




r ^T"#" ,^ak_J 9M 


mm 


felb^^^Sp^i^p^W 




El aH=?SP HhHClFPCI 




*mm^:m£2>Zf* 




IAYLUR REN1AL. 



WHEN VdU NEfed tWALItV tftUIPMENt ¥AHt, bfeHfeNB 
OH tAVLtiW NteNtAL* tO HAVE It ANb HAVE It HltiHt! 



JILDEHl |L*WN>G*nU^H 



^S=> R 






IM^ 



£s§cwd° &i 



COMMUMITY 



Good Luck Kirsten and the Class of '89! 

Peter B. Vinson, CLU, ChFC 

and 
Associates 

One Monarch Place 

P.O. Box 2314 

Springfield, Massachusetts 01101 

(413)781-6964 



Variable Life Insurance - Disability Insurance 
Annuities - Investments 



MONARCH 




(205] 
COMMUNITY 



Best Wishes 

To 

Class Of "89" 

HOME MECHANICAL INSPECTIONS 

By 
Joseph A. Bottone 

General Contractor 
Residential 525 • 2252 Commercial 



MALL 

BARBER 
SERVICE 




HAIR CARE 

FOR THE 

ENTIRE FAMILY 

543-1738 

Eoitficld Moll. Spfd 



No Waling 
'$IXftARoER STYLISTS 






REALTORS* 




TWO ALLEN STREET 

HAMPDEN, MA 01036 413-566-5566 



100th Anniversay 




The Past The Present The Future 

WILBRAHAM VILLAGE STORE 




VINNY'S 
CITGO 



mc^io* 5 . 8 


.— —j.™ 


1Mb. 


aciPS'" 




■V 




R|i|HHB| 


Tom, 




We are very 


proud of you! 


Love, Mom and Dad 



COMMUNITY 



Sampson Family 

Serving Greater Springfield 
Since 1880 

782-5226 
FUNERAL SERVICES 

21 Tinkham Road 
Springfield 



frus. 

John 11 Sampson 



COMMUNITY 



Congratulations to the Class of 1989 
from your friends at 

ITOSSEiliilii'S 

bU Minute Photo Finishing 




Pictures are memories, and today is 

a day to remember! So, visit us at one 

of our five convenient locations: 

• Eastfield Mall, Springfield, 543-6699 

• Center Square Mall, Downtown Springfield, 
737-5656 

• Fairfield Mall, Chicopee, 593-3456 

• Riverdale Shopping Center, West Springfield, 
781-0394 

And Now At • "The X." Summer Avenue, Springfield, 731-7910 

at RUSSELL'S 60 MINUTE PHOTO 
we care about your memories! 



*}«t 76e 'pcctune 

ROBERT L. 
HOWARTH 



State IZepieteHtoUve 
t3t& *&*mfuteH Z>i4t>Uet 

Committees 

INSURANCE 

ETHICS 
JUDICIARY 

Room 473B 

Statehouse 

722 • 2230 

Residence 
7X2 • 4662 



MURPHY'S 

Trophies And Sports 

1225 Sumner Ave. 
Springfield, MA 

413 • 783 • 1275 






Congratulations to our 
Spanish son! We'll miss 
you! 

Love, your American 
Mom and Dad 



RAY TPOMBLEY 
ASSOCIATES 



Insurance 

Pensions 

Tax Planning 

Wilbraham Shops 
Wilbraham, MA 

Tel. 413 • 596 • 6992 



NORTHEASTERN 
PRINTING 

Commercial • Job 
Printing 

413 • 732 • 4125 
C. Bill Cote 

Pres. 

395 Dwight St. 

Springfield 



as%c<aissfsraS 

SULLIVAN 

BRONSON TERRACE 
7 8 8 • 4 7 8 



PIZZA PUB 
& 

RESTAURANT 




Breakfast 

Italian Dinners 

Grinders 

Cocktails 

2391 Boston Rd. 
Wilbraham, MA 

5% • 6168 
596 • 3500 
596 • 8806 

Gregory Barnagian 



COMMUNITY 



^ 




We love you, Marq! 
Mom, Dad, Vail, 
Lana, Chrys 









wm 



We love you! We'll 
miss our little carrot 
top next year! 

Mom, Dad, Molly, 

Bozo 






Liz: 

How the years have flown! We are all 
so proud of your accomplishments, 
and know that college is a challenge 
you are ready to assume! 

We love you! 

Mom, Dad and Steve 



k_<v 




Congratulations, 
Todd! 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Beth 

and Jane 




Karianne - 
Congratulations! 
We love you! 

Mom, Dad, and 

Amy 



Beit Wultu 



Fnmvb 



STEARNS 
YERRALL 



REALTORS 



Established 1911 



$ 



COMMUNITY 




BOAT COMPANY INC. 



~ZS&L%$g<& 




Springfield, MA 
121 West Street 
(413)739-4745 



'flic Only Logical Choice. 



MR. JOHN'S & JAN'S 



"THE WILBRAHAM SHOPS" 

2341 BOSTON ROAD 

WILBRAHAM, MA 01095 

(413)596-8144 



RoffljER 



'BARBER AND HAIR STYLIST" 



'-- ------- -- irH' i i i t \ *4 




Congratulations ! ! 
We love you Mike 

Mom, Anne, Chris 

& Dad 



^Best QAMes 



Louis&Clark 

DRUG STORES 

Helping you take care of yourself 
Wilbraham, MA 01095 



I> 



))) 



PIONEER 
PREMIUM 
PROMOTIONS 

16 MAPLE ST. 
EASTLONGMEADOW 

413-525-3313 

800-782-0062 

FAX 413-525-2764 

KATHY 

SELVIA 



Recognition 

Promotional 
Incentive 



COMMUNITY 



$ 





Kristen Mastroianni 



(413) 786-4557 




1 Greater /Media Cable 



16 Ames Ave 
Chicopee 



592-5171 




Right from the horse's 

mouth: 

Congratulations 

Wendy we're proud of 

you. 
Love, 

Mom, Larry, Mike, 
Gramma And Gramps 




to- 1k 



C&u Of 1989!! 

ALAN F. LERITZ D.D.S.P.C. 

Orthodontist 

1 Crane Park Drive 

Wilbraham 



COMMUNITY 



Congratulations 
To The Class Of 1989 


1 %. 


SULLIVAN'S 


>ip 


.J 


MOUNTAIN VIEW 

DRIVE-IN 




SULLIVAN'S MOUNTAIN VIEW DRIVE IN 


SEi 


- 


. > 


ITHPlOP 


25 Allen St. 
Hampden, MASS 

Lunch Dinner 


^ 




*| 


Multiflavor 
Soft Serve 


1 


*ru 


f 

3 



DONNA BURNETTE 



cfii 

INTERIORS 



COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL 



BOSTON ROAD • WILBRAHAM. 
413-596-5546 



Congratulations Rick! 
We're so proud of 
you. We love you. 





"Where did the time 
go?" 




May the world always 
be as beautiful for you 
as you have made it 
for us. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Peg, Jeff 






1359 WILBRAHAM ROAD 
SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 01119 



GARDEN SUPPLIES 
NURSERY-STOCK - 
CHRISTMAS SHOP 

POTTERY 

FLORIST 



TELEPHONE (413) 783-5883 - 783-0521 



JOHN S. BORDENUK 
PRESIDENT 




Keep up the good 
work. 

The families! 



COMMUNITY 



# 




CLEANERS, INC. 



STEAM CARPET AND UPHOLSTERY CLEANERS 



262 ALLEN STREET 
SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 01108 



"Remember to dress for success and 
have your wardrobe cleaned by the expert: 
at Pari; Cleaners." 



HONOR TAKORIAN 

Sales Representative 

(413) 736-5476 




$ 



You've come a long 
way from the tube! 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, T.J., 

Bill, Becky, and 

Liz 



COMMUNITY 




.... 



Danielle — 

You never cease to 

amaze us — 
Much Love, 
Mom, Dad, 
Nicole, Noel, & 
Colette 




We love you 
Mom, Dad 

Susan 




I JiL 

Congratulations Jeff, 
we love you and wish 
you the very best in 
the future. 

Mom, Dad, John, 
Jim and Tenley 



W. F. LOGAN 

INSURANCE 

AGENCY, INC. 

WILBRAHAM SHOPS • BOSTON ROAD 

WILBRAHAM, MASS. 01095 

AUTO • HOME • BUSINESS • LIFE 



KIDDER, PEABODY, AND CO. 

Incorporated 



Congratulations 
Michelle! 

One Monarch 

Place 

Springfield 



1-413-785-4976 



WATS 1-800-628-9406 



TITO 0777 

[TE7ffl 

"Each of us is what 
we believe of 
ourselves." 

Chekhov 

Love, 

Mom &? David 



To Bootsie, Rudy, 
Lynn 

May the wind be 
always at your back 

Love, Mom, Dad, 
& Kim 



"UHUBBJ 






:P 


l| i II*j 


1 




i 


■ 




To Allie — 
Our love and best 
wishes for success 
and happiness 

Ron, Barb, and 

Kathy 



Good times 

...and 




A WINNING COMBINATION. 




COMMUNITY 



$ 



JJhem 
Gremers 

I a family of 

I PHOTOGRAPHERS 



Best Wishes For Success And Happiness 
In The Future To The Class of 1989 




Lisa, Dan, Chris nffiHal 1 QRQ 

850 High Street, Holyoke, Mass. 01040 | „_-„ Virk j M „„ UttlCiai 1*8* 

127 Mill Street, Springfield, Mass. 01108 * *' * 1UU » iV1<Ut ClaSS Photographers 



734 • 7337 



& 



COMMUNITY 



■ vUilbra.lia.tn 
-Z/rue Value ^hrarda 



STORE 
(413) 596-8U73 

2701 BOSTON ROAD 
WILBRAHAM. MASSACHUSETTS 01095 



WINDOW SHADES 
TRU-TEST PAINT 

SHARPENING 
LAMPS REWIRED 



KEYS MADE 

GLASS CUT 

SCREENS REPAIRED 

MOWER TUNE-UPS' 



The 

Wilbraham Insurance 

Agency, Inc. 



SANDRA L. FREEMAN 



SERVICE DOOR 
AND WINDOW 

186 Stafford St. 
Springfield 

737-4115 




Congratulations, 

Katie, 

Now it's on to bigger 

and better things! 
Good Luck 
Mom & Dad 



& 


I \T^m B 




I 


Ibraham 
hops 


! 


Boston Road 
Wilbraham, MA 






til 

rrom the first day of 
school to the last, 
you've always made 
us proud! 

Mom, Dad, & Erin 




Kirsten, 

Take now your chance 
to reach for more we 
love you now and 
always will. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, & Alex 



WILBRAHAM 

BARBER 

SHOP 



Springfield St. 
Wilbraham 

Mon, Tue, Fri, 9-6 
Thurs. 9-8 Sat. 9-5 



596-8870 

Gwg Lockkont 
Ptopltifoc 



COMMUNITY 



& 



We 

think 

your past 

is worth 

looking 

into... 



PSTENS 

e yearbook company 



Michael, 

Reach For The Stars! 

We Love You. 

MOM AND DAD 




Listen to the mustn's 
Listen to the don'ts 
Listen to the shouldn'ts 
The Impossibles, the 

won'ts 
Listen to the never 

haves 
Then listen close to me 

Anything can happen, 
ANYTHING CAN BE! 








TOYOTA 
OlKSWAGEN 




1979 Boston Road V 

Just East 6i thfe Eastfield Mall !■ 



iiliii! 



COMMUMITY 



Our Special 

Thanks 

To 

Dr. Kevin L. Trombly DMD 

Dr. George H. Nieske DMD 

Drs. Haines And 

Belcastro MD 
Dr. Hennessy DMD 




Wishing You Were Here 

Wishing you were down here 
but instead you're up there. 
I wish God had never taken 

you. 
I wish I didn't have to live 

without you, 
but I do. 
And all I can do is think of 

you. 

I know you're not down here to 

see me grow up. 
But I know you're up there 

looking out. 
You are still inside my heart. 

I was too young to understand 
but inside I knew you were 
gone. 

I'll never forget all the 

memories because, 
Tony, you were my big brother, 
the one who would be there 

forever. 

I know you know how I feel 

inside 
but I wish it would hide. 
The only thing 1 wish I could 

change, 
is to bring you back to me. 
I know I can't bring you back 

to me 
but you'll always remain with 

me. 
I wish I could see you soon 
but I know that won't come 

true, 
until the day that God takes 

me to you. — Johanna 



EsHD 



LANDRY LYONS 

&WHYTE COMPANY 



^Better eg 

I I ini Aland Gardens® 




GOOD 

LUCK 

SENIORS! 



466 Main Street, Wilbraham - 596-6711 




Seven Years Since You Left For 
Heaven 

It's already been seven 
since you left for heaven. 

Each year we miss you more 
than the year before. 

Our only consolation is 
your bliss. 

Often when I think of you 
I think of the beautiful 
butterfly, who flys from 
flower to flower extracting 
the nectar. 

And how you were like the 
butterfly extracted much 
from the world in your 
short ten years. 

And you gave much to your 
family and friends. 

Missing you with love, 
Mom, Dad, Leah, Debbie, 
Elaine, Peter, and me. 



PINO 
OIL 
CO. 
INC. 

1304 Worchester St. 

Indian Orchard 

785-1596 



COMMUNITY 



^ 




Megan Nicoli, Lisa Merigian, and Hard Rock Cafe in Mew York City. 
Cynthia Brescia enjoy lunch at the 



Adamson, Jason 92: 56, 130 

Agnew, Christine 89: 19, 66, 67, 82, 173, 

182 
Albano, Christopher 89: 18, 82, 187 
Albano, Kristi 90: 38, 114 
Albee, Douglas 92: 63, 72, 130, 185 
Alberici O'Connor, Donna : 136 
Alberici, Regina : 158, 159 
Allard, Denise 91: 122, 123, 125, 170, 

173, 174, 180 
Alquist, Kristine : 136 
Alves, Diane 90: 114 
Alves, Susan 92: 130 
Anderson, Cory 92: 130 
Anderson, James 91: 56, 122 
Anderson, Lisa 92: 130 
Andre, Nicholas 91: 122 
Andrews, Mark 89: 78, 79, 82, 148 
Anzalone, Christopher :90 60, 114 
Apple, Adam 91: 122 
Arslanian, Candace 91: 51, 122, 180 
Ascolillo, Emily 91: 122 
Ashton, Daniel 90: 41, 114 
Ashwell, April 91: 122 
Asmar, Oliver 90: 60. 114 
Asmar, Omar 91: 122 
Asselin, Michele 92: 130 
Ats, Istvan : 41, 160, 206 
Ats, Marilyn : 136, 139 
Axiolis, Stephen 89: 20, 82, 146, 147 



Babmeau, Angela 92: 130, 16 
Bachelder, Jason : 42, 43 
Badger, Jerry : 136, 139 
Baer, Christopher 90: 7. 11, 2 



60, 



Bailey, Deanna 91: 122 

Bailey, William 90: 114 

Baker, Christine 90: 114 

Balmer, Philip 92: 130 

Balser, Daniel : 38, 53. 136 

Bamford, Donald : 136, 139 

Bannon, Rachel 92: 130, 187 

Barber, Amy 91: 39, 52. 53, 122, 174, 
176, 187 

Barber, Lois : 136 

Barnes, Dawn 89: 82. 150 

Baron, Bridget 92: 26, 64. 130 

Barrett. Martin : 49, 136 

Barrett, Ryan 91: 34, 76, 122 

Barry, David : 44, 136, 139 

Barton, Teresa : 136 

Batista, Mary 92: 130 

Baits, Richard : 109, 180, 187 

Baughan, Bill : 41 

Bcacom. Rebecca 92: 58. 59. 130. 135. 
187 

Bcakc, Xcnophon 91: 122 

Bcauprc. Michelle 90: 19. I 14 

Bcclcr. Charles : 136, 185 

Bclcaslro. John : 40, 41, 162 

Belcher, David 90: 56. 114, 173 

Belcher, Kandra 92: 53. 75. 130 

Belden, Elizabeth 89: 82 

Bcldcn. Stephen 91: 34, 35, 122, 127, 165, 

167. 178 
Beleski, Cynthia 89: 82 
Bellivcau, Eric 91: 56, 122 
Belliveau, Keri 89: 15, 82 
Belli>eau, Robert 89: 82, 142, 143 
Bennett, Christopher 89: 76, 82. 144, 145 



Bennett, Clark 90: 114 

Bennett, David : 41, 74, 136 

Bennett, Jeffrey 89: 8, 46, 76, 82, 113, 

186, 187 
Bennett, Linda : 136 
Bennett. Wendy : 47, 166, 167 
Benoit, Carrie 90: 114 
Benting, Heather 89: 82, 83, 97 
Bentley, Amy : 162 
Bergeron, Jason 89: 6, 15, 41, 54, 83, 87, 

180 
Bernard, Sandra 90: 114 
Bernardo, Jennifer 90: 114 
Bernardo, Sharon 89: 83 
Bernstein, David : 136 
Berte, Anne 91: 27, 39, 53, 66, 67, 81, 

122, 174 
Bertelli, Kristopher 91: 34, 122 
Bevins. Mark : 175 
Bienvenue, Connie : 136 
Bienvenue, Spence 92: 130 
Bigos, Nancy 91: 39, 58, 59, 122 
Bilik, Darrin 89: 34, 60, 70, 71, 83, 176 
Bishop. Brian 91: 72, 122, 185 
Bissonnette, Alan : 109 
Blair, Shawn 91: 122 
Blanchard, Frank 92: 130 
Blaser, Nichole 90: 114 
Bleau, Heather 92: 130 
Bleau, Jason 91: 122 
Blomberg, Eileen 90: 15. 45, 114, 120, 

180 
Blomstrom, Kevin 89: 34. 83, 176 
Blondek, James 91: 122 
Bluteau, Nicole 92: 64. 130 
Boduch, Eric 92: 63, 72, 130 
Boissonnaull, Nicole 92: 130 
Bolek, Nicole 91: 122, 187 
Borsari, Brian 91: 34, 35, 122, 170, 172 
Borsari, Judith : 136 
Borsari, Mark : 34, 35 
Boucher, Kim 89: 51, 83, 105, 162, 174 
Boudreau, Carrie 92: 130, 134 
Bower, Douglas 92: 56, 130 
Brady, Lara 89: 84, 174 
Brady, Nicole 90: 13, 45, 64, 65, 114 
Braskie. Meredith 90: 66, 114, 174, 175, 



Brayton, Peter : 42 

Brescia, Cynthia 92: 50, 130 

Bresette, Kalherine 92: 53, 78, 79, I 

Breton. Jennifer 92: 130 

Brewer. Mary Lou : 136, 159, 207, 

Briolta, Lisa : 162 

Briotta, Michael 91: 122 

Brown, Chad 91: 42, 43. 72, 122 

Brown, Charles 91: 122 

Brown, Cynthia : 136 

Brown, Heather 91: 48, 49, 122, 12' 

185 
Brown, Richard : 136, 139 
Brunellc. Roger 91: 34, 56, 68, 69. 

170, 180, 185 
Bruno, Jason : 17, 41, 71, 140, 161 
Bruton, Robert 92: 130. 140 
Bunnell, Douglas 90: 114 
Burger. Kevin 91: 56. 72. 122 
Burger. Todd 92: 56. 130 
Burk. Melissa 91: 53. 66. 67. 122 
Burke. Beverly 92: 130, 185 
Burke, Dennis 89: 41. 48. 49, 84 
Burke, Kathleen 90: 12. 39, 52, 53, 

118 
Burke. Timothy 89: 27, 76. 84. 101 

144, 145 
Burncltc, Bradley 91: 122 




e 



Cahill, Amy 92: 130 
Callahan, Karen 90: 114 
Callahan, Robin 92: 130 
Camerlin, Timothy 91: 76, 117, 12 
Campbell, Kristen 91: 122 
Campbell, Robert : 109 
Campbell, Rodrick : 41, 109, 166, 
Campbell, Sean 91: 41, 122, 166, 
Carling, Kimberly 89: 84, 176 
Carlotto, Christine 89: 85 
Carr, Brian 89; 84 
Carr, Jason 91: 34, 72, 122 
Carr, Ronald 91: 122 
Carroll, Nicole 90: 114 
Carter, Jason 92: 130 
t asagrande, John 92: 130 
Cascio, Patricia : 136 
Castonguay, Stephen : 136 
Cauley, George : 60 
Cavanaugh, Brendan 92: 63, 130 
Cavros, Kristen 92 130, 174, 185 
Cerasa, Diama 91: 81, 122, 148, 1 

180, 187 
Cesan, Kerry 89: 6, 85, 183 
Cesan, Molly 91: 122 
Chamberlain, Kari 89: 14, 19, 85 
Chambers, John 89: 15, 22, 85, IS 
Champigny. James 90: 114 
Champigny, Laura : 109 
Champigny, Michael 92: 130 
Chase, Pamela 92: 53, 130 
Chase, Richard 89: 42, 60, 76, 85, 
Chechette, Karen 89: 85 
Chechelte, Sieve 92: 130 
Chechile, Andrea 91: 66, 67, 122. 

176. 185 
Chenaille, Kurt 89: 21. 85 



Chii 



56 



Cho, Young 89: 85 

Christensen, Erik 89: 85. 161 

Christie, John 89: 8, 85, 111, 186, 187 

Christofori, Bryan 92: 63. 130 

Chung, Bonita 90: 114 

Chung, Rony : 109, 154 

Cipriani, Laura : 109 

Cirillo, Giovanni 92 62, 63, 130 

Cirillo, Ralph : 40. 41 

Clark, Christine 90: 114, 115, 162 

Clark, James 91: 122, 156 

Clarke, Dirk 89: 85, 140 

Clines, Andrew 92: 130 

Cochran, Adam 89: 86 

Colclough, Heather 92: 50, 66, 67, 130 

Cole, Shaun 89: 6, 26, 86, 180 

Collette, Cory : 44 

Collier, Cathleen 91: 122, 174. 180 

Collins. Katerie 89: 6. 52, 53, 86, 161, 

162, 174 
Connell. Benjamin 90 41, 48, 49, 1 14, 173 
Connell, James 90: 34, 72, 114 
Constantine, Jason 92: 130 
Cook, Monica 89: 39, 86 
Cooper, Fred 89: 86 
Cormier, Janice : 136 
Counos, Ann 89: 13, 39, 66. 67, 86, 180 
Coupal, Colleen 91: 122 
Courchesne, Eric 90: 114 
Courtney, Anne 90: 114, 140, 161, 174, 

176, 180, 182, 185 
Courtney, Deborah 90: 9, 39. 52, 53. 114 
Courtney, Marie 92: 64, 130 
Couture, Danielle 89: 19. 86, 97, 112 
Cowee. James 90: 76, 114, 146 
Coyle, Shawn 63, 130 
Crafts, Julie 90: 114, 119. 163 
Crafts, Lynn 89: 86, 163 
Crespo, Carlos 89: 34, 76, 86, 111 
Crimmins, Scott : 42, 43 
Crivelli. Stephanie 90: 114, 117, 119 
Crocker, Elizabeth 89: 14, 86 
Crocker. Rebecca 90: 39, 52. 53. 66. 67. 



Chfccko. Jeffrey 90: 76, 
Childs, Daphne 89: 85 
Childs, Elizabeth 91: 12 



146 




Doug Rose, Jen Shaw and Mi 
chelle Laferriere enjoy their NYC 
outing with the International 
Club. 



Exchange student Ko Shimuzu 
joined the International Club in its 
October visit to the Big Apple. 



Croteau, Scot! 91: 122 


Draper. Jeremy 91: 41, 122, 123 


Female members of Miss Brewer's 


taken before the dance contest on 




Croleau, Steven 91: 34, 122 


Driscoll, Marie : 137. 139 


Senior Seminar Class show their 


November 21, 1989. 




Cullen, Erin : 162 


Drury. Raymond : 137 


spirit as they pose for a picture 






Cummings. Rob : 41, 173 


Dubord. James 92: 63. 72. 131 








Currier, Stacy 92: 130 


Duby. Michelle 90: 114 
Ducharmc. Amanda 92: 131 










K HTIH 










Duff. Don : 34. 60 


Kaiv 








V 


Dugan. Caillin 89: 89 


IbBHC^!^^H 








Dugan. Matthew 92: 131 


■\ 










Duran. Peter : 123 


^P*^^^^Kjt v^^^SK k i 










Durzy. Alexander 92 68. 69. 131 


m&^nmL*-JLj 










Durzv. Peggy : 137 


m wUSl 








D'Amalo, Edward 92: 63. 130 


Dutil. Erica 91: 39, 50, 78. 79. 81. 122. 










Dahm, Kevin : 158, 159, 160, 167 


148. 174. 178 




mk 






DalMolin. JoAnn : 136 






MM 9B - *P 






Daly. Brendan 91: 42. 43, 60. 79, 122, 148 


_ 




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Daly, Tara 91: 24, 58, 59, 122. 125, 170. 


& 


jpH ^^k^H ^Bt> ~\ * 






174. 179, 180 


& 


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Damarjian, Tamara 92: 130 






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Daniele, Christopher 91: 34. 122. 146 




HKb V HjL^ 


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Daniels. Jeffrey 91: 122 


Eaton, Kimberly 89: 15, 39. 89. 98. 180 


SH. jjfl 


mi 






Danio, Peter 89: 86 




Danker. Christine : 136 


Edery. Michael 91: 60. 76. 122 


^H^V* 


1 ■« m * 






Danlhony, Diane : 136 


Ehle. Bcrnd : 41 


1 km '• I 


1 jjm 






David, Andrea 92: 64, 130 


Eisold, Melissa 90: 114, 163. 179 


km JLJI 






David. Jen : 41 


Ellis. Erica 91: 122 


M km **aM0 








Davidson, Amy 90: 15,58,59. 114, 115, 


Ellis. Laurie 89: 89. 113. 164. 167. 173 


m km 111 








120, 121, 163, 179 


Ellison, Eric 90: 41, 116 


^ W* mM 








Davis, Yeshiva 89: 86, 94 


Emerle. Rebecca 89: 6. 14. 39. 48, 49. 89. 

106. 121. 173. 180 


^^Hi^S «^r« 








Dean, William 92: 56, 130 










Dearden, Jennifer 89: 27, 47, 78. 79. 87. 


Emerle. Susanne : 162 


Frederick. Eric 92: 131 


Garccau. Tracy : 45 




148, 173, 176. 182 


Estrada. Lori 92: 25. 64. 131. 135 


Fredericks. Jamie : 41 


Garcia. Jorge : 41. 206 




Dearden. Margaret 92: 53. 79. 130 


Estrada, Robert 89: II. 24. 46. 47. 89 


Freeman. Rcjinald 91: 125 


Gardner. Scan : 109 




Debarge. Derek : 109 




Fridlington. Bill 7. 9. 15. 79D 


Gartner. Peter : 137. 139 




Deblois. Lisa 90: 114. 140 




Fridlington. William 91: 7. 9. 15. 79. 125 


Gaudclte. Mara 92: 48. 49. 75. 131 




Decesare, Dana 92: 131 


*3 


Froehlich, Christine 89: 3. 6. 9. 22. 90. 


Gaudettc. Shari : 45 




Decoteau. Sherry 92: 79. 131 


7 


162. 180. 182 


Gauticr. Lisa 91: 125 




Deely, John : 52. 137. 137 




Furst. Edward 91: 41. 79. 125. 148 


Gawron. Brian 91: 125 




Deforest. James 90: 41. 68, 69, 114. 180 






Gcboskic. Matthew 90: 116 




Degray. Mark 92: 56. 131 






Gcldart. Allison 92: 74. 131 




Delisle. Laurie 92: 50. 131. 161 


Falls. Artis : 41. 60. 109. 187 


/5 


Geldart. Gregory : 41. 206 




Demarjian, Richard 89: 87 


Falzonc. Kristcn 91: 38. 64. 122. 127. 129. 


Cf, 


(Entile. Michael 89: 76. 91. 144. 145 




Demosthenous. Christie : 207 


174. 180 


r 


Gcnza. Doria 90: 116 




Demosthcnous. Sarah 91: 39. 79. 122. 148, 


Farrah. Charles 92: 56. 72. 131 




Gerhard. Frank 90: 48. 173. 116 




174, 176. 180 


Farrah. Kristina 89: 15. 19. 89. 112 




(.ianantoni. Jessica 89: 20. 91. 166 




Dennis, Katherine 89: 10, 11. 15. 39, 51, 


Fan-ell. John 91: 42. 60. 68. 69. 122 


Gagliarducci. Jerome 92: 63. 72. 131 


Giantris. Ann 91: 45. 50. 66. 67. 124. 




87, 173 


Farrcll. Megan : 28 


Gagnon. Catherine 91: 50. 79. 125. 128. 


125. 140. 174. 176. 180. 185 




Dernatich, Jeffrey 89: 13. 17. 40. 41. 70. 


Farrow. Carmen 89: 89 


157. 170. 174. 176. 179. 180 


Gibb. David 90: 42. 43. 54. 116. 




71, 87, 111. 170.172. 173, 180, 182 


Fcrnandcs. Joao 91: 125 


Cagnon, Denis 89: 90. 178 


149 




Dcsautcllc, Johanna : 137 


Fernandez. Tania 91: 50. 125. 153. 174. 


Gagnon. Jill 91: 125. 184 


Gibb. Rebecca 92: 131 




DeSimone. David 90: 15. 114. 173 


180 


Galarneau, John 89: 6. 90. 165 


(Jibbs. Todd 89: 6. 91. 173. 176. ISO 




DeSimone. Elizabeth : 137 


Fcrrcira. Maria 90: 116. 142 


Gallagher. Sheila : 15 


Gibson. Rcnec : 174. IS5 




Desjardins. Anthony 92: 9. 56. 131 


Fcrrindino. Jennifer 92: 131 


Gallcher. James 91: 125 


Gil. Lori 90: 11. 45. 65. 116. 152. 170. 




Desjardins. June 90: 114 


Ferris. Leslie 92: 131 


Gallchcr. Patrick 34. 79. 148 


173. 183 




Desjardins, Melissa 89: 87, 163, 179. 182 


Fey. Margaret : 137. 139 


Garabcdian. David 90: 42. 54. 116. 185 


Gil. Lynn 92: 131. 187 




Deslauricrs. Paul : 137. 139 


Fiedler. Stephen 89: 10. II. 24. 41. 54, 


Garccau. Jodi 90: 38. 51. 114. 116. 120. 


Giles. Brad : 160 




Dcsousa. Trisla 92: 131 


71. 89, III. 170 


121 


Gillcn. Beth 90: 45. 64. 116. 170. 179 




Dcvinc. Day 90: 26. 74. 75. 114 
Devrics. Paul 92: 63. 131 
DcWolf. James : 137, 139 


Fiedler. Susan 90: 15. 39. 5 1 . 1 16. 1 21 . 
163, 170. 179. 180. 185 








Field. Adam 91: 56. 125 










Dickinson, Jennifer 90: 114. 140 


Fiore. Susan 89: 89. 166. 167. 173. 180 


!'.,v< "■. ■ ""'" 






Dickinson. Lisa : 158. 159 


Fiore. Tina 92: 131 










Dickinson. Todd 89: 3, 46. 54. 87. 170. 


Fitt. Heather 91: 125 










173. 180. 185. 186. 187 


Fill. Rebecca 89: 90 




^^^^S^t ' 






Dieterle. Brian 89: 88 


Fills. Susan : 137 


HH^Hebk 








DiFlumera. Laura Jean 89: 88 


Fitzgerald. Aim 89: 6. 13. 36. 74, 75. 90. 
170. 171. 182. 223 


¥TT¥ 








Dill. Holly 92: 131 




Dill. Ralph 91: 122 


Fitzgerald. Brian : 42. 43 


t 








Dillon. Joseph 90: 114 


Fitzgerald. Kcclv :91 15. 16. 28. 38. 125. 


A. ^i& 








Dinoia. Norma 91. 122 


170. 174. 176. 180. 182 


> t ,. 


mmm?-*^B 






Dionne. Robert 89: 42. 88. 1 10. 173. 180. 
185 


Fitzgerald. Paul : 28. 41 
Flagg. Sharon : 5 1 


xJ%JBr' 






Diolalevi, Kimberly 89: 15. 20. 64. 65. 88. 


Flannigan. Emily : 162 


^^^l J"^W* 


▼™^y 






90 


Fletcher. Eric 91: 125 


j, ■■■■\ 






Dolahcr. Brian 91: 34. 76. 122. 146. 147 


Flynn. Francis 90: 42. 60. 1 16. 167. 173 


. .. 9l| Vi| 








Dolan. Diana 92: 131 
Dolan. Frank 90: 60. 114 


Flvnn. Neil : 46. 206 
Foley. Scan 91: 125 


j#W < 1Si 






Donnelly. Patricia : 1 37 


Folcv. Shannon 89 90 


mHvkS^H 






Donnelly. Sandra 92: 64. 131 


Folvi. Peter : 56 


¥ '^^M| 








Donncl, Craig : 109 


Fonte. John 90: 116 










Donoian. Amy 89: 88 


I'orcicr. Andrew 92: 68. 69. 131 










Donovan. Michael 91: 122 


I'orcicr. Bree 90: 12. 115. 116. 119. 140. 










Donovan. Patricia : 137 


163. 179. 182. 187. 










Douthwright. James : 162 


I'orcicr. Joanne : 137 










I)o»d. Bonnie 89: 88 


Foricr. Robbie : 68 










l)o«d. Mark 89: 42, 60, 89 


Former. Joanne : 137 








Dovvd. Peter 92: 1 3 1 


Forrant. KimberK 92: 64. 131 


r J&- 






Dowd. Susan 90: 114 
Dowling. Kerri 92: 131. 131 
Downey. Kevin : 109 


Forticr. Robert 91: 69. 125. 129. 170. 174. 
loss. Mist\ 91. 125. 174. 176 


** 












I)o>lc. Jennifer 89: 6. 8. 9. 15. 22. 87. 89. 


Frackelton. Dorian 92: 131 


SOME THINGS DO CHANGE! Tom 


take them to their first day of 




111. 165. 173. 180 


1 radc. Joseph 90: 116 


Mango and Allison Mullet sit to- 


school. 




Drake, Keiin 89: 89. 112 


I'rantzcn. David 92: 131 


gether as they wait for the bus to 







a 



On Halloween, Amy Fitzgerald is 
relieved that she can finally go 
home after her Advanced Writing 
class with Mr. Spencer. 



! 9 




Glover. Matthew 92: 63, 131 
Goebel, Chrisloper 89: 34. 35. 91 
Goodhind. Brian 91: 72, 125 
Goodreau. Kimberly 90: 116 
Goodrich, Charice 92: 131 
Goodrich, Jason 89: 91 
Goodrich, John 89: 91, 174, 180 
Goodwin, William 90: 116 
Gordon, Patricia : 137 
Gore, Fredrick 89. 91 
Gore. Raymond 90: 116 
Graham, Adricnne 91: 125 
Graham, Todd : 44 
Gralenski, Steven 91: 125 
Gralinski, Michael 89: 91 
Gralinski, Shawn 92: 48, 49, 131 
Granaudo, Karen 92: 53, 131 
Granaudo, Lynda 89: 17, 91, 167. 173 
Granaudo. Victor : 137, 178 
Grande, Gladys : 47 
Grant, Rylan 91: 41, 56. 125. 127. 129. 

166 
Graveline, Laura 92: 75, 131 
Gray, Derek 92: 131 
Grayer. Tracy : 38 
Green, Chester : 41, 109 
Greene, Amy 89: 39, 50. 51 . 91. 140, 161 

170 



Gregoire, Khrislopher 90: 116 

Griffin. Kerrv : 28 

Criswold, Penny 89: 6, 7, 8. 15, 67. 91 

180. 181, 182, 186, 187 
Grondalski, Daniel 90: 116 
Grono. Jennifer 92: 75, 131 
Gutride, Alicia 91: 125 
Guziec, Joan : 137 
Gwatkin, Wes : 42, 43 



W 



Haggerty, Mark 90: 54, 71. 72, 116, 167, 

173 
Hall, Eric 92: 63, 131 
Hall, Gretchen 89: 91, 187 
Halloran. Brendan 92: 12, 56, 79, 131, 



Halloran, J. 
Hamel, Gar 



137, 173 



Hamer, Ty : 71 

Hanrahan, Christopher 91: 26, 125 

Hanrahan, Susan 89: 6, 39, 92, 112, 

186, 187 
Hanscom, Daniel : 137, 139 
Hanson, Bonnie 92: 58, 59, 131, 187 
Hanson, Jill 90: 116, 182 
Hanson, Rob : 42, 43 



# 



Hapgood. Scott 91: 125, 146 
Harrington, Jennifer 91: 125, 128 
Harris, Danielle 90: 51, 116 
Harris, Denise : 10, I! 
Harris, Edward 92: 12, 56, 79, 131 
Havnes. James : 137 



K 



opher 92: 63, 72 



Hcbert. Chr 

Hcbert. Thomas 91: 125 

Hcdlund. Scth 92: 132 

Hecdc. Alexis 91: 39, 52, 125, 140, 170. 

174, 176, 179, 1X0, 185 
Heede, Conrad 89: 41, 48, 49, 92, 161, 

Heiney, Diane : 1 37 

Herbert, Jennifer 92: 132 

Herbert, Linda 89: I, 9, 36. 37, 92, 167 

172. 173. 180. 181, 182 
Hersman. Andrew 90: 42. 76, 116, 120, 

144, 145, 167. 170, 173 
Hertz, Kimberly 89: 92, 174, 175, 176 
Hertz, Steven 91: 125 
Hess. Erik 90: 116 
Hick, Donna : 137. 163 
Hiersche, Jason 89: 92 
Higginbottom, Lee 89: 11. 34. 92 
Hill. Frederick 92: 132 
Hill, Tina 90: 39, 116 
Hodges. David : 109 
Hoffman. Kathryn 90: 6, 18. 64. 1 16, 1 

120 
Hofmann. Ronald : 137, 139 
Holdsworlh, Clay 91: 42, 56, 123, 125 
Holegir, Stephen : 109 
Holt, Clifford 92: 76, 132 
Holt, Russell : 138 
Horacek. Kathy : 36, 37 
Howell, John 89: 92. Ill 
Howells, Amanda 91: 48, 49, 125, 185 
Hsiao, Sarah 91: 38, 53, 124, 125 
Hudson, Kelli 91: 125, 179, 185 
Hunter. Wendy 89: 92 
Hupfer. Holly 89: 92 
Hupfcr. Stephanie 91: 125 
Huszar. Ryan 90: 76, 116, 146 
Huszar. Susan 89: 92, 146 



lacolo. Bruno 89: 92, 143 
Ingerson, Brian 89: 92 

Ingram, Kimberly 92: 58, 67, 132 
Ingram, Kurt 91: 125 



Mi., 



Mark 



Jablonski, Jonathan 90: 34, 116, 185 

Jablonski, Kalherine 92: 132 

Jacek, Don : 41 

Jackson, Heath 90: 27, 116 

Jackson, Michael 92: 13, 131, 132, 174, 

185 
Jackson, William 89 93, 105. 160. 172. 

173, 174, 175, 178. 179, 180, 181 
Jacobs, Mary Beth 89: 10. 11. 39, 48, 93, 

170, 173, 180, 181 
Jacobs. Stacy 91: 125 
Janis, Michael 89: 34. 60, 70. 71. 93 
Jenkins, Sara 90: 47, 116, 170 
Jenkins, Willie : 148 
Jenkinson, Amy 92: 19, 58, 59, 132, 133 
Jensen, Ellen 89: 93 
Jcserki, Diane : 138 
Johnson, Cynthia 89: 93 
Johnson, Michelle 89: 93 
Johnson, Robert : 138, 223 
Jones, Jeffrey 89: 94. 101 
Jones, Michelle 90: II, 19, 116, 185 
Jordan, Rich : 44 
Jordan, Ron : 41 

Jose, Jennifer 90: 51, 116, 154, 156 
Joyal, Eric 92: 132 
Joyal, Robert 89: 94, 185 



Kacoyannakis, Marios : 138, 139 
Kanzinger, Erica 89: 39. 51. 66. 67, 94, 

162, 173. 174 
Kapner. John : 1 2 
Kapner, Jonathan 92: 132 
Kasten, Amy 89: 94 
Kasten, Jodi : 165 
Kasten, Jody 92: 132 
Kealv, Timothy 89: 94. 181, 186, 187 
Keeler, Eric 89: 34, 54, 94, 223 
Keeton, Tammy 89: 95 
Keller, Nicole 90: 15, 116, 117, 187 
Kennedy, Jennifer 89: 95, 173, 174, 175 



185, 



180 



187 



170, 



Kennedy, Michele 89: 13, 15, 36, 52, 53, 

95, 170, 180 
Kcnney, Bruce : 138 
Kerbel, Jonathan 92: 132, 176 
Kcrtenis, Scott 90: 42, 76, 116, 144, 145 
Kibbe, Jonathan 92: 56, 132 
Kibbe, Martin : 76, 138. 144 
Kibbe, Matthew : 146 
Kibbe, Steven 90: 116 
Kibbe. Sue : 6 
Kida, Terri : 138 
Kilduff, Kenneth 90: 116 
Kim, Eun-Ah 92: 132 
Kim, Melanic : 187 
King, Jan : 138 
King, Philip 91: 68, 69, 125 
Kirchgessncr, Chris : 138 
Kirschling, Robert : 138 
Klepfer, William : 162, 175 
Kline, Susan : 136, 138, 208 
Knowles, Brett 89: 20, 32, 43, 76, 95, 1 1 

144, 145. 170. 173. 176, 180 
Kobcr. Samantha 91: 27, 38, 52, 53, 74, 



75, 



125 



Kober, William : 138, 139 

Komla, Stanley 90: 116, 142 

Koppelmann, Brett 91: 125 

Kostka, Ericka 90: 45, 116, 173, 174 

Kotomski, Mary 91: 125 

Kowalski, Michele : 36, 37 

Kozub. David 91: 42, 60, 125, 170 

Kranenburg, Estella 89: 3, 93, 95, 105. 



176 



182, 183 
Krawiec, Karin 89: 95 

Kritzky, Dale 91: 125 

Krzesik, Lauren : 148, 149 

Kubinski, James : 44. 206 

Kujath, Kim 90: 115, 116, 119, 162 

Kulis, Mark 92: 12, 132, 185 

Kullberg, Matthew 90: 116 

Kullis. Mark : 72 

Kumming. Robert 90: 72, 114, 116 

Kurpaska. Staccy 91 : 1 25 

Kuselias, Christian 90: 34, 60, 116. 1 



4 



Labadorf, Robert 90: 56, 116, 120, 180 
Lacamera, Johanna 91: 125, 187 
LaDue, Troy 89: II, 95, 167 
Lafcrriere, Michelle 91: 125, 174, 176, 

180, 181 
LaFlammc, Gloria : 138 
Lagunowich, Alex : 138 
Lambert, Carol : 138, 143 
l.andberg, Jennifer 89: 95, 176 
Landry, Michael 91: 125, 174, 185 
Langdon, Robert 92: 132 
Lapierre, Andrew 89: 95, 155, 180 
LaPierre, Mary 90: 12, 47, 116, 179 
Larro, Jeanetle 91: 125, 187 



Lashway, Kevin 89: 60, 95 

Latino. Raffelena : 138 

Lavoie, Jeffrey 92: 132 

Lavoie, Jennifer 90: 53, 66, 67, 115, 116, 

119 
Lavoie, Tim : 109 
Leccese, Lisa 91: 125 
Lech, Jennifer 90: 39, 170. 116, 173 
Lefeb»re, Gregory 89: 6, 55, 78, 79. 90, 

96, 101, 148, 149, 173 
Lefebvre, Kathleen 89: 96 
Lefort, Christina 91: 52, 53, 125 
Leger, Allan : 132 
Leone, Kelli : 109 
Leone, Mynde 91: 125 
Leritz. Elizabeth : 50, 78, 79, 132, 134, 

185 
Lesniak, Denise 90: 20, 39, 116 
Leung, Michelle : 163, 170, 179 
Leung, Sharon 89: 96, 105, 146, 163, 175, 

179 
Leung, Wai-Min 90: 118 
Lewenczuk, Anna 90: 118 
Lewenczuk, Jason : 132 
Lewis, Kalherine 91: 125, 170, 174, 186, 
187 

Lewis, Lisa 91: 2, 4, 125, 170, 174, 180, 
186, 187 

Liberty, Maribcth 91: 15, 126, 161 

Liese, Amy : 53, 75, 132 

Ligarski, Carol : 138, 167 

Ligarski, Michael 90: 34, 118, 166 

Little, Jennifer : 132 

Little, MaryAnne : 138 

Logan, John : 138 

Loper, Alexis 92: 53, 132, 135 

Lopez, Keith 92: 12, 132, 185 

Lucarelle, Christopher 92: 12, 63, 132 

Lucarelle, Jennifer 91: 123, 126, 170, 174, 
180, 182 

Lussier, Judith 90: 38, 118, 167 

Lussier, Paul 91: 41, 126 

Luttrell, Jeffrey 89: 34, 35, 60, 96 

Luttrell, Melissa 91: 39, 48, 49, 126, 178, 



Luvera, Gina 89: 96, 163 

Lynch. Christopher 92 56, 132 

Lynch, Jennifer 91: 39, 50, 75, 126, 129, 

170, 174, 180 
Lynch, Kathleen 91: 126 
Lynch, Michael 90: 118, 160, 179 
Lyons, Diane : 65 
Lyons, Tiffany : 39, 148, 149 




Posing for the camera at Model 
Congress before the debating 
starts are Jen Doyle, Doug Went- 
worth, Kirsten Root, Bill Jackson, 



M 



Ma 



Mapalhacs, Joao 91: 126 

Magalhaes, Natercia 90: 118 

Maharne, Krina 91: 126 

Mahoney, Christine 92: 132 

Makuch, Craig 89: 44, 76. 96, 144, 145 

Makuch, Treena 91: 126, 161, 174 

Maleckas, Catherine : 139 

Maloney, Lynn 89 45, 96, 140, 170, 171, 

174, 180, 187 
Maltby, Monica 91: 9, 21, 74, 75, 126, 

127, 129, 174, 176, 180, 182. 183, 187 
Mandolini, Jim : 41 
Mandrala, Jeff : 76, 146 
Mandrala, Jennifer 90: 118 
Manegre, Charity 92: 53, 66, 67, 132 
Manegre, Henry : 139, 139 
Mango, Thomas 89: 22, 24, 34, 35, 60, 

61, 71, 83,96, III, 170. 171, 172, 173, 

206 
Manning, Dave : 28, 42, 43, 144. 145 
Manning, Kerry 91: 9, 53, 126, 174, 176, 

180, 182, 185 
Manning, Lisa 90: 39, 48, 49, 115, 118, 

170, 180 
Manseau, Dan : 206 
Manseau, Marianne 90: 39, 52, 53, 74, 

118 
Marchesseault, Marianne 89: 11, 15, 47, 

51, 96, 111, 173, 180 
Mariani, Marcelo 89: 96, 186 
Mariani, Mary : 139 
Markham, Jennifer 91: 75, 126 
Marrero, Martin 91: 126 
Martell, Charles : 46 
Martial, Dennis 90: 118 
Martin, Christine 89: 20, 21, 96 
Martin. Clarence 92: 132 
Martin, Elizabeth : 139 
Martin, Gerald : 60 
Martin, Shannon 89: 15, 45, 96, 182, 186, 



Martineau, Torrie 90: 
Marveso, Sara 92: 132 
Mascaro, Anthony 90: 



179. 1X(] 




Jerry McMahon, Bill Scarlett, Anju 
Reejhsinghani, Kerry McAleer, 
Erika Kostka, and Jack Welch. 



Mascaro, Dina 90: 118, 180 

Mascaro, Gregory 92: 132 

Mascaro. Michael 92: 56, 132 

Mastrioanni, Dan : 144, 145 

Mastroianni, Krislen 89: 20, 36, 97 

Mather, Dawn 90: 118 

Matthews, Todd 89: 44, 60, 68, 69, 97 

McAleer, Kerry 89: 97, 173, 174 

McCarthy, Jennifer 91: 38, 126, 174 

McCarthy, Robert : 11, 139, 139 

McCray, Louis 92: 63, 132 

McCray, Serge 90: 118 

McCullough, Kevin : 42, 43 

McCurry, Michael 92: 56, 132 

McDonald, Erin 92: 132 

McDonald, George 92: 132 

McDonald, Keitha 89: 97, 152, 160, 162, 

174 
McDonald, Kelly 89: 21, 97, 164 
Mcelroy, Bonnie 90: 118 
McFarland, Keith 90: 68, 69, 118 
McFarland, Scott 91: 126 
McFeeters, Rebecca 89: 46, 47, 51, 97, 

176, 179, 182 
McGahan, Sarah 91: 2, 126, 148, 170, 

174, 187 
McGahan, Tara 89: 98 
McGranahan, Eric 89: 44, 98. 166, 176, 

180 
McGranahan, Lynn : 164 
McGrath, Donna : 39, 50 
McGrath, Shelly :90 118 
Mclssac, Rebecca 89: 52, 53. 98 
McKenna, Tim : 175 
McKeon, Brian 89: 87, 98, 165 
McKinnon, Brent 90: 60, 118 
McMahon, Gerald 91: 126 

McMinn, Nanhee 91: 39, 126, 153, 170. 

174, 176, 180 
McMinn, Roger 89: 34, 98 

Meisner, Chad 90: 42, 60, 72, 73, 118 

Meisner, Christopher 89: 7, 60, 98 

Meisner, Steven 91: 34, 60, 126 

Melcher, Darren 91: 34. 126 

Melcher, Robert 90: 118 

Mellen, Casey 92: 132 

Mellon, Robert 90: 118, 173 

Mellon, Scott : 41, 60, 61 

Menard, Jason 92: 63, 132 

Mendrala, Jeffrey 90: 118, 146 

Mercier, Corrinne : 139 

Merigian, Lisa 92: 132 

Messier, Suzanne 90: 6, 27, 65. 118, 120 

Methe, Cheri 89: 58, 59, 95, 161 

Methe. Eric 90: 118, 143 

Metzger, Kara 89: 99 

Michalski, Jody 92: 132, 187 

Mikaelian, Pamela 89: 99 

Mikuszewski, Paul 91 68, 69, 126 

Miller, Corinn 89: 99, 174, 187 

Miller, Harold : 39,49, 136, 139. 139 

Miller, Kevin 90: 70, 71, 118 

Minnon. Dawn 89: 99 

Minnon, Deanna 91: 126 

Miodowski, Frank : 109 

Miodowski, Robin :91 126 

Mitchell, Lois : 65 

Mooney, Russell : 42, 43, 63, 139 

Moore, Jeffrey 92: 132. 167 

Moore, Thomas 90: 54, 118 

Mora, Mark : 63 

Morace, Tony : 40, 41 

Moran, Derek : 60. 109, 146 

Moran, Laura 91: 126, 178 

Moreno, Melissa 89: 16, 99 

Morgan. Carla 90: 118, 170. 174. 184, 



IS5 



Mori 



Car 



126 



Moriarty, Kevin 91: 126, 160, 185 
Moriarty, Richard 92: 132, 174 
Moriarty, Scan : 41 
Moriarty, Sheila 90: 51. 118, 140, 156, 

170, 178. 182 
Morissette, Christopher 89: 3, 17. 34, 5< 

55, 71, 93, 99, 102, 176. 180 
Morris, Christopher 90: 118 
Morrissey, John : 139 
Morton, Rachel 91: 38, 50, 126, 174 
Morton, Rebecca 89 93, 99, 163, 173 
Mosier, Marq 89: 39, 52, 53, 99, 168, 

170, 173, 174 
Mosier, Vail 91: 38, 126, 166, 167. 174 
Motyl. Julie 90: 6, 118. 166 



Molyl, Kenneth 89: 99 

Muir, Sarah 90: 118 

Muir, Timothy 89: 99 

Mullett, Allison 89: 6, 36, 65, 99, 170, 

171 
Mumper. John 92: 63. 134 
Munroe, C hristina 89: 99 
Murphy, Karrie 91: 15, 126, 187 
Murray, Jcssamy 92: 134 
Mussclman. Byron : 139, 160, 178 
Myers, Randall 90: 41,60, 118 
Myctle, Theresa 92: 134 



'H 



Nadolski, Michael 90: 118 

Nakashian. Lauren 92: 134 

Neff, Mark : 42, 43 

Nelson, John : 46, 160 

Nelson, Matthew 91: 46, 126, 185 

Ng, Gina 90: 118. 187 

Nicoli, Megan 92: 134, 185 

Niederfringer, Julie 90: 47, 117, 118, 120 

Niziolek, Martha : 139 

Noble, John 92: 12,48, 134, 185 

Noonan, Paula : 139 

Nooney, Renee 92: 134 

NorCross, Nancy : 139 

Notarangelo, Rosemary : 139 

Nowak, Thaddeus 92: 134 

Nowakowski. Gregory 91: 126 



O'Brien. Kealy 92: 53, 75, 134 
O'Connell, William 91: 126 
O'Connor, Gregory 90: 9. 42. 43, 56. 

148 
O'Connor, Shawn : 144, 145 
O'Donnell, Sarah : 185 
O'Donnell, Sheila : 66, 67. 134 
O'Neil, Pat : 39 
O'Neil, Robert : 56, 134 
O'Shaughnessv, Jeffrey 89: 3. 6, 20, 

54. 100, 101, 111, 153. 170. 173, 1 



185 



Ober. Chandra : 134 

Ober, Jeremy : 154 

Oglesby, Bryan 91: 72, 126 

Orquiola. Nancy 90: 47. 65, 118. 120. 170 

Orr. Rebecca 50. 134 

Orszulak, Thomas : 139 



Osman. Wendy : 134 
Osmond. Patricia : 139 
Ouimette, Christopher • 
Oylcr. Kimbcrlv 90: 118 



Pabich. Diana 90: 47. 51. 118. 173. 185 

Pafumi. Robert 91: 126 

Pafumi. Tracy :S 134 

Palmer. Phil : 63 

Paluck. Kcllic : 36 

Pappas, Pamela : 206 

Parker. A. Luke 91: 126 

Parker. Dinecn : 134 

Parker. Scott : 41 

Patel. Rinku 91: 126 

Patel. Shital 89: 100. 180 

Palernosto. Rachelle 90: 118 

Patterson. Jennifer 89: 13. 100. 158. 159. 

180. 185 
Pedace. Cianna 89: 52. 53. 100 
Pedace. Todd : 42. 43 
Pederzani. Jcnnell 91: 126 
Pclouze. Brigitte 91: 6, 38. 51. 123. 126. 

128. 170. 174. 187 
Penso, Marc 91: 126 
Pcnso. Matthew : 134 
Pepin, Nicole 91: 126, 187 
Perkins. Kara : 66. 67. 134 
Perman, Jill 92: 134 
Perotti. Lori Ann 91: 126 
Perri. Bryson 92: 134 
Perry, Tajzha 89: 100, 113 
Perusse, Cynthia 89: 109 
Petruzelli. Jennifer 90: 74. 75. 118 
Petzold, Gary : 139. 139 
Petzold. Sue : 39. 50 
Phaneuf. Julie : 160 
Phillips. Kristen 89: 14. 36. 37. 100 
Picknev, Stacey 89: 100 
Pierce, Susan 91: 50. 79. 123. 126. 148. 

170. 174. 180 
Pietryka, Andrea : 13. 28. 39 
Pietrvka, Michael 89: 17. 41. 70. 71. 93. 

100. 102, 111. 180 
Pietryka. Stephanie 92: 13. 50. 75. 131. 

134. 153 
Pilarcik, Aaron 92: 79. 134. 185 
Pincince. Kelly 91:67, 126. 180. 185 
Piscioneri, Kristen 89: 20. 100 
Piwonski. Cindy : 160 
Podosek, Kathleen 89: 100 
Polarcik. Aaron : 48 
Polchlopek. Patricia : 139 
Polga. Kit : 139 



" 







Taking a breather from shopping, 
Tania remandez. Brandy Renn, 
Teri Tousignant, Jen Jose, Beth 
Gillen, Mary LaPierre, Jennifer 
Riek, Rylan Grant, Caetano Roda- 
milans, Christine Martin, and Sue 
Hanrahan pose for the camera in 
front of a small souvenir shop in 



Sevilla, Spain. These students 
spent two weeks touring Spain 
during the 1989 February vaca- 
tion. 



$ 



Poole, Wendy 92: 134 




173, 174, 175, 180 




Santos, Dennis 89: 103 


Solaroli, Heidi 91: 128 


Popsun, Carol 89: 100 




Rpbles, Ramon : 109 




Sares, Jason 89: 18, 60, 61, 103 


Soltoski, Kari 90: 121 


Poremba. Alan 92: 62, 63, 134 




Rocheford, Christopher 90: 76, 


118, 146 


Sargent, Michael 90: 13, 25, 1 17. 121, 


Solzack, Pamela : 162 


Porter, Kelli : 28 




Rodamilans, Caetano 92: 134 




173, 174, 175, 180, 186, 187, 223 


Solzak, Susan 91: 39, 128, 179 


Porter, Nancy : 139 




Rodamilans, Luciana 89: 84, 102, 109, 


Sauve, Jeanne : 140 


Sommerville, Ronda 90: 121 


Post, Kathryn 90: 118 




173 




Savoie, Charles 92: 134 


Soukup, Craig 92: 56, 134 


Poulopoulos, George 89: 101, 174 




Rodgers, Peter 92: 63, 72, 134 




Sazfarowicz, Bill : 72 


Soule, Leah 91: 128, 187 


Pourier, Nicole : 187 




Rodriguez. Mario 89: 68. 69, 1 


02, 111, 


Scagliarini, Christina 92: 134 


Southworth, Rita : 141 


Prackneck. Barbara : 139, 140 




176, 180 




Scannapieco, Stephen 90: 121 


Sowa, Jody : 109 


Presz, Tom : 28, 34, 35 




Rohan, Brendan 91: 123, 126 




Scarlett, Matthew 92: 12, 63, 134, 185 


Spellios, Peter 89 6, 9, 14, 46, 47, 98, 


Pridemore, Robert 92: 48, 49, 72. 


134 


Roj, Cindy : 36 




Scarlett, William 89: 6, 8, 46, 48, 49, 


104, 110, 111, 180, 182, 183, 185 


Przybylowicz, John : 140 




Roj, Stephanie 92: 50, 66, 67, 


34 


103, 173, 180, 185 


Spencer, Richard : 139, 141, 174 


Putnam, Daniel : 109 




Romeo, Carlo 92: 134 




Schaefer, John 89: 54, 103 


Spillane, Mark 90: 121 






Romeo, Enrique 89: 54, 102 




Scharl, Stephen : 140 


Squeglia, William 90: 41, 60, 118, 121 


2 




Root, Kirsten 89: 6, 18, 22, 25 


48, 49, 


Schmidt, Michael 89: 18. 76, 103, 144, 


St. Pierre, Russell 91: 128, 143 




102, 110, 170, 172, 173, 180 


186, 187 


145, 176, 185 


Stachalek, Matthew 89: 42, 104 




Root, Nathaniel 91 126 




Schmitt, Eric 91: 9, 128 


Stachelek, Jon : 76 






Rosati, Brian : 109 




Schmuck, Stephen 91: 60, 128 


Stahlek, Matt : 9 






Rosati, Martha 89: 103 




Schneider, Todd 90: 121 


Steng, Richard 89: 104 






Rose, Douglas 91: 6, 56. 128 




Schofield, Earl 90: 121, 162, 174, 175 


Sternberg, Karl : 136, 139, 141 


Quinn, Patrick 90: 9. 118 




Rose, Karen : 45, 158, 159 




Schwendenmann, Heidi : 140 


Stevenson, Susan 89: 14, 36, 104 


1 Quisl, Amber 91: 13, 27, 45, 65, 1 


26, 128 


Rosenthal, Dean 92: 56, 72, 134 


Scott, Nathan 89: 7, 60, 71, 103, 113 


Stitsinger, Craig 92: 56, 134 


170, 174, 179, 180 




Ross, Amy 92: 48, 134 




Scott, Ryan 91: 128, 151, 187 


Stolauski, Kari : 162, 174 






Ross, Annette 91: 128, 187 




Searles, Luella : 140 


Stone, Amy 89: 11, 18, 105 






Ross, Elizabeth 91: 128 




Sersanti, Francis : 140 


Stone, Ben 91: 128 


1R 




Ross, Jennifer 91: 128 




Shanahan, Joseph 92: 134 


Stone, Martin 91: 128 




Ross, Rebecca 89: 74, 75, 103, 


150 


Shaw, Jennifer 91: 128, 174, 176, 185 


Stratton, Melissa : 161 






Ross, Richard 90: 118 




Shay, Lawrence 90: 42, 43, 56, 121 


Stratton, Scott 89: 105 






Rothschild, Heather 91: 128, 174, 176. 


Shea, Constance : 140 


Streeter, Carl 91: 128 






185 




Shea. Dave : 34, 35 


Streeter, Mark 89: 34, 105, 173, 179, 180 


Raczka, Kathleen 90: 1 3, 45, 64, 65, 1 1 - 


Rovithis, Tia 90: 20, 22, 121 




Sheehan, Florence : 140 


Streeter, Thomas 90: 121 


173, 180 




Roy, Kevin : 144, 145 




Sheehan, Mark 89: 41, 48, 49, 104, 10S 


Stuart, Amy 91: 128 


Raczka, Kellie 92: 25, 50, 66, 67, 


34 


Roy, Robert 90: 121 




1 12, 176, 180 


Sullivan, Amy 90: 38, 66, 67, 121, 170, 


Radwilowicz, Elizabeth : 140 




Royer, Richard 90: 121 




Shepard, Jodi 92: 134, 184, 185 


173, 180 


Raffaele, Susan 89: 21, 101 




Rover, Robert 91: 128 




Sherman, Gregory 89: 104, 112, 152 


Sullivan, Ellen 91: 39, 50, 128, 174, 180, 


Raschi, John 89: 101 




Rubner, Tina : 109 




Shimizy, Ko : 109 


187 


Raschilla, Lisa 92: 134 




Ruscio, Kara 92: 22, 64, 134 




Shults, Dana 92: 134 


Sullivan, James 91: 60, 76, 128, 145 


Reavey, Tara 91: 19, 45, 79, 126, 


48, 


Ruscio, Thomas 90: 121 




Shumate, Todd 92: 63, 134 


Sullivan, Kathy : 41 


174, 176, 179. 180 




Rutstein, Lynn 89: 103 




Sibilia, Carol : 140 


Sullivan, Shawn 89: 101, 105 


Reejhsinghani, Anju 89: 39, 49, 10 


1, 166, 


Ryan, Carrie 89: 103, 163 




Siddell, Brian : 34, 35 


Sullivan, Tim 76, 154, 166 


173, 174, 178, 179, 180 




Rys, Antony 90: 76, 117, 121, 


44, 145 


Silva, Robert : 141 


Sullivan, Timothy 90: 76, 121, 154, 166 


Reejhsinghani, Sanjiv 92: 68, 69, 1 


34. 167 


Rys, Kristen 89: 103, 163 




Simonoff, Edward 89: 104 


Summerville, Rhonda : 150 


185 








Simpson, Lore : 75 


Sutcliff, Amy 89: 105 


Reel, Joan : 140 




S 




Singiser, Suzanne : 45, 158, 159 


Sutter, David : 160, 167 


Renn, Brandy 90: 39, 52, 53, 118, 


163, 




Sirois, Barbara : 141 


Sutton, Kay-Kay 91: 128 


170, 173, 176, 179, 180 






Sirois, Ken : 41 


Sutton, Shauna 92: 134 


Rhie, Sonya 89: 31, 101, 173, 176 


178 






Sitnik, Marylou : 141, 172 


Swartz. Kelly 90: 121 


Rice, Amy 90: 115, 118, 146, 147, 


162, 






Skala, Daniel 91: 128 


Symanski, Anne : 39 


174 








Smith, Amy 89: 58, 59, 104 


Syzmanski, Mark 54, 69, 176, 180 


Richmond, Stacey 89: 101 




Sager, Bethany 92: 9, 22, 133, 


34, 174, 


Smith, Brian 91: 128 


Szafarowicz, William 92: 12, 56, 134 


Richter, Lori 91: 58, 59', 126 




187 




Smith, Chris : 41 


Szczebak, Lynn 91: 128 


Riek, Jennifer 89: 24, 47, 102, 109, 180 


Sager, Joyce : 140, 183 




Smith, Kimberly 89: 39, 104, 163 


Szymanski, Mark 89: 68, 105 


Rihm, Molly 90: 6, 65, 118, 120, 


70 


Sala, Christopher 90: 121, 185 




Smith, MacGregor 89: 15, 104, 161 




Roberts, Kimberly 90: 47, 52, 53, 


118, 


Salerno, Carolee 90: 12, 39, 64 


65, 115, 


Smith, Matthew 89: 42, 104 




121, 170 




121, 170, 173, 186, 187 




Smith, Michael 90:68, 69, 121 


7 


Robinson, Cynthia 90: 118 




Salomone, Anita 92 66, 67. 134 




Smith, Noel 90: 41, 56, 76, 121, 144, 1 


Robinson, James 90: 118, 185 




Samble. Jennifer 90: 53, 74, 12 


, 178, 180 


158, 170, 173 




Robinson, Jason 91: 42, 126, 148 




Sanders, Jennifer 90 47, 66, 67 


121, 174, 


Smith, Richard 89: 44, 60, 76. 104, 144 




Robinson, Jeff : 42, 43 




176, 180, 185 




145, 180 




Robinson, Luke : 160 




Sanders, Sandra : 140 




Smith, Tara 91: 128 


Takorian, Amy 89: 106, 161, 163 


Robinson, Margaret : 140, 174 




Sanders, Taese 91: 128 




Snook, Laurie 92: 134 


Takorian, Becky : 187 


Robinson, Mia 89: 10, II, 39, 102 


.111. 


Sanderson, Wendy 89: 103 




Soja, Cynthia 90: 121 


Talbot, Carrie 91: 125, 128, 180 














Talbot, Christy 89: 20, 74, 106, 180, 182, 












185 
Tarantino, Michael 89: 9, 15, 41, 54, 84, 






98, 106, 166, 180, 187 














Taylor, Rachel : 109 










T 


\ J 


Taylor, Sara 91: 9, 36, 75, 123, 128, 183 


^Mf^^^^^Bk 








> 


At* 


Tcece, Tammy 92: 134 


^Hp ^^B 






i 


1 TV 


Tencza, Elizabeth 92: 134, 174 


n-*- -1 






+Vi 


* _^ 1 


Tenerowicz, Philip : 109 








111 


ItiK 


Theocles, Charles 91: 128 


Mr\ _ . m 












Thiffault, Diana 89: 36, 106 


Jp . * M 


9B 






\/r\n 


r r^Qct 


Thiffault, Stephanie 92: 134 








yUU 


L Uddl 


Thomas, Jason : 56, 57 










•/» 


AjI 


Thomas, Kelli 89: 2, 3, 13, 19, 20, 45, 52, 










1SV 


JCsYTn 


53, 66, 67, 106, 162, 174, 180 










v\Jx Lll 


Thomas, Mia 90: 121 


8hyS*sR5PTOHI 








1 


king 


Thompson, James 89: 34, 35, 60, 61, 106 










100 


Thompson, William 89: 41, 54, 55, 78, 79, 












106, 107, 148, 185 


Good Luck, 








into... 


Thorpe, John 90: 121 
Thorpe, Robert 92: 134 
Tienken, Lisa 91: 128 


Class Of '89 








Don Lendry 

JOSTENS 


Tierney, John : 42 

Tiffault, Di : 36 

Tipaldi, Arthur : 13, 36, 54, 55, 141 

Toman, Lori 91: 128, 176, 180 


Wilbraham Motel 






the yearbook company 


Topor, Scott 92: 68, 69, 134 














Totten, Sarah : 162 














Tousignant, Terence 91: 24, 56, 128 














Tranghese, Anthony 92: 134 














Tranghese, Calli 91: 128 

















Trebbe, Michael : 141 

Triggs, Rebecca 90: 53, 121, 187 

Trimmer, Gregory : 34, 141 

Trivedi, Hilesh : 167, 207 

Trolio, Rita 92: 134 

Tromblay, Jana 92: 50, 134, 176 

Trombly, Kevin 89: 24, 41, 54, 55, 107, 

113, 173. 176, 179, 180, 206 
Trombly, Ryan 92: 56, 57, 72, 132, 134 
Troy, James 91: 34, 56, 79, 148, 128 
Trucsdale, Brian : 158, 159 
Truesdale, Daniel 91: 128 
Truitl, Frances 91: 11, 39, 48, 49, 128 
Tucker, John 89: 107 
Tupek, Deborah 89: 12, 52, 53, 107 
Turcotte, Jill 91: 9, 39, 48, 49, 128 
Turcotte, Paula 89: 107, 185, 187 
Turgeon, Jennifer 92: 134 
Turnberg, Patricia 89: 107 
Tyler, Jennifer 92: 134 



STAFF 



11 



1/ 



Valentini, Douglas 89: 107 
Valiquette, Chris : 109 
Van Horn, Gregory 89: 107, 143 
Vecchio, Barbara 89: 27, 107, 176, 

185 
Vedovelli, Kenneth 90: 121 
Veideman, Mary 91: 58, 128, 174, 1 
Veideman, William 92: 56, 134 
Venne, Kimberly 91: 15, 128 
Verani, Louis : 139, 141 
Vermette, Denise 89: 39, 107, 180, 
Verville, Stacey 92: 134 
Vickers, Sonya : 141 
Vinaixa, Inaki 89: 107, 108, 174, 1 
Vincent, Melissa 89: 108 
Vinson, Kirsten 89: 10, 11, 23, 39, 

108, 167, 173, 180, 182, 183 



70 



Wages, Heather 91: 13, 20, 53, 123, 128, 

129, 174, 179, 180, 185 
Waite, Michael : 109 
Walbridge, Jason 90: 34, 56, 57, 121 
Walinski, Helen : 139, 141 
Wallace, Mary 91: 10, II, 128, 129. 178, 

179, 185, 187 
Wallace, Matthew 91: 128 
Walling, Thomas 91: 128, 160, 174, 176, 

179, 182 
Ward, David : 76, 146 
Ward, Robert 90: 121 
Ware, Courtney 91: 20, 39, 58, 59, 122, 

128, 148, 174, 187 
Ware, David 91: 128 
Warga, Mark 89: 108, 165 
Warner, Jeffrey : 109 
Waterhouse. Shelly 90: 121 
Watson, Bonnie 90: 117, 121, 163 
Watts, Michelle 91: 128 
Wawrzonek, Henry 92: 63, 72, 134 
Wegiel, Kenneth 92: 134 
Welch, Dawn 89: 108 
Welch, John 90: 34, 56, 121, 144. 145, 

146, 159, 170, 173, 180 
Welch, Kara 91: 58, 59, 128, 170, 180 
Welker, Brendon : 34, 144, 145 
Wentworth, Douglas 89: 46, 108, 167 
Whalen, Andrew : 34, 35, 141 
White, Constance : 141 
While, Darrin 90: 68, 69, 121 
While, Eric : 63, 72 
White, Laura 90: 39, 66, 67, 119, 121, 



Co-Editors: 

Student Life Editors: 

Sports Editor: 
Sports Staff: 
Senior Class Editor: 
Junior Class Staff: 
Sophomore Class Staff: 

freshman Class Staff: 
Faculty Staff: 
LPVEC Representative: 
Organizations Editor: 
Organizations Staff: 
Academics Editors: 

Photo Editor: 
Ads Editor: 
Managing Editor: 
Business Manager: 
Publicity: 
Contributing Staff: 



Karianne Kraus 
Monica Maltby 
Linda Herbert 
Peter Spellios 
Jeffrey Demavich 
Sara Taylor 
Penny Qriswold 
Anne Courtney 
Kerry Manning 
Keely Fitzgerald 
Bethany Sager 
Kristi Albano 
Jill Hanson 
Shannon Martin 
Becky McFeeters 
Sheila Moriarty 
Lori Oil 

Chrissy Froehlich 
Kerry Cesan 
Christine Agnew 
Kirsten Vinson 
Christy Talbot 
Jennifer Dearden 
Melissa Desjardins 
Jennifer Lech 
Jeffrey O'Shaughnessy 
Molly Rihm 
Lori Toman 
Debbie Tupek 
Sarah McQahan 
Kelli Raczka 
Kara Perkins 
Bree Forcier 
Jen Lucarelle 
Betsy Leritz 
Tom Walling 
Joyce Sager 



THANKS TO ... 

Mrs. Maltby for designing the cover and allowing us to 
work in her basement. 

Amy Kraus, Becky Emerle. Bill Jackson, Tina Fiore, Jen 
Doyle, Mike Pietrvka for writing articles. 

The Qreniers for taking pictures of underclassmen, 
groups and organizations, and the sports teams. 

All of the Falcon Patrons and business advertisers. With- 
out your help, we would not have been able to afford 
this publication. 

Mrs. Mango, Mrs. Lefebvre, Mrs. Herbert for contributing 
pictures. 

Mr. Mike McCartney who got us started during the week we 
spent at Amherst College at the new England Yearbook 
Workshop sponsored by Ohio University. 

Col. Charles E. Savedge, author of Yearbook Fundamen- 
tals, who so inspired us at the Mew England Yearbook 
Workshop. 

Don Lendry, our local Jostens representative, who put up 

with us when we missed deadlines and who helped us 

maintain excellence in our layout. 

Amy Fitzgerald for helping out during the E-Block year- 
book class. 

Kim Eaton for helping with the typing of the book. 

Jostens Publishing Company for their patience during the 
long illness of our adviser. 

COLOPHON 

Production of the 700 copies of the 228 page 1989 
Falcon involved the work of the staff and adviser and 
Jostens American Yearbook Company of Topeka, Kansas. 
Local representative. Don Lendry, helped with technical 
aspects of cover design and artwork. 

Most body copy and captions are in Benguait Book. One 
hundred pound matte paper was used. Cover is Toreador 
520, with copper foin 383 and rich gold 327 emboss- 
ments. Some Things never Change was processed on 
Apple 1 le computers, using Jostens' Auto Copy 1 Micro- 
Qraphix Series. 

The 1988 Falcon received a First Place Certificate from 
the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. 



173, 174, 185 
Whitfield, Cate : 207 
Whitfield, Neal 91: 68, 69, 128, I 
Whiting, Bryce 90: 42, 43, 60, 61 

170, 173 
Whiting, Jennifer 92: 134, 185 
Whittle, Erica 91: 128, 174, 187 
Wholley, Heather 92: 53. 134 
Wholley, Tara 90: 15, 45. 64. 119 
Wiegel, Kenny : 12 
Wilk, James 89: 46, 68, 69, 88, 1 

158, 159, 166, 167, 176, 180 
Williams, Robert 89: 17, 18, 41, : 

55, 108, 176, 180 
Willoughby, Lauren 92: 134 
Wilson, Colleen 89: 108, 142 
Wilson, Joseph 92: 63, 134 
Wilson, Stacey 90: 65, 115, 121, 
Wing, Curt : 141 

Wing, Mark 89: 108, 160, 179, II 
Winn, Jessica 90: 26, 39, 52, 79, 



^ 



Young, Jeffrey 92: 63, 134 



£ 



149 



Wi: 



I >• .11., Id 



17, 121 
90: 9. 39, 53, 78, 79, 



Withington, Will : 28, 34, 35, 148 
Wolfe, Erica 92: 134 
Wolford, Jeanne : 141 
Woods, Bill : 42, 43 
Worthley, John : 141 
Wright, Scott 90: 121, 185 
Wrona, Christine : 141 
Wuerthele, Mike : 160 
Wyman, Scott 90: 121, 185 
Wyzik, Kimberly 92: I, 134, 180 
Wyzik, Laurie 15, 162, 163 



Zadrozny, Leah 92: 134, 134 

Zahr. Jeffrey 89: 7, 9, 15. 84, 108 

Zahr, Karen : I, 134, 180 

Zahr, Sandra : 141 

Zajac, Mark 89: 109 

Zajac, Pamela 91: 128, 187 

Zanfagna, Ann Marie : 141 

Zeo, Christopher 89: 18, 109, 176 

Zephir, Douglas 90: 117, 121 

Zepke, Amanda : 53, 75, 134 

Zhe, Michael 89: 34, 109, 160, 173, 179. 



Zhe, Michelle : 134, 
Zimmerman, Kristel 
Ziobro, Stephanie : 1 
Zollner, Jessica : 134 
Zollner, Paul 90: 121 



87 



There are many students who are not members of the staff of the Falcon 
yearbook who gave generously and competently of their time by contribut- 
ing articles. Those, whose names accompanied their articles, are listed 
below. To them and to the many others who contributed, we offer our 
gratitude. Anju Reejhsinghani, Kirsten Root, Kevin Trombly, Mia Robinson, 
Kim Eaten, Katie Dennis. Katerie Collins, Cheri Methe. Amy Davidson. Jenni- 
fer Kennedy, Teri Tousignant, Alexis Heede. 



PATRON ADS 

The 1989 Falcon Staff 
would like to thank the 
following patrons for 
their monetary sup- 
port and for their mes- 
sages. 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert 

Holbrook 
"Best Wishes. 
Class of 1989!" 

The Mane Event 

Phyllis Pierce 
"Leave it to Beaver," 
Love Filis and Fran 

Professional Cleaners 

Rice's Fruit Farm 
"Best Wishes for a 
Successful Future" 

Pat and Dave Donovan 
"Best of Luck, 
Class of "89!"" 

Joyce and David Sager 
"Our lives have been 
enriched because of 
our involvement with 
the Class of 1989. 
We wish you 'salud, 
amor y pesetas, y 
tiempo para 
eozarlos."' 



£ 



Every year, Miss Brewer's 

Senior Seminar classes dress 

up for the Roaring Twenties 

Day. These Seniors relive the 

events of the days gone by as 

well as enjoy themselves. 

There are certain traditions 

that exist in every school, 

and this, of course, is a 

Minnechaug tradition. With 

each year that goes by, this 

event shows us that SOME 

THINGS NEVER CHANGE! 



Chrissy Eroehlich, yearbook pho- 
tography editor, focuses to cap- 
ture a memory of her trip to Spain. 
In the background is Mrs. Ann 
Tousignant. 





^ 





Now that you've taken a look around, sit back. Reflect upon 
what you've just seen. Was it everything that you expect- 
ed? We certainly hope so. As you've looked back on some 
of the events of the past year, we hope that you noticed some of 
the changes, as well as some of the similarities to the years 
before. 

We have to take life day by day, and understand that things are 
not going to go as we have planned. Along with life's disappoint- 
ments, there also exist its highlights, such as the win after a 
terrible season which the Boys' Varsity Basketball team exper- 
ienced this season. They struggled through three games with 
triple overtimes to win or lose by a point. After a season of many 
losses they brought delight to the fans as they ran away with 
their last Longmeadow game. 

Minnechaug was faced with many changes this year. We were 
introduced to our new principal, Mr. Robert Johnson. We en- 
joyed many half days as our teachers worked to prepare reports 
for the upcoming school accreditation. We experienced disap- 
pointment with an almost snow-free winter, but we did enjoy our 
lunchtime breaks in the cafeteria with the accompaniment of 
music. Most important, however, are the changes being exper- 
ienced by the seniors who are ready to set free from their Minne- 
chaug experience. Yes, changes will occur in their lives, some 
will go to college, others will enter the work force, but the 
common thread will be that SOME THINGS NEVER CHANGE! 




o 



Mike Sargent volunteers his time 
to help out at the Harvest Days 
held at Laughing Brook last fall. 







# 




omeTfiinas 

Tltver 
Change^ 



Unable to play in the first Varsity 
Boys' Soccer game against North- 
ampton, Eric Keeler watches from 
the sidelines as his team works for 
its first win. Eric pulled a muscle 
in his hip at Rob Williams' house 
before school started this fall, 
which caused him to miss playing 
half of the soccer season. Injury of 
athletes is another example of 
how SOME THINGS NEVER 
CHANGE. 




^ 




JQS7INS 



"V1LBRAHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY